Training for real life upsets

Abid

AR-1 gyro manufacturer
Joined
Oct 31, 2011
Messages
6,472
Location
Tampa, FL
Aircraft
AR-1
Total Flight Time
4000+ 560 gyroplanes. Sport CFI Gyro and Trikes. Pilot Airplane
Saw this safeblog article.
We have seen/heard of a lot of things about uncompensated torque creating torque roll and power creating yawing on changes etc. in gyroplanes because we believe these things create fatal accidents in gyroplanes when accompanied by unloading of rotors.
The reality is the same power inputs or changes etc. also create fatal accidents in airplanes during unexpected stalls because the same forces are there as well. It is training that keeps competent pilots alive.
How many of us gyroplane pilots after getting initial rating or add-ons go back for additional training and advanced training. Getting comfortable doing pedal turns on a dime or takeoff power out refresher training or taking training in a different make and model than we fly or increase our knowledge and skill?

 
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As an Instructor Abid, you will no doubt have found a variation in the innate ability of your students.

As an instructor in the various phases of my career, and a great number of students, I have found individuals who seemed to have possessed an instinctive feel for flight from the onset. The description for such an individual in a variety of skills is called 'a natural'.

Barry would seem to be one such individual. His ability to fly to standards that surpass most other pilots doesn't make him 'thick', rather than one possessing a remarkable ability to master manoeuvres that most others sensibly avoid because they simply could not do them without disaster.

Rather than decrying it, I prefer to marvel at it, and appreciate its elegance beauty and rarity, while appreciating that few others could safely attempt to replicate it.

Bob Hoover was another such individual and few thought of him as thick, stupid or unsafe. Simply acknowledged his mastery of flight.
 
You and I totally agree sir. That man is probably the best stick in a gyro I have ever seen. When Dad and I saw him do the spiraling tail slide we both looked at each other and said damn I didn’t know a Dominator could do that.
 
As an Instructor Abid, you will no doubt have found a variation in the innate ability of your students.

As an instructor in the various phases of my career, and a great number of students, I have found individuals who seemed to have possessed an instinctive feel for flight from the onset. The description for such an individual in a variety of skills is called 'a natural'.

Barry would seem to be one such individual. His ability to fly to standards that surpass most other pilots doesn't make him 'thick', rather than one possessing a remarkable ability to master manoeuvres that most others sensibly avoid because they simply could not do them without disaster.

Rather than decrying it, I prefer to marvel at it, and appreciate its elegance beauty and rarity, while appreciating that few others could safely attempt to replicate it.

Bob Hoover was another such individual and few thought of him as thick, stupid or unsafe. Simply acknowledged his mastery of flight.

You missed the humor by a mile there
 
but then I have met him in person.
As have both Lauren and I...along with meeting you at Bensen Days.:)

I first met Abid over 10 years ago at Zephyrhills.
 
It was indeed.
 
Leigh,

Your Hornet is a neat looking aircraft. What happened to it?
 
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As have both Lauren and I...along with meeting you at Bensen Days.:)

I first met Abid over 10 years ago at Zephyrhills.

That was not me. That was Abid junior at 40 years of age. Nice meeting you at Bensen Days again
 
You might try adding a smiley face or something to indicate the humor. I even reread it and couldn't spot it.

Where is the fun in that. No one scratches their head if I am that obvious.
Yeah probably right though
 
Leigh,

Your Hornet is a neat looking aircraft. What happened to it?
Jim I loved it. It flew beautifully, exceeding expectation, and was a great father and son project. The advice I got from people on the Forum was invaluable, along with great personal observations from various people at two Bensen Days.

When we flew that maiden flight on Labour Day, the airfield was ours, the feeling when it lifted off that first time, amazing, shortly followed by the various circuits and landings we did. Stuart did sounded slightly surprised when it first flew.

Was not happy with the rudder, I felt it was too flimsy. Wasn't that happy with the push pull boat type rudder cables. The pre-rotator was a unfinished prototype, bought with that knowledge...and unfortunately did give us running problems...but overall was great learning experience.

It was a great journey to do with a son, and, started Stuart on a new career which he has been very happy with.

Certainly confirmed my love of gyros.


Sadly, I was running into money problems, getting over to fly her was infrequent, and Stu was going back to A&P school and needed the fees. We parted her out and sold the major bits getting back a fraction of what we had spent. The almost brand new DC DI 503, treated exhaust system, new Dragon wings, Black Max brake system, and a few of the instruments. What we did both get back though was the amazing experience of building our very own gyro and flying her.

(The squeaking noise during the video was the old and rusty swivel chair Stuart was sitting on as he videoed the performance....Not the gyro...and Stu's observation on the 'cloudless sky', was testament to just how quickly Florida pop-ups can form when one isn't paying attention. I was and he wasn't, then again I was heading directly towards it and he was sitting in the hanger. That 'little' feller in the West probably went to 35,000' plus, with a big fan anvil and a little later gave us a real drenching:))
 
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