Tango 2 - N8445P - Dublin Texas - wind

Steve_UK

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I'm not a pilot but have been lucky enough to fly in Mi-24 Hind, Mi-2, Mi-17, Lynx HAS3, Gliders, GA
Latest FAA ASIAS report another - Oct 5th 2019 - Dublin airfield, Texas, USA - Tango 2 - N8445P - FAA ASIAS states "AIRCRAFT KNOCKED ONTO SIDE BY WIND GUST WHILE LANDING, DUBLIN, TX. - injuries listed as none, damage as substantial


FAA register currently shows registration pending, cert terminated
 

WaspAir

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I just hate that description -- "knocked onto side by wind gust" -- as if there was no pilot involved, as a completely passive response of an unmanned machine. That could be a description for an inadequately tied down parked aircraft, but it should not be appropriate for one that was in the process of landing and under the control of an aviator.
 
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Wow. Haven’t read this section of the forum for awhile, but it is very disturbing to have accidents by new pilots flying solo. I have flown many different types of fixed wing aircraft over the years- Cessnas, Pipers, my beloved Luscombe, my also beloved Mitchell Wing, not so beloved Tierra ll. N3 Pup, Quicksilvers, etc. As far as gyros, I got my Sport Pilot Gyro endorsement in Magnis, have flown other Magnis, MTO Sport, Calidus, Sparrowhawk and AR-1. So I have experience with instructors saving me and with having to teach myself how to fly new-to-me aircraft. I felt confident in flying those single place, very light, very different fixed wing aircraft partly because in all my training with fixed wing instructors, I was allowed/required to solo the aircraft I had been training in. This provided me with the experience of controlling a machine that was lighter, more responsive, more sensitive, but still one in which I could feel comfortable. In all my training in gyros, I have never flown solo, so have never experienced the lighter, more responsive, more sensitive aspect of these wonderful aircraft. I am very hesitant to buy a light single place machine because of having no experience soloing the somewhat heavier 2 place machines. I understand that gyro training is relatively new and that having a training ship even slightly damaged can be catastrophic to a one person business. I guess my question to all the gyro instructors out there is do they allow students to solo in the instructor’s aircraft? If not, what supervision is required to help the student solo his own, especially a different single place machine? Unfortunately, you can’t fix stubborn, so if a newbie won’t seek help.....but it just seems a lot of new pilots are not prepared for solo flying.
 

AirCommandPilot

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I read a description from a gyro pilot on the ground that witnessed the roll over. He says it was because the front wheel touched the ground before he got stopped and it caused the front to push over making the machine roll. (landing in a crosswind with rudder/wheel turned)
 

Vance

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I had not read anything about this being a new pilot.
The final report will have the pilot's experience and the wind conditions.
When I sign someone off to solo they are typically limited to a five knot wind with a two knot cross wind component at an airport where we have flown.
I feel wind limits should be expanded gradually.
I have not flown a Tango so I don't know anything about their ground handling.
For a certificated pilot no solo time is required for a Sport Pilot, Gyroplane certificate.
A linked nose wheel steering is a popular excuse for a landing mishap.
In my experience with the linked nose gear on Magni, ELA, AutoGyro, American Ranger, Titanium Explorer, SparrowHawk and RAF; the nose wheel can be plopped down misaligned pretty hard at ten knots without mishap as long as I am light on the pedals.
I watched Alex Fling his Tango at El Mirage several times touch the nose wheel down with speed misaligned without any apparent diversion.
I would find it helpful to hear from the accident pilot about his experience, conditions and what he feels happened.
 

GyrOZprey

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Of all the linked nose-gear/rudder new-gen gyros ...the TAG with it's front wheel suspension block and good rear-trail in the fork is probably the most forgiving in the "cocked-nose wheel" touch-down with forwards motion!
The manufacturer claims he built in an extra mechanism for super tight taxi turns by pushing rudder pedal past the normal rudder-range for flight .... also the front wheel trail is very effective in self-straightening on a cocked touchdown and will push-back against the heavy-footed very effectively!
 

ultracruiser41

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I’ve never had an issue with a linked nose wheel. There are a whole bunch of fixed wing aircraft with linked nose gear and most have no issues. If a gyro pilot is having handling issues because of a linked nose wheel.....then I’d say they need more training. It all goes back to proper ground/rotor handling.....and the only way to get better at it...is training...practice....training.....practice....etc....etc.......

As Vance said.......it really doesn’t cause a lot of diversion when a cocked nose wheel touches down if the pilot is aware.
 
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