Take-off procedure to avoid flapping

Mike G

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Is this the current take-off procedure being taught in the US to avoid flapping/blade sailing?
Mike G
 

Vance

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Is this the current take-off procedure being taught in the US to avoid flapping/blade sailing?
Mike G
I have flown with 43 CFIs in 17 different model gyroplanes and it is my observation that each teaches the various takeoffs a little differently.

As a certificated flight instructor in the USA I teach my client to pass their proficiency check ride even for a sport pilot endorsement I need to teach my learner normal takeoff (as in the video), short field takeoff, cross wind takeoff, and soft field takeoff.

The standards are based on the pilots operating handbook for the gyroplane being flown.

I teach from zero wind to seventeen knots with a maximum cross wind component of 10 knots or whatever limitations are in the pilots operating handbook for that aircraft.

In my experience not all takeoffs are the same.

When teaching in an MTO sport in calm conditions my intention would be to teach very similar to what Ron taught and that is what I would expect the applicant to do to pass his proficiency check ride.

If I was giving Ron his proficiency check ride in an MTO Sport in low wind conditions and he performed as in the video on his second takeoff he would pass the normal takeoff portion of the check ride.
 
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Abid

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There is no more stiffness to be had that affects rotor blade sailing/flapping after reaching 60 to 100 rotor RPM. Blade sail or flap is not caused by lack of centrifugal force. It is caused due to aerodynamic reasons as a retreating blade stall due to dissymmetry of lift and that has no bearing cetrifugal/petal force. That part of the ground explanation is not technically correct and too casual. Also, I believe what he is trying to say is that you balance on the mains after starting with stick full aft and takeoff and build speed before allowing it to climb without getting behind the power curve.
 

Philbennett

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. It is caused due to aerodynamic reasons as a retreating blade stall due to dissymmetry of lift
Agree - that part of the pre-flight was just plain wrong. There are situations where the blades are "flapped" because of the air getting under the surface of the individual blades but that is more usually a taxi issue not a ground roll to take off issue. During taxi with stopped or very slow blades where they are already on the teeter stops the prevailing wind can further interfere as Ron described.

But he likely knows that its just how he chose to explain something in his video. Likely just a patter thing.
 
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