Subaru 2.5 powered motorcycle

CLS447

Platinum Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2003
Messages
6,321
Location
Reading, PA
Aircraft
Air Command 503 & Air Command SxS /EJ2.5
Total Flight Time
Aprox 400 gyro
eutrophicated1;n1125934 said:
The poor front-end suspension geometry alone will kill you. Kiwi road regs might be a joke.

I Know , Right ? I was thinking the same thing, You couldn't give me one. I would never ride that thing !

Love that engine !
 

AirCommandPilot

Just a fledgeling
Joined
Feb 24, 2014
Messages
596
Location
Houston
Aircraft
Air Command Elite #003
Total Flight Time
88
CLS447;n1125939 said:
I Know , Right ? I was thinking the same thing, You couldn't give me one. I would never ride that thing !

Love that engine !

Sounds like what I said the first time I saw a gyro.
 

Vance

Gyroplane CFI
Joined
Oct 30, 2003
Messages
16,515
Location
Nipomo,California
Aircraft
Givens Predator
Total Flight Time
2400+ in rotorcraft
No Title

eutrophicated1;n1125934 said:
The poor front-end suspension geometry alone will kill you. Kiwi road regs might be a joke.

If properly executed; that sort of leading link center hub steering works much better than a telescoping front end.

I don't know if this one is properly executed; it looks well thought out.

All motorcycle streamliners at Bonneville use a variation of this sort of suspension.
 

Attachments

  • photo128646.jpg
    photo128646.jpg
    40.1 KB · Views: 0

eutrophicated1

Designated Acronym-Nazi
Joined
Jul 23, 2017
Messages
293
Location
Flint, Michigan
Yes, Vance, this build is executed very well. And I can see where a "Leading Link" type of front suspension would be desirable on a machine that is not intended to change direction or speed rapidly.
 

eutrophicated1

Designated Acronym-Nazi
Joined
Jul 23, 2017
Messages
293
Location
Flint, Michigan
However, all my biking days were spent on-road, in the city, where survival from stupid car drivers meant being able to turn corners in a 10-foot minimum radius, and stopping from 70mph in 94 feet, front tire chirping loudly.
 

eutrophicated1

Designated Acronym-Nazi
Joined
Jul 23, 2017
Messages
293
Location
Flint, Michigan
The only safety was being able to avoid accidents altogether, getting the hell out of the way of 2-3 ton vehicles that couldn't stop, nor turn well at all.
 

eutrophicated1

Designated Acronym-Nazi
Joined
Jul 23, 2017
Messages
293
Location
Flint, Michigan
So, as I'm prone to quote, "Form follows function". So, for motorcycles on the city streets, the lightest, stiffest, most rigid, most powerful, with the best braking and cornering, is the functionality that did it for me.
 

eutrophicated1

Designated Acronym-Nazi
Joined
Jul 23, 2017
Messages
293
Location
Flint, Michigan
"Most rigid" meant having both sides of each wheel supported, and any forces applied to that wheel had to be applied to both sides. Well, in those days, most bikes were chain driven, and none that I recall had chains on both sides of the rear wheel, and that meant: "Expect torsional flexing of the rear wheel to the right." I remember the Honda 1500 with a transverse-mounted 6 cylinder engine that would break loose totally on acceleration, spinning the bike on its own axis, dumping the rider at 60mph. Imagine the surprise of those poor, untrained American kids who had no concept of suspension geometry, when they got on that bike. All they knew was taking off from a red-light at full throttle, in a supposedly straight line, to get to the next red-light. Heh heh.

I also remember the BMW with the double trailing link front suspension. Interesting setup. I like suspended, spring-limited, castoring front wheels on gyros too. I also think I like 4 wheels more than 3, as well.
 

eutrophicated1

Designated Acronym-Nazi
Joined
Jul 23, 2017
Messages
293
Location
Flint, Michigan
If 'tip-overs' is the most common type of gyro accident(it was also the most common of 3-wheeled-auto accident) maybe the 4-wheeled gyro needs to be re-considered.
 

eutrophicated1

Designated Acronym-Nazi
Joined
Jul 23, 2017
Messages
293
Location
Flint, Michigan
Or, maybe a U-2 type of configuration. All you skilled gyro pilots, please don't be offended. I do realize how flexibly effective current gyro configurations are. Its just the engineer in me, trying to imagine outside the box.
 

Vance

Gyroplane CFI
Joined
Oct 30, 2003
Messages
16,515
Location
Nipomo,California
Aircraft
Givens Predator
Total Flight Time
2400+ in rotorcraft
In my opinion Frank; gyroplanes tip over because they have a narrow track and a high center of gravity with a rotor that continues to fly even when a gyroplane is stopped.

I don’t see a lot of tricycle gear airplanes tipping over.

BMW had an Earls Fork that is a leading link fork.

There is a lot more to handling than light and stiff and about ten years ago they started making frames weaker (less stiff) intentionally.

A telescoping fork is not a good design because of static friction and a lack of strength to keep one leg from going up without the other.

In my experience a trailing link or a girder fork is the best for ride quality.

There have been some very advanced road racing motorcycles built with a leading link girder fork.
 
Top