Rotor blade safety, life according to Maxie

madmax

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 2, 2003
Messages
173
Location
Savannah, Ga.
Rotor-blade safety is important for every gyro and every flight. You always want to be sensible and consistent. When you're setting your blades up initially, mark your rotor heads, rotor hubs and rotor blades. Mark one blade A mark the other B. Mark one end of the rotor hub A mark the other B. Mark one side of the rotor head A mark the other side B.

Put the rotor blades together keeping all the A's and B's together. What you have your rotor blade balanced and tracked, if you ever need to take them off the machine to go to another location using this method gives you the best probability of the blades flying same as they were before you took them off.

At Mentone this year I noticed a guy putting his blades together kneeling on the ground with one blade on its leading edge and the other on its trailing edge hammering the bolts into the blades so he could go fly. I cannot express how bad that is. When I questioned him about it he said the blades were made so close tolerance that, that's the only way to put them together. Please please never do that.

I would be more than happy to go in to how to assemble and set up your rotor blades, if anyone would like me to.

Right now I know there's a lot of concern on tip weights possibly sliding out of the tip of the rotor blade.

Here's a picture of a possible solution for those concerned about losing your tip weights. The picture show how you can drill and tap the end of your rotor blade then screw in a threaded rod with J-B weld on it to physically lock everything in place. Then use the J-B weld to close and form the leading edge of your rotor blade. Once this is done you will of course need to rebalance your blades. If you do not know how to balance your blades and you would like a mechanical lock holding everything together, then take it to someone who does knows how.

I will be glad to go into that procedure also if needed.
 

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WaspAir

Supreme Allied Gyro CFI
Joined
Oct 21, 2006
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4,629
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Colorado front range
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Bell 47G-3B-1 / A&S 18A / Phoebus C, etc.
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Rotor-blade safety is important for every gyro and every flight. You always want to be sensible and consistent. When you're setting your blades up initially, mark your rotor heads, rotor hubs and rotor blades. Mark one blade A mark the other B. Mark one end of the rotor hub A mark the other B. Mark one side of the rotor head A mark the other side B.

Put the rotor blades together keeping all the A's and B's together. What you have your rotor blade balanced and tracked, if you ever need to take them off the machine to go to another location using this method gives you the best probability of the blades flying same as they were before you took them off.
One can always follow the helicopter tradition of using colors instead of letters (e.g., on the three blade A&S 18A, one tip was painted yellow, one red, and one green, and the corresponding pitch links at the hub were marked with tape of the same hue).
 

madmax

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 2, 2003
Messages
173
Location
Savannah, Ga.
One can always follow the helicopter tradition of using colors instead of letters (e.g., on the three blade A&S 18A, one tip was painted yellow, one red, and one green, and the corresponding pitch links at the hub were marked with tape of the same hue).
That's correct, you can mark it with anything as long as you mark it with something that helps you be consistent.
 
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