Rotax-582 mounted vertical?

twistair

Living in the Skies
Joined
Nov 24, 2003
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1,161
Location
Kronshtadt, Russia
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none own :( currently flying Calidus mostly
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Don't know exactly, ca. 3000 hours
I was recently asked by local homebuilder who wants to install a R582 in his ultralight helicopter design. The question is if there are any troubles expected/guaranteed if he installs this engine (without gearbox) with crankshaft vertical? Surfing the Net gave nothing to the moment. The only thing I found is a Lonestar helicopter designed by late Ken Rehler many years ago. It has R582 installed that way (crankshaft vertical) though later videos show this helo powered by another engine.

I'll be glad if somebody can add some knowledge about mounting R582 vertically. Local Rotax dealer (they have really excellent engineer) couldn't tell anything besides the suspicion that front (upper for this case) crankshaft bearing can get not enough lubrication in such setup.

Any comments are greatly appreciated.

And well, if we speak R582 - couple more questions about it:

- is there any experience in turbocharging this engine?
- are there any means for altitude compensation for these engines?

Thanks in advance,

Alex
 

C. Beaty

Gold Supporter
Joined
Apr 16, 2004
Messages
9,656
Location
Florida
Rotax 2-stroke engines have troughs under transfer passages that catch oil condensation and have drilled passages that feed it to main bearings. Maybe main bearings get enough lubrication from exposure to the fuel-air mix; maybe not.

Also, 2-stroke engines designed for vertical crankshaft operation such as outboard boat engines have serrations on the connecting rod big ends to wedge an oil film between big ends and crank cheeks. Rotax 2-stroke aircraft engines do not.

Supercharging a port scavenged 2-stroke is iffy, much depends upon the design of the tuned exhaust system; normally forcing more fuel-air mixture into the cylinder simply blows more fuel-air mixture out of the exhaust ports.

Large 2-stroke diesel engines such as those by GM Electromotive that powered many US railway locomotives always had scavenging by forced air and benefited from supercharging because they had separate exhaust valves that closed while transfer ports were still open.
 

bryancobb

Junior Member
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Aug 2, 2010
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Cartersville, GA
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Owned Brantly B-2b/Fly Kitfox III/Mini-500b
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The Rotax 600 E-Tec has direct electronic oil squirt which sprays oil with pinpoint accuracy, directly where its needed.
It uses a tiny amount of oil and don't smoke. I bet it could be used vertically.
 
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