Resuming training

Sv.grainne

Active Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2020
Messages
599
Location
Kerrville, Texas
Have started training again after a 4 month layoff. Two sessions of about 2.5 hrs each over the past two weeks and CFI said he could endorse me to solo. Except I'm going to build and transition to a single place Aviomania.

I was pleasantly surprised but plan to continue flight training with my CFI for now. Transition once I get and build my kit!
 

Eric S

Junior Member
Joined
Dec 22, 2012
Messages
167
Location
Kingsland, TX
Aircraft
Sport Copter Vortex & AAI (Sparrowhawk) RAF
Bobby,

When my CFI said I was ready, he asked if there was anything else I wanted to work on. I asked him to cut the power in various stages of flight. It was super helpful to know if I was operating outside of the height-velocity curve and to see, feel, react to power outages on takeoffs, approaches or anywhere else in or out of the pattern. Try that with your instructor until it's a non-event every time and you'll gain a ton of confidence.

Eric
 

Sv.grainne

Active Member
Joined
Jan 14, 2020
Messages
599
Location
Kerrville, Texas
Thanks Eric, just did some power off landings, wild. Plan to continue training with him for now and will do some of this stuff.

Bobby
 

Resasi

Gold Supporter
Joined
Jul 2, 2007
Messages
8,194
Location
London/ Kilifi Kenya
Aircraft
Gyrs, RAF 2000/Mgni/Bnsn/Hrnet/Mrlin/Crckt/MT-03/Lyzlle AV18-A/Prdtor. Pax ArrowCopter
Total Flight Time
100+ gyro, 16,000+ other
My PPL training was at an isolated airport with very little traffic. My Instructor was a very experienced Ex RAF instructor from the RAF Central Flying School so if you will, an Instructor's Instructor. Lucky me.

From very early on on the downwind coming up to base I was trained, if there was no traffic ahead to proceed abeam the end of the runway and at a time I judged that I could make the runway for landing without power to bring the power to idle and to commence my approach and landing...if possible with having to use any more power.

I was also encouraged, when traffic permitted, to perform my pattern/downwind at a distance and height that would allow me to make the runway if I encountered an engine failure.

Since pattern altitude/position is very often dictated by airport procedures/noise considerations and inhabited areas around an airport this can dictate where this is but in others a degree of judgement can exercised.

In my case a lot of the time 1000’ was pattern alt, the downwind path, if no other traffic was around, was mine to choose, as was the point at which power was reduced to idle after passing abeam the threshold of the active runway and commencing a base turn.

In fact what I subsequently realised was what my Instructor was doing was allowing me to develop a good feel for planning and executing power off landings or what he called ‘fan stops'. This was made possible for most of our training which was done at Sandown Airport on the Isle of Wight, which at the time was not busy at all, and I had chose a concentrated PPL course where we flew two to three times a day.

I was able in that time during my PPL training to get a good handle on judging when to begin an idle power base and final to landing. It helped develop judgement of how the prevailing wind would effect the outcome and to make consistent power off landings. Later jobs would remove these from daily flying but the seed had been set and the foundations of important basic judgement patterns had been laid down.

Ed Sully was an experienced glider pilot. Capt. Robert Pearson, a certified glider pilot was in command of Canada Flight 143 ( The Gimli Glider) when it ran out of fuel 41,000 ft over Ontario with 61 passengers onboard and was able to safely land the Boeing 767 at a small airport in Manitoba. Experience/training can be a vital element in surviving an untoward experience.
 
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