Quick training ending in tragedy

scandtours

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I was reading some news from Namibia this afternoon (from Nov 18) and unfortunately I saw this.

http://www.republikein.com.na/politiek-en-nasionale/algemeen/opleidingsvlug-eindig-in-tragedie.117365.php

Trans.from google:


Mr. Henner Christof Pape
The father of two little girls had tragically in a plane crash died when he was vlieëniersopleiding.

The 39-year-old Mr. Henner Christof Pape, according to the director of investigations vliegtuigongelukke in the Ministry of Works and Transport, Mr. Erickson Nengola, doing solo training flights with the gyrocopter, a microlight plane when the accident occurred.

Mr. Nengola the accident to confirm Republican said Tuesday that around 17:40 on the farm Revelle about 60 miles northwest of Okahandja happen.

The flight instructor, mr. Botha Jansen, is now in hospital in Windhoek where he admitted for severe shock treatment.

According to Mr. Nengola was Mr. Pape working on his own practice to take off and landing to perform.

"He was doing his last solo flight of the day and was constantly by radio with his instructor on the ground connection.

"He came in for a landing and initial investigation has revealed that he too early strength to his stootmotore reduced and convincing enough forward momentum to experience a touchdown to run it."
According to Mr. Nengola the microlight aircraft from an altitude of about 200 feet nose first into the ground vasgevlieg.

Mr. Pape died on impact. The deceased was a German citizen residence in Namibia had.Speaking at the farm Okatora lived and by his wife and two daughters survive.

According to me. Yvonne Coetzee, Mr. Jansen's sister, an autopsy on the deceased has performed and found that an artery in Mr. Pape's head burst when he had his last solo flight was.

The autopsy found that he was dead before the microlight aircraft hit the ground.

"My brother told me that he saw the gyrocopter move to the left.

"He had a radio to the deceased said to his direction to restore and then the plane suddenly started to dive under," Ms. Coetzee said.

She told her brother to the deceased repeatedly said the plane's nose to go, but the man did not respond.

Mr. Jackson sent him to the scene rushed, but could immediately see that mr. Pape was dead. He immediately contacted authorities and reported the accident.
 
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C. Beaty

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Do you speak Afrikaans, Giorgos?

From the little I could get from the newspaper article, this sounded like a PPO/bunt accident. No mention of gyro type but I have my suspicions.
 

Vance

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Not an aircraft challenge.

Not an aircraft challenge.

The way I read it he had a medical challenge and he was dead before he hit the ground.

Thank you, Vance
 

All_In

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So sad, but I thought it said he was dead before he hit the ground.
found that an artery in Mr. Pape's head burst when he had his last solo flight was!

My condolences to the family, at least he died with his boots on!
 

scandtours

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I believe that our gyro pilots friends from S.Africa must know more.
You are right Vance, from what it is written, the autopsy found that he was dead before the microlight aircraft hit the ground.
 

Learjet

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Not sure what where the "quick training" headline comes from as that certainly doesn't appear to be the case.
From the various news / witness reports etc, the pilot had been doing solo circuits whilst maintaining radio contact with his instructor on the ground. As the student pilot made his final approach the instructor noticed that the pilot was no longer responding on the radio or to his instructions to increase power. Shortly thereafter the gyro banked and impacted the ground. The pilot was declared dead at the scene, with subsequent reports indicating that he apparently suffered a brain aneurysm.

 
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Luc De Keyser

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cause and effect

cause and effect

The chances of suffering a brain aneurysm at 39 while training in an autogyro are very very slim. I wonder what the chances are a surgical pathologist mixes cause and effect during the autopsy on a body crushed from a fall of 200 meters showing abnormal arteries from the mere shock and/or from a pre-existing congenital malformation that was asymptomatic?

In investigating such a crash it would seem wise to look into human error (in training) without taking very rare medical events much into account.

Luc
 

EI-GYRO

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Unless you have medical qualifications to back it up, I would suggest this is pointless
and unproductive speculation.
Even if you have, discounting the coroners's verdict with no contrary evidence seems
to be stretching it.
I have no medical qualifications, but it would seem likely that if such a condition existed,
the high pulse rate in early solo flight might well kick it off.

If it walks like a duck, and it quacks like a duck......
 

Luc De Keyser

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EI-Gyro, true enough, but brain aneurysm has a prevalence of 5 to 10%, an incidence of only 10 out of 100.000 per year (more females, more older than 40) and an instant mortality of 10%.

This means that, roughly, a coroner would find an aneurysm in about 1 out of every 10 autopsies but only 1 out of 100.000 per year would die instantly from it. What are the chances this would happen in a newbie at the end of a straining training session just after a power off coming in for a last landing?

So, no speculation, no discounting, just letting the statistics speak for themselves.

Luc
 

EI-GYRO

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Accepted, Luc.

But now that an aneurism has been declared as the cause of death, it is unlikely that
any further investigation will happen, so I dont see any handle to grab hold of
re further comment/speculation about training.

However, if you are looking at gyro training issues, you might like to comment on
my thread ' here's another one to chew on'.
 

PW_Plack

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Even if an aneurysm wasn't instantly fatal, it could be instantly incapacitating which, in flight, might as well be the same thing.
 

Resasi

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Was sitting with someone when they had a brain aneurism.

It was very quick.
 

Luc De Keyser

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EI-Gyro, you are right that legally and morally this case is closed. I am just imagining the right reaction of the safety officer of the airport or the flight school. There is no harm in going through the circumstances and events again as if it were a preventable accident. There aren't that many accidents (I hope) to learn from.

PW_Plack, you are correct but this increases the chances of happening not with an order of magnitude.

Resasi, in your life time you sit much more often with people than you watch a newbie in those circumstances.

Homo sapiens is not equipped with an accurate intuition for probabilities. Casinos thrive on that gap. But that is only one obvious example.
 

Mark E

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I'd like to think that a competant doctor/pathologist would have a pretty good idea whether an aneurism he detected on autopsy was likely to have been fatal, or not.
 

Learjet

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Luc, when I first read the newspaper report (published just 2 days after the accident), and the sister of the deceased pilots' comments about the apparent cause of death having been established, I was rather surprised (and skeptical) that a post-mortem finding would have been concluded quite so quickly. In instances of death through unnatural causes, a police inquest docket is opened, and the post-mortem autopsy will
invariably include toxicology and other lab tests which in this part of the world take weeks, if not months to process before the results are returned and the final autopsy report is released. Although the flight instructors report about the pilot not responding to radio calls and instructions lends credence to the possibility of the pilot's in-flight sudden incapacitation, I too am hesitant to accept the de facto "aneurysm" finding at face value until the official accident report is published.
 
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