Pilot CAN'T FLY IFR because his IPad has died. Martinsburg. REAL ATC

okikuma

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Here's a pilot that is very ill prepared in many ways to attempt an IFR flight.

Does the lack of situational awareness come to one's mind? This Bozo surely lacked any concept of his situation before attempting his flight. Did he ever consider an iPad failure due to overheating. Did he ever think of the legality of trying to use a non-certified electronic equipment for his flight? Did he have a backup plan?

Wayne

Pilot CAN'T FLY IFR because his IPad has died. Martinsburg. REAL ATC

Due to the inability of the NAV approach instrument, the pilot performed an instrument approach to Runway 8 at Martinsburg Regional Airport (KMRB) using only an iPad, but it died. Therefore, the pilot had difficulty following ATC instructions, resulting in a difficult situation for both parties. The pilot encountered difficulties, but the professionalism of ATC was evident as they effectively managed the situation and gave effective instructions.

 
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Did I forget to include the YouTube link? I swear I included it in my original post.

OK, I joined the Bozo crowd. LOL Where's my membership card?

Wayne

Pilot CAN'T FLY IFR because his IPad has died. Martinsburg. REAL ATC
 
Wow.... Just wow.... I wonder how much audio was lost and how much that pilot just ignored ATC -- clearly he ignored a majority of the ATC instructions.
 
Yesterday, I attended a FAAST seminar on IFR Emergencies. There are a growing number of incidents whereas individuals are using Smart Phones and Electronic Tablets (thus non-certified equipment) as the primary navigational equipment for IFR flights. The mental justification from these individuals are as follows:
  • "My iPad is just as good and I save myself thousands of dollars"
  • "I use my smart phone or my iPad for VFR navigation all the time and there is never a problem."
  • "My smart phone tells me everything I need to know. I don't have to think about anything. That's why it is called a smart phone
...And the list goes on.

Wayne
 
The car adapters will vibrate out and not charge your smart devices. Also, if flying in open cockpit the touch screen will not work if there is moisture in the air. Direct sunlight will overheat and shut them off too. Don't drop it out the window when taking photos either if you need it for navigating. Just to help those that rely 100% on smart devices as navigation aids.
 
I was actually on a 600NM IFR flight several years ago, with one VOR, an ADF, and a very strong COMM. I didn't even own a GPS or a cell phone. The ceiling was 2,500 and very dense but it was only 50' thick, maybe 5 seconds is the soup going up and coming down. Very stable air and no wind or precipitation, 4degC. Halfway I neared my fuel stop and Indy Center cleared me down, and under, it was beautiful VFR BUT EVERYTHING, YES EVERYTHING WAS SOLID WHITE!! I canceled IFR but stayed with Indy Center. No way to find the runway. She could still see me on Radar and tried to help. Not a creature was stirring. The airport had an on-field VOR and an NDB was on the approach plate but I wasn't sure it worked. I had no DME. In VFR, I tried tuning the NDB and dang! I could hear the Morse Code. I tracked the final course outbound as the dotdotdash got more faint, so I did a procedure turn, again all in VFR. As I followed the radial, inbound, the NDB signal got stronger & stronger and made a very good alternate DME source. I found the runway and landed on a perfect, undisturbed snow blanket. Fingers-crossed, I hoped the self-serve pump worked. After diddling with the computer on the deserted airport pump, for at least an hour, I just couldn't get it ON. Finally, some owner came to check on his airplane and saw me waving. He rode over on his snowmobile and told me the secret. Letters could be entered by touchscreen but the numbers on the screen didn't work! You had to use the keypad for numbers!

The morals of the story...having and knowing how to use old-timey tools come in handy sometimes! and try the keypad!
 
Wow, Bryan, that is pretty minimal IFR equipment.
I bet partial panel would be interesting with that set-up.

Not arguing, Wayne, but overlaying the approach plate on Foreflight does often help my situational awareness sometimes.
Just can't be the PRIMARY navigational source.
 
I was actually on a 600NM IFR flight several years ago, with one VOR, an ADF, and a very strong COMM. I didn't even own a GPS or a cell phone. The ceiling was 2,500 and very dense but it was only 50' thick, maybe 5 seconds is the soup going up and coming down. Very stable air and no wind or precipitation, 4degC. Halfway I neared my fuel stop and Indy Center cleared me down, and under, it was beautiful VFR BUT EVERYTHING, YES EVERYTHING WAS SOLID WHITE!! I canceled IFR but stayed with Indy Center. No way to find the runway. She could still see me on Radar and tried to help. Not a creature was stirring. The airport had an on-field VOR and an NDB was on the approach plate but I wasn't sure it worked. I had no DME. In VFR, I tried tuning the NDB and dang! I could hear the Morse Code. I tracked the final course outbound as the dotdotdash got more faint, so I did a procedure turn, again all in VFR. As I followed the radial, inbound, the NDB signal got stronger & stronger and made a very good alternate DME source. I found the runway and landed on a perfect, undisturbed snow blanket. Fingers-crossed, I hoped the self-serve pump worked. After diddling with the computer on the deserted airport pump, for at least an hour, I just couldn't get it ON. Finally, some owner came to check on his airplane and saw me waving. He rode over on his snowmobile and told me the secret. Letters could be entered by touchscreen but the numbers on the screen didn't work! You had to use the keypad for numbers!

The morals of the story...having and knowing how to use old-timey tools come in handy sometimes! and try the keypad!
Bryan,

So you were using the null on the loop antenna to judge your distance by audio signal strength.

The reason why IFR Enroute Charts lack any topographical details is when one is in IMC, one cannot view topographial features on the ground.

Brian,

As you mentioned, ForeFlight is a good secondary tool to help navigate. So are VORs, NDBs (what's left of those aids) GPS, INS, etc. The primary "tool" for navigation and decision making is the brain between one's ears.

The one essential method of primary VFR navigation that is lost today among many newer pilots today is good old fashioned "pilotage." The key to effective pilotage is preflight-planning. Sitting down before the flight. Review the route on the sectional, and "situational aware" each geographical feature "waypoint" that one will see and use for navigation in their brain.

Wayne
 
Wow, Bryan, that is pretty minimal IFR equipment.
I bet partial panel would be interesting with that set-up.

Not arguing, Wayne, but overlaying the approach plate on Foreflight does often help my situational awareness sometimes.
Just can't be the PRIMARY navigational source.
I was actually viewing the flight as VFR on-top and I had enough gas to do a 180 and get back home. Sky was scattered there. I just would not have accomplished the mission of delivering a mold tool to Decatur Mold.
 
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