OT: You'll never see the likes of this again

Always thought that was one of the most beautifully formed aircraft ever. Knowing any feature on it was done for practicality just makes its elegant simplicity even more impressive.
 
Hello Juergen,

As a child, I never did get to see the XB-70 fly, but have stood under it on the ramp at Edwards AFB. Massive!

Wayne

OT: You'll never see the likes of this again
 
A tragic end to a magnificent machine.
 
That mus indeed have been impressive, Wayne! Judging from the nice picture you posted the cockpit must have been nearly 20 feet above the ground, what a beast that was: her foldable wing panels cover half a tennis court..., and yes, she really is a magnificent sight. As Brian pointed out this is definitely one of the best examples of "form follows function" in the history of engineering.

A couple of high resolution pictures is available here:
https://archive.org/details/2004-L-00260

Have a nice weekend everyone!

PS: it's great to share pics with other enthusiasts...;-)

PPS: I just couldn't resist..;-( Bonus pic of another of my favourite aircraft:
https://archive.org/download/2004-L-00279/2004-L-00279.jpg
 
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I lived in Barstow, CA when the RB-70 was flying. One day my brother and I skipped school and had a nice day riding in our dune buggy. Then the stuff hit the fan... contractor chase plane hit the tail section, plane crashed, ejection canisters and chutes falling.

The area was cordoned off very quickly and we had some explaining to do!
 
I made a special effort to see the XB-70 at the Air Force Museum a few years ago.
Great to be able to still see it in-person. It was a little bit scuffed-up.
"Compression Lift".... a successful physics experiment.
 
A big challenge would be taxiing it around. You would need to be out over the grass before you make your turn so that you don't cut the inside corner and drag the mains through the weeds. It was something we had to be careful of on the 747 but the XB-70 is even further out.

Rick
 
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