New Guy with Questions

TenSeven

Newbie
Joined
Nov 3, 2016
Messages
13
Location
Carlsbad
I have had some experienced fixed wing pilots work hard at not letting go of bad habits and some complete novices who have trouble with the simple, basic flight maneuvers.

I just signed off a 3,000 hour fixed wing pilot for his sport pilot rotorcraft, gyroplane proficiency ride after a little over 15 hours of dual and he was still unlearning fixed wing habits on the last flight with me. If he ever has an incident I feel it will probably because he forgot he was not flying his RV10.

I had a thirty something student with zero flight experience in anything and English as a second language. I gave him an introductory lesson and in his first .6 hours of dual he flew his ground reference maneuvers to practical test standards. The next flight he made seven takeoffs and landings without me touching anything and everything was to practical test standards. He made all his radio calls and the tower complimented me on his radio work. I demonstrated most things twice and he simply did it well. If it had been his check ride or proficiency check I feel he would have passed.

There are equally challenging and close to the same amount of fun.

Someone who already has a pilot’s certificate bypasses a lot of required training because the FAA assumes he already understands the weather, knows how to plan and execute a cross country flight and understands airspace. If he is a proficient pilot I may not have to teach him the aviation culture of risk mitigation. For sport pilot he doesn’t need any solo time if he has a pilot’s certificate.

Thank you Vance.

One of the reasons I ask is because being an aviation enthusiast in general and having stayed the full week at AirVenture many times, I'm on EAA's list for attending their next Sport Pilot Academy, hopefully come Spring 2017. For me, getting my SP training at Osh would be a dream come true. It's fixed wing of coarse (Cessna 162's) so Gyro would be an add on to that. I was just curious how pilots with a primarily fixed wing background faired in Gyro.
 

Vance

Gyroplane CFI
Joined
Oct 30, 2003
Messages
16,529
Location
Nipomo,California
Aircraft
Givens Predator
Total Flight Time
2400+ in rotorcraft
A good plan.

A good plan.

Thank you Vance.

One of the reasons I ask is because being an aviation enthusiast in general and having stayed the full week at AirVenture many times, I'm on EAA's list for attending their next Sport Pilot Academy, hopefully come Spring 2017. For me, getting my SP training at Osh would be a dream come true. It's fixed wing of coarse (Cessna 162's) so Gyro would be an add on to that. I was just curious how pilots with a primarily fixed wing background faired in Gyro.

Some here feel that getting your fixed wing first is an easier, less expensive way to get your gyroplane rating.

If you came to me with a fixed wing Sport Pilot certificate without a lot of experience it is fairly easy to teach you the difference in the takeoff and the steep approach to land.

You would not need solo time, cross country, a knowledge test and I only need to train you to proficiency and find another sport pilot CFI to agree that you are proficient.

I feel that some of the above that you don’t have to do makes you a better gyroplane pilot when you do them.

Cross country flight planning and execution is different in a gyroplane compared to a fixed wing.

I feel solo time in your gyroplane under the supervision of a flight instructor has value.

I feel it is wonderful that you have so many choices Mike.
 

TenSeven

Newbie
Joined
Nov 3, 2016
Messages
13
Location
Carlsbad
Some here feel that getting your fixed wing first is an easier, less expensive way to get your gyroplane rating.

If you came to me with a fixed wing Sport Pilot certificate without a lot of experience it is fairly easy to teach you the difference in the takeoff and the steep approach to land.

You would not need solo time, cross country, a knowledge test and I only need to train you to proficiency and find another sport pilot CFI to agree that you are proficient.

I feel that some of the above that you don’t have to do makes you a better gyroplane pilot when you do them.

Cross country flight planning and execution is different in a gyroplane compared to a fixed wing.

I feel solo time in your gyroplane under the supervision of a flight instructor has value.

I feel it is wonderful that you have so many choices Mike.

Thank you Vance, I appreciate it.
 
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