N975CD MTOsport - Easton, Maryland - 13.10.23

Steve_UK

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I'm not a pilot but have been lucky enough to fly in Mi-24 Hind, Mi-2, Mi-17, Lynx HAS3, Gliders, GA
The FAA ASIAS tells us - I started fresh thread as the earlier initial one has drifted over to gyro mustering in Australia - hopefully this can keep on track.

"departing for unknown reason"...............

Brand new Type Certified version - FAA suggests still owned by AGUSA ( but FAA paperwork maybe yet to catch up - - injusry shown as serious - damage substantial


IDENTIFICATION
Date:13-OCT-23
Time:17:00:00Z
Regis#:N975CD
Aircraft Make:ROTORSPORT UK
Aircraft Model:MTOSPORT
Event Type:ACCIDENT
Highest Injury:SERIOUS
Aircraft Missing:No
Damage:SUBSTANTIAL
LOCATION
City:EASTON
State:MARYLAND
Country:UNITED STATES
DESCRIPTION
Description:AIRCRAFT CRASHED WHILE DEPARTING FOR UNKNOWN REASONS, EASTON, MD.
 
*Previously* owned by AGUSA (AutoGyro USA), which has a US HQ, sales, and training operation at Easton and run by Bob Synder (located there temporarily as their permanent HQ at Bay Bridge Airport is suspended while the runway is being repaired). The gyro's new *real* owner was departing Easton to fly his brand new ship home.
 
I feel awful - as always when an owner balls up their beautiful machine!
Sorry to hear of the serious injury to pilot -they must have done a proper royal-screw-up ...barring OTHER reasons than the usual TO errors in a gyro for new solo/ FW transitioned pilots.

Also for their CFI ...who SURELY is going:eek::unsure: ..."how were they NOT ready to handle solo flight???" ..DID they need MORE TIME to get all those muscle memory routines SOLID!!!????

SO many ??'s ....another FW transitioned pilot that "brain-farted" & screwed up the TO sequence????
...so excited to be taking his new machine home he had a "climate-change-stress-induced" ':sneaky: medical event???

The same ole hamster - the same ole wheel!! - AGAIN!!!!

On a selfish note - for the rest of us that can still get insurance - I HOPE ...the owner was self-insured & NOT going to impact the already horrendous gyro -insurance stats!:mad::poop:
 
I feel awful - as always when an owner balls up their beautiful machine!
Sorry to hear of the serious injury to pilot -they must have done a proper royal-screw-up ...barring OTHER reasons than the usual TO errors in a gyro for new solo/ FW transitioned pilots.

Also for their CFI ...who SURELY is going:eek::unsure: ..."how were they NOT ready to handle solo flight???" ..DID they need MORE TIME to get all those muscle memory routines SOLID!!!????

SO many ??'s ....another FW transitioned pilot that "brain-farted" & screwed up the TO sequence????
...so excited to be taking his new machine home he had a "climate-change-stress-induced" ':sneaky: medical event???

The same ole hamster - the same ole wheel!! - AGAIN!!!!

On a selfish note - for the rest of us that can still get insurance - I HOPE ...the owner was self-insured & NOT going to impact the already horrendous gyro -insurance stats!:mad::poop:
There have been some challenges with the Rotax 915 IS that have led to the engine going quiet in flight.

It happened to a friend of mine resulting in an off airport landing at Bensen Days.

In an unfamiliar aircraft the startle factor (time to figure out the reason for the quiet and figuring out what to do) tends to be longer.

An engine out on takeoff is a possibility.

Hopefully we will learn more from the NTSB final report or from gossip and speculation.

The accident pilot's CFI will hear from the FAA and have some explaining to do.
 
In an unfamiliar aircraft the startle factor (time to figure out the reason for the quiet and figuring out what to do) tends to be longer.
I would assume the aircraft would have been well tested (by CFI/sales rep) prior to - a new pilot taking off to his home airport!

Usually there is a decent chunk of transition-training -time in ones OWN aircraft - to become well familiar prior to a solo flight home!

Engine-out on TO /climb-out ....IS A VERY TRAINABLE ROUTINE - especially in the fast-land & no-roll gyro .....several times Desmon "Startled me" by pulling throttle to idle as we were taking off & said LAND-IT!!!

Any CFI that does NOT train for this is doing their student pilot a terrible dis-service!

OH HELL ..are we back to reaping the harvest of the "hushed-up" make-a-sale - minimal-training - push-em out. mentality of certain E & W coast AGents????? :mad:
 
Chris:

Wait and see what the report says. I'm hoping this is not the case,!
 
Sorry to hear of the new owner's serious injury. Hope he will recover fully and we will be able to learn something.
 
Update - the NTSB Preliminary states

"
On October 13, 2023, at 1300 eastern daylight time, a Rotorsport Uk Ltd Mtosport 2017
gyroplane, N975CD, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident at Easton
Airport/Newman Field (ESN), Easton, Maryland. The pilot was seriously injured. The airplane
was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight.
The pilot was a former military helicopter pilot and had stopped flying for about 18 years. He
recently returned to flying and decided that a gyroplane was the easiest and most economical
transition. The pilot conducted gyroplane training in the Mtsoport 2017 from a local distributor
(who was also a flight instructor) and then purchased a new gyroplane directly from the
factory. The gyroplane was delivered in September 2023.
Before the pilot took delivery of the gyroplane, he conducted two flights with the flight
instructor/distributor for a total of about 1 hour of dual instruction. The pilot said the gyroplane
flew “beautifully…like a Ferrari.” He took official delivery of the gyroplane and then decided to
fly the gyroplane to his home in Virginia that same day.
The pilot said that before he departed, he performed the abbreviated preflight checklist, which
included checking the flight controls, and found no issues. He then started the gyroplane and
taxied to the active runway, where he performed the before-takeoff checklist. There were no
issues with the flight controls during the taxi or take-off check.
The pilot then departed runway 4. He said he pre-rotated to 200 rpm and the gyroplane began
to roll forward. Once he got “wheel balance”, he increased rpm, and the gyroplane lifted off the
ground. When the gyroplane was about 5 ft above the runway, it made an uncommanded 30°
yaw to the right. He tried to correct with full left pedal, but there was no response. The pilot
said his only option was to reject the takeoff. He reduced power, pushed the nose forward,
then pulled the controls back in an attempt to make a soft landing. The pilot stated that the
main rotor blades flapped, and that he could not recall if the gyroplane then rolled left or right
before it “dropped” vertically about 15-20 ft to the ground. After the gyroplane came to a stop,
the pilot manually turned off the engine.
The pilot did not know why the gyroplane yawed but recalled that the control stick stayed in his
hand, and he felt no feedback in the rudder pedals. He further stated that there were no birds in
the vicinity and the wind was calm.
A postaccident examination of the gyroplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)
aviation safety inspector found no preaccident discrepancies or mechanical malfunctions that
would have precluded normal operation of the flight controls."

Ref Accident Number: ERA24LA008
 
Update - the NTSB Preliminary states

"
On October 13, 2023, at 1300 eastern daylight time, a Rotorsport Uk Ltd Mtosport 2017
gyroplane, N975CD, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident at Easton
Airport/Newman Field (ESN), Easton, Maryland. The pilot was seriously injured. The airplane
was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight.
The pilot was a former military helicopter pilot and had stopped flying for about 18 years. He
recently returned to flying and decided that a gyroplane was the easiest and most economical
transition. The pilot conducted gyroplane training in the Mtsoport 2017 from a local distributor
(who was also a flight instructor) and then purchased a new gyroplane directly from the
factory. The gyroplane was delivered in September 2023.
Before the pilot took delivery of the gyroplane, he conducted two flights with the flight
instructor/distributor for a total of about 1 hour of dual instruction. The pilot said the gyroplane
flew “beautifully…like a Ferrari.” He took official delivery of the gyroplane and then decided to
fly the gyroplane to his home in Virginia that same day.
The pilot said that before he departed, he performed the abbreviated preflight checklist, which
included checking the flight controls, and found no issues. He then started the gyroplane and
taxied to the active runway, where he performed the before-takeoff checklist. There were no
issues with the flight controls during the taxi or take-off check.
The pilot then departed runway 4. He said he pre-rotated to 200 rpm and the gyroplane began
to roll forward. Once he got “wheel balance”, he increased rpm, and the gyroplane lifted off the
ground. When the gyroplane was about 5 ft above the runway, it made an uncommanded 30°
yaw to the right. He tried to correct with full left pedal, but there was no response. The pilot
said his only option was to reject the takeoff. He reduced power, pushed the nose forward,
then pulled the controls back in an attempt to make a soft landing. The pilot stated that the
main rotor blades flapped, and that he could not recall if the gyroplane then rolled left or right
before it “dropped” vertically about 15-20 ft to the ground. After the gyroplane came to a stop,
the pilot manually turned off the engine.
The pilot did not know why the gyroplane yawed but recalled that the control stick stayed in his
hand, and he felt no feedback in the rudder pedals. He further stated that there were no birds in
the vicinity and the wind was calm.
A postaccident examination of the gyroplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)
aviation safety inspector found no preaccident discrepancies or mechanical malfunctions that
would have precluded normal operation of the flight controls."

Ref Accident Number: ERA24LA008

I am glad he is alive and somewhat ok. So the rotor blades flapped on his attempt of soft landing. Ok. Got it.
Of course, I would bet there are no jammed controls or broken rudder cable or anything either.
18 years of not flying ... basically you are new to flying. Most likely above 70 years of age. He needed a good 40 to 60 hours of training.
 
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Abid
I have difficulty understanding how he "flapped/sailed" the rotor.
He pre rotated to 200 rpm.
he accelerated slowly
he wheel balanced so I suppose the nose wheel left the ground.
He increased rpm (I presume he means engine rpm)
he had enough Rrpm to climb to 5 ft
then he reduced power (hence forward speed)
he lowered the nose hence reduced disc angle of attack but a slight Rrpm decrease but very slight because
he then pulled the stick back
and flapped/sailed the rotor.
I may be wrong so I'd be interested to hear your explanation how he did that.

If I was a betting man I'd say this was a too steep initial climb and a behind the curve flight into the runway, a bit like the Arrowcopter that flew into the hanger.

Was this a 915 MTO?
Was his 2017 MTO training in a 915 MTO?
Within the 1 hour conversion training did he actually fly this gyro solo?

Mike G
 
I know I sound like a broken record but if he had a GWS on board we'd know what happened, it might have even helped him.
We wouldn't have to rely on the the pilot's:
memory,
lack of memory,
imagination,
not telling us what he doesn't want us to know.

Reading about these accidents is so frustrating for me to think that I spent the last 4 years developing an answer and the manufacturers (and most pilots) aren't interested.

I'm about to give up.

Mike G
 
1 hour of dual instruction and then he wanted to fly home🙄 🤔
Then….. rotor flapped? Sounds like a rotor not up to speed before rotating. Hmmmmmm 🤔
 
Just sounds pure scarry and Ill advised to me.
 
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Abid
I have difficulty understanding how he "flapped/sailed" the rotor.
He pre rotated to 200 rpm.
he accelerated slowly
he wheel balanced so I suppose the nose wheel left the ground.
He increased rpm (I presume he means engine rpm)
he had enough Rrpm to climb to 5 ft
then he reduced power (hence forward speed)
he lowered the nose hence reduced disc angle of attack but a slight Rrpm decrease but very slight because
he then pulled the stick back
and flapped/sailed the rotor.
I may be wrong so I'd be interested to hear your explanation how he did that.

If I was a betting man I'd say this was a too steep initial climb and a behind the curve flight into the runway, a bit like the Arrowcopter that flew into the hanger.

Was this a 915 MTO?
Was his 2017 MTO training in a 915 MTO?
Within the 1 hour conversion training did he actually fly this gyro solo?

Mike G

Hi Mike
Exactly. He did not flap/sail the rotor blades. He was behind the curve with nose way high at full power and he over corrected the left yawing tendency by right pedal input. It wasn't no un-commanded yaw to the right. Un-commanded it would yaw left at full power and nose high attitude.
That is why I said somewhat sarcastically "Got it". I am sure you remember from some other forum posters flying Magni M24 Plus (915iS engine) that they were running out of right rudder input on takeoff and initial climb out. Meaning they were already shoving full right rudder input in and thought it needed even more. They didn't. It was just very bad takeoff technique on their part with nose high attitude.

I don't know off hand but I am going to bet this was Rotax 915iS powered machine and this guy was not ready to solo it. Plain and simple.
I will also bet he is old like 70+. 18 years of not flying; you bet he needed 40 to 60 hours of training to be competent and safe. Again these are harsh realities and there are always exceptions but nobody wants to listen or heed and yet insurance companies know very well. This isn't even just a gyroplane thing it is an aviation thing. If you are flying a 182 forever, you are ok staying with a 182 but if you decide to change to a Harmon Rocket at that age, you are going to have similar issues and when you aren't flying anything for 18 years ... well all bets are off.

So yeah I'll likely bet with you on this and before anyone go pouncing these 915's are dangerous. They aren't. The people are dangerous. Learn to fly, properly. Spend the right time and don't be cocky. The alternative can put you 6 foot underground. Choose wisely.
 
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1 hour of dual instruction and then he wanted to fly home🙄 🤔
Then….. rotor flapped? Sounds like a rotor not up to speed before rotating. Hmmmmmm 🤔

Doubt the rotor flapped. Really really doubt it. In fact I am 99.99% sure it didn't flap.
 
UMMMMM????? Did I call it? - in post #5????

"OH HELL ..are we back to reaping the harvest of the "hushed-up" make-a-sale - minimal-training - push-em out. mentality of certain E & W coast AGents????? :mad: " :unsure:

His gyro-TO muscle -memory was NOT SOLID!!!
 
Even if the messenger (Dan G) is absolutely despised here & on other forums ...I have been listening to his latest AQP for general aviation presentation to an EAA group. ..The message HAS VALUE!
The scenario-based training for " the EVENTS in AVIATION that WILL SURPRISE us and IF we are unprepared WILL KILL!" I think has merit for us in the gyro community - we just need to get many CFI's on board to DO MORE than "just train to PTS minimums"!!!
 
The Bensen training manual had the student flying behind the power curve up and down the runway before ever flying the pattern. It's good practice to know what it looks and feels and sounds like and how to recover. It's also fun and unique to gyros.
 
1 hour of dual instruction and then he wanted to fly home🙄 🤔
Then….. rotor flapped? Sounds like a rotor not up to speed before rotating. Hmmmmmm 🤔
Sorry if I missed it but was he licensed to fly the gyro? Only thing I noticed was that he'd flown military helicopters. That does not necessarily translate to having been certified by the FAA in helis, let alone gyros.
 
Sorry if I missed it but was he licensed to fly the gyro? Only thing I noticed was that he'd flown military helicopters. That does not necessarily translate to having been certified by the FAA in helis, let alone gyros.
He did not need to have a a full license. He only needed a solo signoff and endorsement to fly the gyro alone.
I just did a N-Number search and this gyroplane indeed was a 915iS powered gyroplane and the registered owner is not to be found in FAA Airmen Registry so maybe he is not a FAA rated pilot at all. He probably was flying on a solo endorsement only and this was probably his first solo (alone) takeoff in that machine, and I would say clearly, he wasn't ready.
Gyroplanes aren't dangerous but they sure are made dangerous by the people getting involved in them. If I was advising the FAA, I would advise them to focus on things that affect pilot training and certification in a smart way that can result in a real change in those areas. I have not seen this level of lax attitude from instructors or students in any other category of light sport aircraft. I hate to say it, but other categories are a cut above gyroplane world in this regard. Although I have heard that in the last 5 or so years airplane pilots are getting signed off at commercial level in accelerated programs when they cannot properly execute a 15-knot crosswind landing either. So perhaps it is a wider problem but that is above my pay grade to analyze.
 
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