N316MG Magni M16 - Cape Giradeau - 29-5-20

Steve_UK

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I'm not a pilot but have been lucky enough to fly in Mi-24 Hind, Mi-2, Mi-17, Lynx HAS3, Gliders, GA
Latest FAA ASIAS reports the following, listed as 29-6-20 but assume they mean 29-5-20


AIRCRAFT CRASHED ON TAKEOFF, CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO.


Magni M16 N316MG - injuries minor, damage substantial


Appears to have a recent owner change in March 2020
 

Steve_UK

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I'm not a pilot but have been lucky enough to fly in Mi-24 Hind, Mi-2, Mi-17, Lynx HAS3, Gliders, GA
The local KFVS news has this



CAPE GIRARDEAU, Mo. (KFVS) - A two person Gyrocopter, a rotary-wing aircraft that is driven forward by a conventional propeller, crashed at the Cape Girardeau airport on May 29.

According to Sergeant Joey Hann, when the pilot was landing the craft, a light came on.

The pilot throttled back up, causing the gyrocopter to flip over.

There were no injuries.


 

Tyger

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The accident description in the local news seems to indicate it was landing, but it explains just about nothing.
 

ventana7

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In two and maybe three recent accidents the news reports are unclear if it was a take-off or landing. On one it actually said the pilot crashed on landing during take-off. I initially attributed it to the usual terrible reporting on aviation accidents- but now I'm wondering are these more crow hop accidents?

Rob
 

EI-GYRO

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If he was aborting a landing by going to full throttle, presumably that would cause a degree of torque roll to the right, and yaw to the left if uncorrected with rudder, and any subsequent contact with the runway would get very ugly. Presumably someone will correct me if my assumptions are incorrect.
 

Vance

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All four of the Magni M16s I have flown pitched nose down and yawed left when power was increased for a go around.

Lower indicated air speed exacerbated this response.

I do not recall a significant torque roll with the addition of power even at very low airspeeds.

I don’t have enough time in a Magni M 16 to separated reality from my impressions.

I specifically teach go arounds and did not find the maneuver particularly challenging or hazardous in a Magni M16.

The Magni M16 seemed like a wonderfully stable, forgiving platform.

With the very limited information available on this mishap it is impractical to guess what happened.

Writing in the most general terms about training clients to land; the time I feel at the greatest risk of damaging the gyroplane is when we have run out of airspeed and ideas before we run out of altitude particularly if we have drifted off the centerline.

Engine at idle landings exacerbate the challenge because our only tool to arrest the descent is airspeed and in my experience identifying when we have a challenge and adding power tends to come a little late for the low time pilot trying to learn to land without power because of the focus on the mission to land engine at idle.

I look forward to leaning more about this mishap and am grateful the pilot is ok.

The preliminary report usually includes the pilot’s description of the accident; at this time it does not.
 

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Tyger

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I agree with Vance: there is a bit of pitch down and some yaw with added power on the M-16, but not all that much torque roll. I have saved more than a few high flares with a bit of added power, but never felt like things were getting away from me.
I would definitely like to hear more details of what happened with this one.
 

DavePA11

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In the Sportcopter M912, a bad landing in the flare can be saved by adding power. There is enough power in the 912 to save some really bad landings too.
 

Vance

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In my opinion while landing any gyroplane I have two ways to arrest the descent. I can flare and convert my forward speed into arresting the descent or I can add power which makes a gyroplane descend more slowly.

I burst of power near the ground may be a last chance way to cushion the landing.

I feel a burst of power at touch down may become a bad habit and it not best practice.
 

chrisk

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I have lots of time in a Magni M-16. There is nothing particularly challenging about flying them. They are wonderful aircraft.

With respect to the "burst of power" at landing. As an instructor and letting students learn; sometimes they get a little slow and/or decide to flair high. A burst of power/go around is sometimes necessary to prevent a hard landing. I've never found the M16 to exhibit any bad behavior. And I agree with Vance, a burst of power at touchdown should not be a standard part of landing.

I did hear of a recent Magni M16 accident where the pilot landed long, attempted a go around, and flew behind the curve. Which of course means they couldn't climb, and they went off the runway.. This may have been this accident or another, since I heard the details 3rd hand. I have no knowledge about the pilot or who trained them.
 

Brent Drake

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This was the 3rd solo for a student. Had already landed on the runway a little long. tried to take off again and ran out of runway in the wet ground which caused it to tip over.
 

Philbennett

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Cape Girardeau Regional Airport covers an area of 557 acres (225 ha) at an elevation of 342 feet (104 m) above mean sea level. It has two runways: 10/28 is 6,500 by 150 feet (1,981 x 46 m) with a concrete surface; 2/20 is 3,997 by 100 feet (1,218 x 30 m) with an asphalt/concrete surface.

Had already landed on the runway a little long. tried to take off again and ran out of runway
Really???
 

thomasant

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Really!

"tried to take off again and ran out of runway in the wet ground which caused it to tip over".

The above is the full quote by Brent.

Phil's quote does not include the above details. Hence provides completely different inferences. One can infer that the crash occurred due to the running out of runway, or the wet ground that caused the tip over

IMHO, there can be a lot of inferences that get out of context if the complete quote is not given.
 

loftus

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Really!

"tried to take off again and ran out of runway in the wet ground which caused it to tip over".

The above is the full quote by Brent.

Phil's quote does not include the above details. Hence provides completely different inferences. One can infer that the crash occurred due to the running out of runway, or the wet ground that caused the tip over

IMHO, there can be a lot of inferences that get out of context if the complete quote is not given.
He had 4000 or even 6000 feet of concrete runway, so landing a 'little long' is a kind understatement with a necessary take off roll of 300-400 feet or so. I think this is what Phil is mostly inferring.
 
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Philbennett

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Indeed Loftus.

Edited to add. Sorry I can understand how my short post seems a little aggressive but what I'm driving at is this. Assuming that when we communicate its not in some long draw out riddle, where we drag each detail out over a series of posts. Therefore if the airfield details are broadly correct - 4000-6000ft of wet concrete - you have to either land SUPER long and run out of runway with a good technique OR you land a LITTLE long and have a poor technique OR you have a good technique executed poorly.

If the instructor is reading a suggestion for solo flights. Use a hand held radio and be prepared to give some sort of "knock it off" call AND/OR don't do touch and go landings until the student has more stick time. Touch and go landings with student and even low time pilots is a snag waiting to be muddled up. It has wrecked so much machinery over the years. As always I'm wearing the tin hat and waiting to be told how wrong I am in bullet point format.
 
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Brent Drake

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The info I gave you came from the owner of the Magni. I do not post frivolous crap.
 

WaspAir

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I have saved more than a few high flares with a bit of added power, but never felt like things were getting away from me.
In the Sportcopter M912, a bad landing in the flare can be saved by adding power. There is enough power in the 912 to save some really bad landings too.
... burst of power near the ground may be a last chance way to cushion the landing.

I feel a burst of power at touch down may become a bad habit and it not best practice.
Interesting - -
in the A&S18A, you can salvage from all sorts of ills in the last moments of landing with a touch of power, left stick, and right pedal all done together (the "when all else fails" last-ditch toolkit). The goal, of course, is never to be in a last-ditch situation.
 
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