MTOsport - N498AG - Texas - trees

Smack

Re-member?
Joined
Nov 3, 2013
Messages
548
Location
Georgetown
Aircraft
Kitfox IV / F1 Rocket / Magni M-16 / Beech 18
Total Flight Time
500+
You are correct to recognize that our infrastructure is at risk. Electrically, we are way too interconnected, IMHO.
I'm sure that some Californians can provide some first-hand experiences regarding what happens when the electricity isn't there !
Taking down the GPS constellation might be a tad more difficult. I got too close to the edge of a Presidential TFR once and watched as my GPS went haywire. Of course, I had a very good idea where I was, kept aviating, and didn't panic.
During a hostile nation/terrorist attack, I think a safe, precautionary landing is low on the 'worry list'. ;)
Brian
 

loftus

Active Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2013
Messages
916
Location
Ponce Inlet, Florida
Aircraft
Aircam
Total Flight Time
500 hours
I think it's smart always to carry a paper chart. There will come a day when the GPS constellation goes "down" and some folks will find themselves in a world of trouble. My biggest fear of terrorist (or hostile nation) attack is for our electric/electronic infrastructure.
In most of the apps on an iPhone or iPad such as iFly, one will not lose the map if one loses the GPS or if one does not have phone service, the map is already uploaded into your phone's memory and will be visible even without GPS. One will still have a moveable sectional map just like paper, except that it does not require folding or flipping to move from one area to the next. One simply moves the map with your finger, and also one can zoom in and out simply with finger gestures. As long as the phone turns on you have a sectional. I always travel with my phone and iPad plugged in to USB to remain charged, and on longer trips carry a backup battery. But sure, carrying a paper map as just one more backup is fine as well. Never tooo many backups.
If you want to test this just download the iFly trial to your phone or iPad and try it indoors where you can't get GPS.
 
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gyromike

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
Oct 29, 2003
Messages
3,740
Location
Abbeville, Louisiana
Aircraft
Bensen B8MG
Next, no matter what you are using for navigation, you should know your position at all times. To do otherwise is foolhardy at best. If you do know where you are, finding your position on a pre-folded chart once a display fails should be a pretty trivial task (after all, both the e-display and the chart are depicting the same landscape). In the time between failure of the device and checking the chart, you won't have gone very far at gyroplane speeds.
I agree. I learned to fly just before moving map GPS became common, and relied on paper maps.
After planning my flight, I always kept aware of wind direction and my general location.
"I'm 6 miles east of Wherever, and should be crossing river X in 15 minutes", etc.
I continued this practice with GPS.

I would still use paper maps and my E-6B whiz wheel in my Cessna 140.
My Garmin 496 was the backup. It actually failed on me when the internal backup battery died and it was taking forever to initialize it's position.

Map, stopwatch, and compass for the win. 😉
 

Vance

Gyroplane CFI
Joined
Oct 30, 2003
Messages
15,804
Location
Nipomo,California
Aircraft
Givens Predator
Total Flight Time
2200+ in rotorcraft
FLIGHT ADVISORY - GPS Interference Testing YUMA PROVING GROUNDS ARIZONA (YPG_AZ) 19-08

04 – 16 November 2019

I use paper as my primary navigation.
 

DavePA11

Active Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2015
Messages
363
Location
Northborough
I had my iPad go out while flying over unfamiliar territory in upstate NY due to he 12VDC plug vibrating out slightly where it didn’t make contact, and had to use paper sectional as back up in open cockpit. It’s not easy to pick up on a sectional if following on GPS. I was able to pick out some mountains as land marks which made it easier. Always have backup iPhone now if flying long cross counties.
Dave
 

loftus

Active Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2013
Messages
916
Location
Ponce Inlet, Florida
Aircraft
Aircam
Total Flight Time
500 hours
I had my iPad go out while flying over unfamiliar territory in upstate NY due to he 12VDC plug vibrating out slightly where it didn’t make contact, and had to use paper sectional as back up in open cockpit. It’s not easy to pick up on a sectional if following on GPS. I was able to pick out some mountains as land marks which made it easier. Always have backup iPhone now if flying long cross counties.
Dave
Part of my preflight is checking that all of my devices are fully charged, so that I am not reliant on the charging plugs. For me doing my flight planning at home in my armchair with my iPad has made the process even more fun. But then I am a bit of an app nerd. My process is to start with my radar and weather apps starting days ahead with My Radar and Windfinder or Windy. I presently plan mostly with iFly but may switch more to Foreflight in the future. For Android only there is Naviator. With any of these flight plans can be transferred to your back up devices before flight, and of course I can file, activate and close flight plans with these devices. Recently I've become a huge fan of NavMonster. It's incredibly simple to use - type in the waypoints of your route, or pull up an old route you've entered before, and in real time it gives me the info on if part or all of the route are VFR, graphic review of weather along the route and forecasts, METARS, TFR's TAF's, Winds Aloft, NOTAMS, Airport info and alternates with notification of whether they are VFR or IFR, Prog Charts and Radar Images. If I do happen to have phone service which I mostly do flying low in Central Florida, Nav Monster continues to update in flight so that any changes to VFR or IFR conditions at destination or alternate continue to update in real time. Just in the last few weeks it's been incredibly useful with our scattered cloudy and shower weather when I flew from Deland to Sebring and back. Many months of the year scud running is inevitable in Florida. These apps with ADS-B radar etc, really help keep me out of trouble. Can't recommend this free app enough, download it and play with it. The other aspect to these flight apps is post-flight analysis, where your flight track is recorded and even uploadable to satellites etc in real time , and even into an electronic logbook to replace the paper one which I started 2 years ago. Flight planning for me is much more fun than it ever was. Highly recommend just playing with all these apps at home in your chair, even if you still decide to use a paper chart in the cockpit. We've always said that a good pilot is always learning, you'll be amazed at how much you can learn with these apps.
 
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