modern single place gyros?

Hosko

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Rotax 912uls powered single seater.
 

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sanman

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Hi, I want to point out these newer "nanolight" aircraft that have been attracting attention:





Nanolight aircraft like these are called "sub-70" because they weigh less than 70kg. They use 2-stroke paramotor engines ranging from 10 to 25hp.

Note that they use a control bar to control the overhead wing, rather than a control stick.

Can't the control bar method of control work for a gyroplane as well?

Why couldn't a platform like this be converted or adapted into a very light Gyroplane?

Is it possible to have a Nanolight Gyro?
 

C. Beaty

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Criss-crossed seesaw rotors don't work very long before something breaks.
A seesaw rotor requires a flexible, low inertia mount to handle the periodic drag variation. The mount must be soft enough not to force inplane flexing of the rotor.
 

Brian Jackson

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Hi, I want to point out these newer "nanolight" aircraft that have been attracting attention:





Nanolight aircraft like these are called "sub-70" because they weigh less than 70kg. They use 2-stroke paramotor engines ranging from 10 to 25hp.

Note that they use a control bar to control the overhead wing, rather than a control stick.

Can't the control bar method of control work for a gyroplane as well?

Why couldn't a platform like this be converted or adapted into a very light Gyroplane?

Is it possible to have a Nanolight Gyro?
I believe the closest equivalent to a control bar such as this is the Overhead Stick of the early Bensen models. They're a rarity nowadays, but I'm doing a variation of that on my gyro.
 

sanman

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I believe the closest equivalent to a control bar such as this is the Overhead Stick of the early Bensen models. They're a rarity nowadays, but I'm doing a variation of that on my gyro.

I read Bensen switched from his original control bar to the conventional stick simply to appeal more to fixed wing pilots of the day.
But within the small gyro niche, what's wrong with the control bar? Is it inferior in any other ways?
Isn't it in a sense more reliable?


So I wonder why a triangle bar was used on that Krucker gyro model?
Were they just converting it from an existing flexwing trike, and so they used what came with it?
 

Brian Jackson

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I read Bensen switched from his original control bar to the conventional stick simply to appeal more to fixed wing pilots of the day.
But within the small gyro niche, what's wrong with the control bar? Is it inferior in any other ways?
Isn't it in a sense more reliable?



So I wonder why a triangle bar was used on that Krucker gyro model?
Were they just converting it from an existing flexwing trike, and so they used what came with it?
I'm not yet a gyro pilot but from an engineering standpoint I love the simplicity of a control bar vs. the chain of multiple rotating connections (failure points). A couple of caveats with a directly connected bar/stick are that its control input motions are inherently backwards from the standard keel-mounted joystick. I'm told this makes it hard for a pilot unfamiliar with this setup to transition into.

Another is that it's not a graceful design for gyros with a tall mast. The longer lever length makes it necessary to move your arm much further to achieve the same rotorhead tilt angle. A solution I'm using for my overhead stick is a reversing mechanism which does 2 things: 1). Uses the same input motion directions as a standard joystick, and 2). The reverser pivot acts as a lever fulcrum, with its location essentially "gearing down" the stick travel to a more manageable radius.

I have been told by experienced and knowledgeable members here to use a vertically oriented handle on the overhead stick so that it doesn't get confused for a traditional (non-reversed) overhead. This portion of my building adventure won't begin until the winter months but I'd love to see more discussion about it. Cierva used a reverser on his overhead as well so am glad this is a trodden path instead of undiscovered country.
 

ultracruiser41

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I've talked to them about it, and it might be a good option.
Hi Russell….. I’ve got a single place Avromania frame I can sell you if you’re interested. I had a radial mounted on it but will be using it for another project.
I can send pics….. it’s in great shape….includes instruments and has a sport copter head on it.
And we’re close by in NC 😁
Make me an offer 👍🏻

Barry
 

ultracruiser41

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Too many to count
Some pics.
 

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