modern single place gyros?

Hosko

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Rotax 912uls powered single seater.
 

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sanman

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Hi, I want to point out these newer "nanolight" aircraft that have been attracting attention:





Nanolight aircraft like these are called "sub-70" because they weigh less than 70kg. They use 2-stroke paramotor engines ranging from 10 to 25hp.

Note that they use a control bar to control the overhead wing, rather than a control stick.

Can't the control bar method of control work for a gyroplane as well?

Why couldn't a platform like this be converted or adapted into a very light Gyroplane?

Is it possible to have a Nanolight Gyro?
 

C. Beaty

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Criss-crossed seesaw rotors don't work very long before something breaks.
A seesaw rotor requires a flexible, low inertia mount to handle the periodic drag variation. The mount must be soft enough not to force inplane flexing of the rotor.
 

Brian Jackson

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Hi, I want to point out these newer "nanolight" aircraft that have been attracting attention:





Nanolight aircraft like these are called "sub-70" because they weigh less than 70kg. They use 2-stroke paramotor engines ranging from 10 to 25hp.

Note that they use a control bar to control the overhead wing, rather than a control stick.

Can't the control bar method of control work for a gyroplane as well?

Why couldn't a platform like this be converted or adapted into a very light Gyroplane?

Is it possible to have a Nanolight Gyro?
I believe the closest equivalent to a control bar such as this is the Overhead Stick of the early Bensen models. They're a rarity nowadays, but I'm doing a variation of that on my gyro.
 

sanman

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I believe the closest equivalent to a control bar such as this is the Overhead Stick of the early Bensen models. They're a rarity nowadays, but I'm doing a variation of that on my gyro.

I read Bensen switched from his original control bar to the conventional stick simply to appeal more to fixed wing pilots of the day.
But within the small gyro niche, what's wrong with the control bar? Is it inferior in any other ways?
Isn't it in a sense more reliable?


So I wonder why a triangle bar was used on that Krucker gyro model?
Were they just converting it from an existing flexwing trike, and so they used what came with it?
 

Brian Jackson

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I read Bensen switched from his original control bar to the conventional stick simply to appeal more to fixed wing pilots of the day.
But within the small gyro niche, what's wrong with the control bar? Is it inferior in any other ways?
Isn't it in a sense more reliable?



So I wonder why a triangle bar was used on that Krucker gyro model?
Were they just converting it from an existing flexwing trike, and so they used what came with it?
I'm not yet a gyro pilot but from an engineering standpoint I love the simplicity of a control bar vs. the chain of multiple rotating connections (failure points). A couple of caveats with a directly connected bar/stick are that its control input motions are inherently backwards from the standard keel-mounted joystick. I'm told this makes it hard for a pilot unfamiliar with this setup to transition into.

Another is that it's not a graceful design for gyros with a tall mast. The longer lever length makes it necessary to move your arm much further to achieve the same rotorhead tilt angle. A solution I'm using for my overhead stick is a reversing mechanism which does 2 things: 1). Uses the same input motion directions as a standard joystick, and 2). The reverser pivot acts as a lever fulcrum, with its location essentially "gearing down" the stick travel to a more manageable radius.

I have been told by experienced and knowledgeable members here to use a vertically oriented handle on the overhead stick so that it doesn't get confused for a traditional (non-reversed) overhead. This portion of my building adventure won't begin until the winter months but I'd love to see more discussion about it. Cierva used a reverser on his overhead as well so am glad this is a trodden path instead of undiscovered country.
 

ultracruiser41

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I've talked to them about it, and it might be a good option.
Hi Russell….. I’ve got a single place Avromania frame I can sell you if you’re interested. I had a radial mounted on it but will be using it for another project.
I can send pics….. it’s in great shape….includes instruments and has a sport copter head on it.
And we’re close by in NC 😁
Make me an offer 👍🏻

Barry
 

ultracruiser41

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Some pics.
 

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Yozaburo Imai

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Hi Brian,

Thanks for all the comments. A 912UL is a mission requirement, since I already have one, so that generally takes me out of the plans built models I've seen. I'm not completely opposed to making a tall tail single place Dominator, and I do have all the parts, but it's probably not my first choice. Like you, I'd love to have a folding mast.

I've built a bunch of planes, but only one Dominator long ago. Since I'm certainly not an expert designer, or gyro pilot, I'd be very hesitant to get too creative with the design. If I can find something that's a known working design that can be built from plans, that would be the best option.

Cheers,
Rusty
Hi, let me join into your conersation.
Do you know Air Command International will be coming up with their refreshed single place models hopefully sometime during 1st or 2nd quarter of 2022 ?
Their News Letter says the model consisit of 3 different models or complete basic open sky skelton model, a partially enclosed model like current model (?) and complete enclosed model. They originally planned to show them during 2021 Oshkosh Air Show, but changed their plan to show them at a later date to make more perfect presentation.
All may want to see them. One of keen interest will be their new model is designed based on what engine to use. 912, Hirth or whatever ?
Yozaburo from Tokyo, Japan
 

13brv3

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Thanks for the update on Air Command. It will be interesting to see what they come up with, and I signed up for their newsletter. I may still rebuild the single place Dominator first, but I haven't decided. Too many other projects in the way still.
Rusty
 

Yozaburo Imai

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Here is a JK2 Nano dealer in the US - www.flynanogyro.com
Nano is a part103 gyro. If you are interested please contact Jeff.
Can you buy NANO in kit form based on 51% build rule ?
My understanding is that the NANO is to be supplied in 3 or so assembly like main body, em;enage and rotor blade which are completely built and mostly finished. Are they still regarded as 51% kit ?
Thanks, Yozaburo
 

WaspAir

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Under U.S. rules, the 51% rule applies only to Experimental Amateur Built, N-numbered aircraft. A Part 103 ultralight does not get an N-number and is not limited by the EAB rules. That gyro could be sold fully assembled under 103 rules, but is shipped in a few pieces for ease of crating and transport (not to qualify as an EAB kit). You can fly it legally without ever qualifying it as Experimental Amateur Built.
 
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LPM

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Under U.S. rules, the 51% rule applies only to Experimental Amateur Built, N-numbered aircraft. A Part 103 ultralight does not get an N-number and is not limited by the EAB rules. That gyro could be sold fully assembled under 103 rules, but is shipped in a few pieces for ease of crating and transport (not to qualify as an EAB kit). You can fly it legally without ever qualifying it as Experimental Amateur Built.
This is true.

For now Nano is selling as a complete gyro. Profesionally build. Fly and adjusted in factory. Comes to you in a few peaces easy and quick to assembly.
 
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