Mini 500 Bravo

Brent Smith

Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2014
Messages
72
Location
Auburn, CA
Auburn, CA, EAA Chapter 526 offers a Mini 500 Bravo helicopter for sale. The aircraft is serial number 470 out of 500 with all factory upgrades available at that time including the mast support system and PEP tuned exhaust. It received its airworthiness certificate in July of 1999, was last flown in October 2009 and has 62.5 hours on the Hobbs. During flight testing, several additional upgrades were made including oillite control rod bushings, installation of tapered roller pinion bearings and a capacitance fuel tank sender. Most notably, an exhaust driven turbocharger has been added but there are no entries in the logs to suggest that it was flown or even run with the turbo. The aircraft was donated to the Chapter with a valuation of $15,000. Please contact Brent, Chapter representative, at [email protected] for questions or more detailed information.
 

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DennisFetters

Gold Supporter
Joined
Jul 18, 2005
Messages
3,305
Location
Abu Dhabi UAE
Aircraft
582 Commander Elite
Total Flight Time
Stopped counting years ago after 5,000
That is an interesting way to install a turbo on the end of the exhaust outlet. I would like to know more about that and see some more detailed pictures.

The only problem I see is we found by reducing exhaust back pressure ( using the PEP exhaust did that) reduced the EGT sensitivity so we didn't have to jet to every little change in atmospheric pressure. This would definitely increase the exhaust pressure.
 

Brent Smith

Member
Joined
Mar 14, 2014
Messages
72
Location
Auburn, CA
Interesting response, Dennis. The builder added the turbo because his field elevation in Utah was over 4,000' and he was regularly experiencing density altitudes much higher. The weight of the turbo, though not excessive, did adversely affect the aircraft's balance. He had added nearly 20# of lead shot to the top of the instrument pod in trying to compensate. Since there were no log book entries about flying with the turbo, no clue as to how effective it actually was. I've attached another picture of the turbine.
 

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