Magni M24 - N648CM - South Dakota - prop

Steve_UK

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Oct 15, 2010
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I'm not a pilot but have been lucky enough to fly in Mi-24 Hind, Mi-2, Mi-17, Lynx HAS3, Gliders, GA
The FAA ASIAS shows

IDENTIFICATION
Date:30-DEC-23
Time:18:05:00Z
Regis#:N648CM
Aircraft Make:MAGNI GYRO
Aircraft Model:M24 ORION
Event Type:INCIDENT
Highest Injury:NONE
Aircraft Missing:No
Damage:UNKNOWN
LOCATION
City:TEA
State:SOUTH DAKOTA
Country:UNITED STATES
DESCRIPTION
Description:AIRCRAFT PROPELLER HAD BROKEN FROM THE 4-BLADE SYSTEM, TEA. SD.
 
That was me. Scary day after flying uneventfully for 20 minutes a tremendous vibration started and I lost some power. Thought for sure I was going down and notified the tower in Sioux Falls. After seeing a few power lines I noted I was holding altitude and had some control and managed to get to my airport 3 miles away. The vibration was so severe I could not really hear the tower and even seeing clearly was a chore. Landed ok and shut it down.

I had the rear cowling off as I was going to do an oil change. Mark Sprigg thinks something must have flown off the engine. I can find nothing missing. Other times I have had something go through the prop every blade was in some way affected. My other blades all look pristine.
 

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Thank you for the useful information Doctordantodd.

A great story well told.

Well done with a desirable outcome.

I recall practicing often for an emergency and wondering if I would handle the real thing well.

Congratulations and welcome to the club.

Sometimes things can shake hard enough to shake things loose or break things and it may be best to shut her down and land to avoid an in-flight fire.

One of our best flight instructors I know chucked a blade in flight and shook the carburetors loose and caught fire. There was not time to shut the engine as she was busy making a downwind emergency landing. It all ended well with no injuries.
 
Dan, thanks for the insight and very glad to hear that you and your M24 returned safely.
 
Thank you for the useful information Doctordantodd.

A great story well told.

Well done with a desirable outcome.

I recall practicing often for an emergency and wondering if I would handle the real thing well.

Congratulations and welcome to the club.

Sometimes things can shake hard enough to shake things loose or break things and it may be best to shut her down and land to avoid an in-flight fire.

One of our best flight instructors I know chucked a blade in flight and shook the carburetors loose and caught fire. There was not time to shut the engine as she was busy making a downwind emergency landing. It all ended well with no injuries.
Yea, I worry that there may be some serious damage from all the vibration. My dash compass shook loose and a lot of screws vibrated out. I could certainly second guess that decision to return to the airport.
 
Yea, I worry that there may be some serious damage from all the vibration. My dash compass shook loose and a lot of screws vibrated out. I could certainly second guess that decision to return to the airport.
Things to check after a hard shake.

Check the engine mounts and exhaust for cracks.

Check that the carburetor mount is tight.

Check the gas tank for leaks.

Check the electrical connections.

Check for clearance on everything.

Check the fasteners for proper torque.

Have someone else check her over too.
 
Questio
Things to check after a hard shake.

Check the engine mounts and exhaust for cracks.

Check that the carburetor mount is tight.

Check the gas tank for leaks.

Check the electrical connections.

Check for clearance on everything.

Check the fasteners for proper torque.

Have someone else check her over too.
 
Lower engine mounts look like the rubber needs replacing. It is a Rotax 915, I suspect I will need to have it looked over. Dash compass came loose and scratched up my windshield.72575338822__2AFDC992-B71D-46AD-AB43-56B9014148D0.jpg
 
Question for smart people: Is it possible for something to go through the prop and do this damage without any damage to any of the other blades? I have had a go pro and a passengers sunglasses go through the prop and there was some damage on each and every propeller blade.
 
Question for smart people: Is it possible for something to go through the prop and do this damage without any damage to any of the other blades? I have had a go pro and a passengers sunglasses go through the prop and there was some damage on each and every propeller blade.
If it was mine I would contact DUC and send the whole prop assembly to them to inspect and repair as necessary unless they say different.
 
Dan,

Seriously consider this event as a "prop strike". Meaning as if the tip of the prop hit the ground. Therefore, the gearbox and the crankshaft will most likely need to be replaced. A certified Rotax engine repair facility is the only place that can determine this to be so or not.

As you know and certainly felt in your own body, severe vibration will resonate throughout the entire airframe. As Vance has mentioned and I will add to his list, check all welds throughout the airframe beyond the engine mount.

Wayne
 
Question for smart people: Is it possible for something to go through the prop and do this damage without any damage to any of the other blades? I have had a go pro and a passengers sunglasses go through the prop and there was some damage on each and every propeller blade.
In my experience it is possible for something to go through the propeller and not do any damage.

In my experience it is not uncommon to have only one blade damaged from an impact, despite this I would check all of the blades carefully

I was using a composite propeller that had a small nick in a propeller blade and after a flight a large portion of the blade was gone.

Yours looks a lot like mine did.

I have seen composite blades delaminate along the parting line.

A pusher propeller lives in a very hostile environment and it can cause challenges if everything isn’t right.
 
I picked up an AN bolt (fod) on the ramp and put a nasty scar in the leading edge of only one blade on my three blade controllable Hartzell on my J-2.
 
Question for smart people: Is it possible for something to go through the prop and do this damage without any damage to any of the other blades? I have had a go pro and a passengers sunglasses go through the prop and there was some damage on each and every propeller blade.
I have had rocks go through and only hit one blade out of three.

wolfy
 
Question for smart people: Is it possible for something to go through the prop and do this damage without any damage to any of the other blades? I have had a go pro and a passengers sunglasses go through the prop and there was some damage on each and every propeller blade.
If a soft object, like a bird hit the blade hard enough to break it, the process of it deflecting and being crushed could effect only one blade...
Did you feel an initial impact? Any spatter on the tail, or other blades?
Incidentally, A small bird should not have broken a blade, so whatever hit it had some mass, or hardness, or both...
Or it could have had a void, or dry layup, but they probably use pre-preg and bake it off in an autoclave.....
 
Dan,

Seriously consider this event as a "prop strike". Meaning as if the tip of the prop hit the ground. Therefore, the gearbox and the crankshaft will most likely need to be replaced. A certified Rotax engine repair facility is the only place that can determine this to be so or not.

As you know and certainly felt in your own body, severe vibration will resonate throughout the entire airframe. As Vance has mentioned and I will add to his list, check all welds throughout the airframe beyond the engine mount.

Wayne
Not what I wanted to hear, but good advice.
 
Thank you for the useful information Doctordantodd.

A great story well told.

Well done with a desirable outcome.

I recall practicing often for an emergency and wondering if I would handle the real thing well.

Congratulations and welcome to the club.

Sometimes things can shake hard enough to shake things loose or break things and it may be best to shut her down and land to avoid an in-flight fire.

One of our best flight instructors I know chucked a blade in flight and shook the carburetors loose and caught fire. There was not time to shut the engine as she was busy making a downwind emergency landing. It all ended well with no injuries.
Thank you Vance! Britta was at 300 feet on TO when the prop hub broke. Part of the hub or a blade struck one rotor blade so hard that it put a “camel hump” in it. If it had been a composite rotor, I am not sure what the outcome would have been. The engine shook violently but shut off immediately because both carburetor’s were thrown off. A fuel fitting broke and caught fire.
Thank you for the useful information Doctordantodd.

A great story well told.

Well done with a desirable outcome.

I recall practicing often for an emergency and wondering if I would handle the real thing well.

Congratulations and welcome to the club.

Sometimes things can shake hard enough to shake things loose or break things and it may be best to shut her down and land to avoid an in-flight fire.

One of our best flight instructors I know chucked a blade in flight and shook the carburetors loose and caught fire. There was not time to shut the engine as she was busy making a downwind emergency landing. It all ended well with no injuries.
Thank you Vance. Britta was at 300 feet on TO with a new student in the front seat. The prop hub broke. A piece of the hub or a prop blade hit one rotor hard enough to bend the rotor into an upside down “V”. After it was all over, the rotor had a visible “camel hump” shape. The engine shook so hard that the carbs came off and the engine stopped. A fuel fitting broke and she was on fire all the way to the ground. The airport manager witnessed it -said it was “like a giant blow torch”. She had a 20 knot headwind and made a snap decision (the correct one) to do a right turn back to the runway. Left is the normal pattern, but that would have put her on top of the hangars next to 11. Straight ahead was a concrete drainage ditch crossing her path. Talk about quick thinking “under fire” - literally! We sent the engine to Ronnie Smith. He found a crack in the flywheel. We cleaned off all the fire extinguisher chemicals and soot, reinstalled the engine, new prop and new rotors. It is still flying today, but no is longer used as a training plane.
 
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