Kolibri's Korner -- a "blog" by a new RAF owner

Kolibri

FW and Gyros
Just replaced my RAF 2.2 starter after some 500+ hours.
NAPA #17242, which is for the 1990s Subaru Legacy with automatic transmission. (It matters.)
This corresponds with my my RAF Parts pdf showing #16887.
About $95.

The starter for the manual transmission is noticeably different, so take your core in to compare and confirm.

Just went up for a few laps around the pattern, after lots of flying my FW this weekend.
Am blessed to have both kinds of aircraft!

Regards,
Kolibri
 

Kolibri

FW and Gyros
Just replaced the pairs of wheel bearings in each main wheel.
They are 99502H, used commonly in many ag applications and easily available.
For example, Amazon sells them by the 10-pack for $29.95.

10 Sealed Bearing 99502H-2RS 5/8 x 1 3/8 x 7/16 inch Ball Bearings

They seem rather small for the application, so I'd recommend changing them often, especially if you do any rough-field work.
They brinell deform pretty easily.

While I was at it, I replaced the RAF OEM coarse thread wheel bolts with AN5-34A bolts, and AN nyloc axle nuts.

Regards,
Kolibri
 

EdL

Comm Rotor Gyro, ASEL
This is "brought over" from the AR-1 thread which devolved into a discussion about ground effect and strayed considerably from the OP, in my opinion. It seems more appropriate to carry it here to "Kolibri's Korner", since this appears to be a "Kolibri-only" issue. This way people can more easily disregard this if they wish.

Your post 173, Kolibri:

"Because the formula is for fixed-wing, not a rotor. The result would be analogous to "bumblebees cannot fly" after plugging in their wing area and horsepower, not accounting for wingtip vortices, unsteady state aerodynamics, etc.""

Interesting. Is that your analogy or that of a credible aeronautical engineer? Can you cite a credible aerodynamic source that says the formula is different? And if you can, can you ALSO show ground effect applies to rotors as well as fixed wing, since you're asserting there's both a difference in the formula but similarity in the effect? The formula, which you assert (without proof) is only for fixed-wings, appears to be independent of wing SPAN, wing SPEED, and even relative wind in the horizontal. It IS dependent on the ratio of height over chord. This all SUGGESTS it is no different for a rotor but I'm open to there being a difference - if you can substantiate it.


"Within the aviation community I enjoy, there is such a thing as pilot's honor. It would never occur to me to question that, without strong evidence. I am not a liar, and nobody's opinion (especially yours) of me is so valued that it merits self-betrayal of my principles."

Yet on this forum you've questioned other people's honor, opinion, etc. even though they're pilots. Does that mean you don't have this honor?

And as for lying, that requires willful intent to deceive. I'm not sure you're aware how incorrect you are, so I've never actually said you're a liar. Though, I think we would agree that if you WERE aware of your being mistaken then, as your quote says, your actions would no longer be honest.


"But shame on me",
Yes, EdL, shame on you.

Here we have another tool you've used frequently: taking others out of context. The rest of the statement was "I've allowed myself to get sucked in by trolling by someone who clearly has some emotional need to prove they're right..." Indeed - shame on me, as I say. I'll totally own that one.



Back to ground effect, you have yet to provide anything other than your own personal feelings that lift contributes to the effect. In fact, all you've done is throw up dirt, to include misquoting WaspAir, who took exception to talking about a "cushion of air" because the effect is from a decrease in induced drag, which may FEEL like a "cushion of air" about the same as taking off your parking brake while driving may FEEL like your engine is performing better. I agree with him: to talk about a "cushion of air" for gyros misleads one to believe the effect is due to additional lift, which your literature search has all but effectively excluded. In fact, I'd contend the calculator referenced above disproves it by NOT having variables for speed, wing length, or anything but wing shape, height/chord, and AoA. If you could substantiate your "feeling" after now over a month and over 164MB of collected data (can we agree you collected over 164MB of stuff?), you would have. "Somebody I know talked to somebody they know"...is laughable. You wouldn't accept that if I or someone else said "well, someone I know said someone they know, who's a renowned aerodynamics engineer, said lift is NOT involved for gyros" - nor should you.

/Ed
 

Kolibri

FW and Gyros
I've been noticing a high percentage of FW pilots with a leisurely attitude during takeoff, not climbing out at Vx or Vy, but being only 200' AGL at runway's end.
Also, I see a lot of midfield departures, intentionally forsaking 1000+ feet of runway.
While such casualness will usually work out, it's asking for trouble in the long run.

Even when flying my gyro, my takeoff procedure is to reach Vx during ground effect, and then climb out at 55 mph.
 

Kolibri

FW and Gyros
Am up to 526 hours in my RAF, and will be offering it for sale by this Fall.
Price will be in mid-$30k. PM me if interested for interim details.
 

Kolibri

FW and Gyros
I recently polished up the "glass" on my RAF with Meguiar's Mirror Glaze (fine), and the improvement in visibility was remarkable.
Used a cordless hand drill (slow rpm) and thick foam pad, buffing clean with microfiber cloth, then wiping with Plexus.

It's a highly recommended use of an hour or two. It feels like a new gyro from inside.

Regards,
Kolibri
 

Kolibri

FW and Gyros
plastic gas can caveat: They can easily build up a static electrical charge, and spark off from movement.

I recently was speaking with a friend who drug one across his tailgate (with plastic liner), and it made a 1/4" long and very loud POP!


Use a static discharge line, or ground yourself out by touching something safely away from the can.
 

Kolibri

FW and Gyros
from 2007: gyro crashed after turning downwind immediately after T/O

A good training video for how not to take-off.
Instead of achieving Vx in ground effect, and then turning into the wind,
the pilot allowed himself to be pushed laterally and then turned downwind at <50' AGL.

He still probably could have saved it if he'd not increased aft cyclic as he mushed in.
Glad he wasn't injured, though.
 

Kolibri

FW and Gyros
Department of Amateurs vs. the "Experts" (or, the child pointing out that the Emperor wears no clothes)
This is why multiple eyes are important on life-endangering matters:


Citicorp Center NYC skyscraper saved by a student’s question
The Citicorp Center repair is a classic engineering case study of how mistakes must be avoided in engineering and construction of public works. A skyscraper in New York City needed a unique structural system. While reviewing the design a student asked a question that made the engineer realize that a mistake had been made. There is a daring race to make the repairs for the building collapses. The video gives the details and then discusses how the engineer handled the situation.
On an interesting pride-saving note, the extensive internal buttressing was executed at night over months,
so not to inform/alarm the building occupants. Many dozens of welders were quietly involved, and their union.

Those using the building during the day were never informed that they were at risk from structural failure during high winds.


LeMessurier reportedly agonized over how to deal with the problem. If the issues were made known to the public, he risked ruining his professional reputation. He approached the architect (Hugh Stubbins) first, and then Citicorp. He advised them to take swift remedial action. Ultimately, he persuaded Citicorp to repair the building without informing the public, a task made easier by a then-ongoing press strike.

Architect Eugene Kremer has discussed the ethical questions raised in this case.
Kremer discusses six key points:
  1. Analysis of wind loads. Check all calculations and not rely just on building codes; these set minimum requirements and not the state of the art.
  2. Design changes. In this case change from welded to bolted connections. Changes are considered in the overall design context and by everyone involved and not a spur of the moment decision.
  3. Professional responsibility. To follow the codes of conduct for every chartered institution. LeMessurier did not consider the public safety first.
  4. Public statements. In this case the public statements issued by LeMessurier and Citigroup set out to mislead the public deliberately.
  5. Public safety. The public statement denied the public the right to ensure their own safety and to make their own critical decisions.
  6. Advancement of professional knowledge. Concealing this problem for almost 20 years prevented ethical and engineering learning that could have taken place.

People are generally motivated by one or more of these MICE factors:
Money
Ideology
Compromise
Ego

I post on this forum primarily about safety issues.
My reasons for doing so are 88.4% Ideology + 11.6% Ego. :)

Regards,
Kolibri
 
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Kolibri

FW and Gyros
For those using car gas 100% of the time, you c/should benefit from using synthetic engine oil.
With my occasional x/c 100LL, I used to use good synthetic blend and a Fram PH3593A, changing both every 25 hours.
Such is certainly acceptable, but I want to do better.

Also, use an excellent oil filter, such as the Bosch 3310 ($7) or Mobil1 M1-108A ($10).
Change every 35-50 hours.

For oil, I believe Castrol EDGE (5W-40) beats out Mobil 1, and this is what I'll switch to.

Regards,
Kolibri



EDGE 5W-40 for EJ22.png
 

All_In

Gold Supporter
Hi Kolibri
Where in this thread the solution to the old style fuel tanks that always leak? Or what do you recommend now?
 

Kolibri

FW and Gyros
How invigorating to see some people in this age are still thrumming with passion, and masculinity not misconflated as "toxic".


Awesome HAKA at a wedding reception
 
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Kolibri

FW and Gyros
Hi Kolibri
Where in this thread the solution to the old style fuel tanks that always leak? Or what do you recommend now?
Hi John,
Over 3 years ago I used 3M #04240 Semi-Rigid Plastic Repair.
First diegrind a channel in the crack or split, then seal. Working time is short, so prepare fully.
It's been holding up perfectly since then, and the only thing I found that could repair the RAF fiberglass fuel tanks.

Also, JB Wet Weld is pretty good, but 3M #04240 Semi-Rigid Plastic Repair is better.
 
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j4flyer

Member
Very well thought out and presented video. Very few people realize they moved the Think Tank from Germany to New York. Political Correctness was the first volley. It seems innocent enough but in reality it removes freedom of speech. Freedom of speech was established for speech that was disliked, not speech that pleases everyone. Now political correctness has been made into a violation of Law under the hate crimes act. We need to change hearts and minds not write laws. Great video Kolibri.
 
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