Interested in getting into gyros.

0712

Newbie
Joined
Apr 5, 2022
Messages
1
Location
Ohio
Hi everyone , I’m wanting to get into gyros. I have private pilot certification but haven’t been active forsome years. Built two ultralights in mid 90. Have seen a lot of used ones for sale And experiment ect.
don’t know about their safety records. Would like to maybe build from plans.
any advice or recommendations welcome. Thx
 

rcflier

Junior Member
Joined
May 24, 2007
Messages
537
Location
Nexø (Denmark)
Aircraft
Auto-Gyro MTO Sport 914 (upgraded MT-03)
Total Flight Time
65 as student - 2 as PIC
Welcome.

Flying a gyro is fun when done right.

It looks like you're a typical new member. Used to fly fixed wing and have now discovered gyros.

You have to know what you're getting into!

They fly a lot like fixed wing aircraft when aloft, but start and landing will bite you, if not done right.

Pro: Fun and rather agile. Landing run is short (if done correctly), so a safety landing is easier than with a fixed wing.

Con: If you screw up start or landing, the energy stored in the rotor will wreck the gyro. And the fixed wing behaviour you
remember so well is against you. Starting the takeoff run you may forget to pull the stick all the way back and then "rotate".
That happens too often. And never, ever ascend and then push the stick forward to level off - that unloads the rotor so it
loses RPM (bunt, power push over). Also, if the engine should stop, don't automatically push the stick fast forward.

You set only main wheels down when landing and they must point in the direction you're flying or you'll tip over -
remember the energy stored in the rotor. And look up "flapping" or "blade sailing". We have way too many start/landing accidents.

So, if you can remember that you fly the rotor and can forget some of your fixed wing programming, you'll have lots of fun.

The best way to discover what kind of gyro you want is to take some lessons in different gyros.

Myself, in 2017 I rented a gyro (with an instructor who wanted to go) for a tour with others on some island hopping in Denmark.

And a few years later I found a used gyro just like it (two place MTO Sport) at an attractive price in Sweden. It took me some
time to fix the things that needed fixing (new carbon rotor, new propeller, new radio and some small stuff) and I bought the
best helmet I could find. I started early summer last year, but had to stop for two reasons: I was running out of money because
of cost of full hull insurance (and rebuilding my house) and it would also soon be colder (open gyro). But we'll start up again
very soon, our jobs permitting. And I'll have my license this summer. When I feel comfortable flying it, I'll just have liability insurance.

So, get to know the rotor - what and why it's doing it's thing. Get an instructor who is really into gyros. Not a fixed winger
with some kind of add-on. It looks like all instructors may not be equally good.

But instructors are few and far between...same problem here. I now have to travel by ferry, bridge and then a ferry again.
Last year it was one ferry and two bridges. Quite a lot for Denmark, but your distances are much larger.

Flying gyro is a niche hobby. And you have come to the right place to ask questions.

Best wishes,
Erik
 
Last edited:

rcflier

Junior Member
Joined
May 24, 2007
Messages
537
Location
Nexø (Denmark)
Aircraft
Auto-Gyro MTO Sport 914 (upgraded MT-03)
Total Flight Time
65 as student - 2 as PIC
Yep. Gyro-Tech 8,4 meter. Hub 80mm wide, fits right in my Type1 tower.
RRPM between 320 and 400 (1 and 2 up, 420 RRPM max). Price was the same as Auto-Gyro Type 2 rotor.

I contacted an MTO pilot/owner from Austria, who was very positive.

So I took the chance and bought it. A few days ago I just saw a new Argon915 in Denmark, also with Gyro-Tech rotor...
 
Last edited:

rcflier

Junior Member
Joined
May 24, 2007
Messages
537
Location
Nexø (Denmark)
Aircraft
Auto-Gyro MTO Sport 914 (upgraded MT-03)
Total Flight Time
65 as student - 2 as PIC
I bought my gyro used in Sweden, so I had to have it checked anyway.

Someone made a dent in the Type1 rotor, so I wanted to try something different (read the UK paper).

And the propeller skin had loosened from the inner foam, so I didn't dare use it. Bought Aero Prop - works great.

The radio had become obsolete, so a new one was needed. And we had to work at the pneumatics.

I just bought new tires and tubes - but all considered, still a good buy.

Upgraded my avatar at last...
 

'cycleflyer

Junior Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2007
Messages
54
Location
Seneca sc
Welcome.

Flying a gyro is fun when done right.

It looks like you're a typical new member. Used to fly fixed wing and have now discovered gyros.

You have to know what you're getting into!

They fly a lot like fixed wing aircraft when aloft, but start and landing will bite you, if not done right.

Pro: Fun and rather agile. Landing run is short (if done correctly), so a safety landing is easier than with a fixed wing.

Con: If you screw up start or landing, the energy stored in the rotor will wreck the gyro. And the fixed wing behaviour you
remember so well is against you. Starting the takeoff run you may forget to pull the stick all the way back and then "rotate".
That happens too often. And never, ever ascend and then push the stick forward to level off - that unloads the rotor so it
loses RPM (bunt, power push over). Also, if the engine should stop, don't automatically push the stick fast forward.

You set the only main wheels down when landing and they must point in the direction you're flying or you'll tip over -
remember the energy in the rotor. And look up flapping or blade sailing. We have way too many star/landing accidents.

So, if you can remember that you fly the rotor and can forget some of your fixed wing programming, you'll have lots of fun.

The best way to discover what kind of gyro you want is to take some lessons in different gyros.

Myself, in 2017 I rented a gyro (with an instructor who wanted to go) for a tour with others on some island hopping in Denmark.

And a few years later I found a used gyro just like it (two place MTO Sport) at an attractive price in Sweden. It took me some
time to fix the things that needed fixing (new carbon rotor, new propeller, new radio and some small stuff) and I bought the
best helmet I could find. I started early summer last year, but had to stop for two reasons: I was running out of money because
of cost of full hull insurance (and rebuilding my house) and it would also soon be colder (open gyro). But we'll start up again
very soon, our jobs permitting. And I'll have my license this summer. When I feel comfortable flying it, I'll just have liability insurance.

So, get to know the rotor - what and why it's doing it's thing. Get an instructor who is really into gyros. Not a fixed winger
with some kind of add-on. It looks like all instructors may not be equally good.

But instructors are few and far between...same problem here. I now have to travel by ferry, bridge and then a ferry again.
Last year it was one ferry and two bridges. Quite a lot for Denmark, but your distances are much larger.

Flying gyro is a niche hobby. And you have come to the right place to ask questions.

Best wishes,
Erik
Soo you say whenn ascending ,to level off never push the stick forward , well HOW do you level off ?
 

GyroChuck

Gyro's are more fun
Joined
Oct 30, 2003
Messages
3,682
Location
Naperville, IL
Aircraft
SnoBird Tandem Gyro, Robinson R-22, Mosquito XE-285, Assorted Fixed Wing
Total Flight Time
2400
Soo you say whenn ascending ,to level off never push the stick forward , well HOW do you level off ?
Short answer. Reduce Power before stick forward.
 

BEN S

Super Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2007
Messages
2,880
Location
Guam
Aircraft
Sportcopter Vortex
Total Flight Time
300+
It is hard to describe the subtle diffrences in written words.
Yes you can level off without decreasing power safley, just do it gradually.
What you do NOT want to do is a fullnpower steep climb and then man handle the stick full forward while still climbing under full power.
Again it is akin to describing the relationship of a clutch and gas peddle to a young person who has never driven a stick shift.
It's about "flying the rotor" not memorizing what to do now...okay and now...okay next...okay...if flying by rote memory and "flying the numbers" is how you plan to fly a gyro, buy two sets of rotors before you start.
 

BEN S

Super Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2007
Messages
2,880
Location
Guam
Aircraft
Sportcopter Vortex
Total Flight Time
300+
I know a few CFI's who believe flying by the numbers is the best method to train new pilots.
Me and a whole lot of other gyro pilots do not agree.
You are NOT going to learn how to fly a gyro in 10 hours no matter what the hype says.
Is it worth it? Well I would say its a lifestyle, not a hobby.
I have lost a few good friends to this lifestyle, and even after leaving I found the siren song too strong to resist.

It's a lot like a crack addiction, as far as the excitement possible, and conversley it can kill you just as quick.

One word of caution, do not try to "cheap out", I have seen a lot of rigs where someone figured the local lawn mower furl pump was just as good as....or these bolts should do...

It's your ass in the seat.

Good luck
 

Vance

Gyroplane CFI
Staff member
Joined
Oct 30, 2003
Messages
17,485
Location
Santa Maria, California
Aircraft
Givens Predator
Total Flight Time
2400+ in rotorcraft
It is hard to describe the subtle diffrences in written words.
Yes you can level off without decreasing power safley, just do it gradually.
In the gyroplanes I have flown to level off after a climb I reduce power or increase speed.

I have used the throttle to manage altitude and the cyclic to manage air speed.

Is that what you are advocating Ben?
 

BEN S

Super Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2007
Messages
2,880
Location
Guam
Aircraft
Sportcopter Vortex
Total Flight Time
300+
I am not advocating anything.
I am just saying that a decent gyro pilot in a lightish gyro is a thing of beauty in the air.
I will leave the advocating and ambassadorship to others.
 

querist

Active Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2022
Messages
291
Location
Longview, Texas, USA
I know this may sound like a daft question, but have you ever flown in a gyro before? I will admit that I've wanted to fly a gyro for quite some time (and I have an RC one that I built), and when I finally had the opportunity to fly in one it "sealed the deal", so to speak. I'm just waiting on my medical.

Do yourself a favour and find somewhere near you where you can take a "discovery flight" so you can experience how different and fun gyros can be. Since you only list "Ohio" as your location, and Ohio is pretty large, I'll leave that to you. All I can say is that the discovery flight is well worth the money, even if just for the experience.

An open-cockpit gyro is the closest thing we have to Star Wars speeder bikes.
 
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