Information on Wilford rigid-rotor autogyro seems to have vanished

piolenc

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When I last visited - some time ago - there was a healthy thread about the Wilford autogyro with a rigid (i.e. feathering-only) rotor. I downloaded some of it, and just came back to follow up, but now there is nothing. I see that there was a plan to eliminate the forum completely in February, but it is still here. Did some of the threads get dumped?
My reason for following up on the Wilford thread is that I may have blundered on a solution to that rotor's tendency to over-rotate - it's one of Irv Culver's patents from his work with Lockheed.
 

JEFF TIPTON

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Try this link

 

piolenc

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It would be interesting to hear your solution anyway.

wolfy
I'm not sure if I'm the "your" in your post, but here goes. Irv Culver (may he rest in peace) came out with a patent early in his association with Lockheed that differs from the later Lockheed gyro-controlled rotors. It had two blades and a crossbar set at an acute angle to the leading edges of the blades, and appears to have been rigidly linked to the blades, so it would swing as they feathered. The patent number is US 3,080,001. My thought is that this, plus the incorporation of springs which were a feature of both the Wilford and the Lockheed rotor systems, would allow the blade feathering frequency to be tuned to about half the forcing function (the blade rotation). In that case, with minimum damping (which might be aerodynamic) the deflection would follow the inputs very closely, and the problem is solved. I spent a couple of evenings trying to work out how to build a cheap test rig that would still give recordable data. Do they still make timing lights?
As a general rule, I hate springs and try to do without them, but it doesn't look like this case can do without an elastic element of some type.
 

piolenc

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Not "my" approach, of course. I believe the rotor system was incorporated in the radio controlled helicopter that Culver built and flew before Lockheed started building full-size choppers. There is some footage in various documentary videos about the XH-51 and Cheyenne that can be found on Youtube. I'd be thrilled to find plans or even a still photograph of the RC helicopter at rest, to be sure.
 
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