If you could have the skills of one gyronaut?

chimptastic

Newbie
Joined
Apr 29, 2017
Messages
10
Location
Walker
I just found this:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnny_Miller_(aviator)

Really, sorry for the hijack. I had to get this into print so that my friends here could learn of this remarkable man.

Mabey next year at Mentone I will dig up all of my pictures and do a presentation on my fortunate experiences with early rotary winged pioneers.
No apology necessary at all, this is exactly the point of the thread! I'd love to see that kind of presentation!
 

gyroplanes

FAA DAR Gyropilot
Joined
Mar 18, 2004
Messages
6,095
Location
Lansing, Illinois (Chicago South Suburb)
Aircraft
(1) Air Command, (1) Barnett, (1) Air Command 2 place kit, (1) Sycamore gyro
Total Flight Time
2650
Thank you sir!

There is a thin line between storytelling and the ramblings of an old man. I am finding that my old and dear friends are now telling me that I talk too much.
Tommy
 

gyroplanes

FAA DAR Gyropilot
Joined
Mar 18, 2004
Messages
6,095
Location
Lansing, Illinois (Chicago South Suburb)
Aircraft
(1) Air Command, (1) Barnett, (1) Air Command 2 place kit, (1) Sycamore gyro
Total Flight Time
2650
I hijacked the thread without answering the question. Capt Johnny probably never flew our type of gyro and in the possible spirit of the question I would rule him out.
I would say for relaxed and highly skilled flying... Ken Wallis
Most remarkable gyro pilot... Roy Davis
Pure showmanship... Jim Vanek (followed by Dennis Fetters) Dennis wowed the crowds at Oshkosh ever time he flew. They would pack the tent after he flew his hands off takeoffs
Everyone else mentioned above have demonstrated great gyro handling. Greg Gremminger slamming that Magni around the pilons was a sight to behold. Hank Hinchman breaking the sound barrier in his H-1 racer (excuse me "breaking an overhead wire at Bensen Days"
Gary Goldsberry and Ken Brock always turned heads. In his younger days Ron Menzie did some tricks with his MAC Bensen that had me scratching my head.
Don Farrington in the Air & Space 18-1 and going way back Dave Prater and the wisp of a man that was a lumber jack from up in the Pacific Northwest showed us what too much thrust looked like. The Latter guy had a small, thin steel tube frame with a whopping powerful VW an, like old Dave he could pretty much hover on prop thrust.
Awad and Novotney left their mark on the sport. I give up, there are probably hundreds more we forgot.
Have fun and fly safe.
Tommy Milton early 20's when I joined the PRA, turned 74 yesterday..... go figure?
 
Top