Iconel and other special materials hardware

waynep

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Apr 2, 2019
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51
Location
Boone, NC
Have any of you used Inconel or other special materials hardware to upgrade the hardware strength of your systems? Particularly on rotor heads, shear and tension strengths are calculated and tested; above expected G and to higher safety margins. I'm looking to use an old style Bensen rotor head for a 650 lb MTOW build.
 

eutrophicated1

Designated Acronym-Nazi
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Jul 23, 2017
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Flint, Michigan
Hi, Wayne, I looked up Inconel doing just a basic Wikipedia search. You should probably do an extensive search on: steels and their alloys, of which Inconel makes up a family of 20 or so. The basic metalurgy was first developed in 1940 during WW II. They're generally comprised of Austentitic nickel-chromium steels. What you may prefer would be heat-treatable Martensitic alloys, like O1 tool steel. None of these is new metalurgy; and I suspect that O1 is 15 or so years newer on the market, and probably much tougher, after heat treatment than Inconel. Today's market of high-alloyed steels is too numerous to mention, as well as being very process intensive to work with.

If you feel the need to ask such questions, you should probably do 1-2 years of study of all these materials, or, better yet, just call Aircraft Spruce for their listing of appropriate fasteners.

Meanwhile, a good set of gyro plans would probably answer a multitude of questions, regarding materials, construction steps and methods. Just keep going onward.
 

bryancobb

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Cartersville, GA
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Owned Brantly B-2b/Fly Kitfox III/Mini-500b
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Inconel is a Nickel based corrosion resistant steel that is typically used in areas where high heat must be dealt with. Much more economical aerospace hardware is available with the same strength and anti-corrosion treatments. The Rocketdyne F-1 engine for the Saturn V was mostly made of Inconel. Many Boilers and Pressure Vessels are made of it.
 

waynep

Newbie
Joined
Apr 2, 2019
Messages
51
Location
Boone, NC
Hi, Wayne, I looked up Inconel doing just a basic Wikipedia search. You should probably do an extensive search on: steels and their alloys, of which Inconel makes up a family of 20 or so. The basic metalurgy was first developed in 1940 during WW II. They're generally comprised of Austentitic nickel-chromium steels. What you may prefer would be heat-treatable Martensitic alloys, like O1 tool steel. None of these is new metalurgy; and I suspect that O1 is 15 or so years newer on the market, and probably much tougher, after heat treatment than Inconel. Today's market of high-alloyed steels is too numerous to mention, as well as being very process intensive to work with.

If you feel the need to ask such questions, you should probably do 1-2 years of study of all these materials, or, better yet, just call Aircraft Spruce for their listing of appropriate fasteners.

Meanwhile, a good set of gyro plans would probably answer a multitude of questions, regarding materials, construction steps and methods. Just keep going onward.
Thanks for the backgrounder. I have looked at some fastener catalogues that include AN and some of these higher end bolts. 'Just want to see if anyone has already gone down this path.
 

Jazzenjohn

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Oct 9, 2004
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Milan Mich.
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I use some titanium fasteners on my gyro. It isn't the cheapest way to lose weight.
 
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