Gyroplane, Gyrodyne, or Helicopter

Smack

Re-member?
How is D. Degraw's "Gyrhino" classified by the FAA ?
Per the definitions:

Gyroplane - ... a rotorcraft whose rotors are not engine-driven, except for initial starting, but are made to rotate by action of the air when the rotorcraft is moving; and whose means of propulsion, consisting usually of conventional propellers, is independent of the rotor system.

Gyrodyne - a rotorcraft whose rotors are normally engine-driven for takeoff, hovering, and landing, and for forward flight through part of its speed range, and whose means of propulsion, consisting usually of conventional propellers, is independent of the rotor system.

Helicopter - a rotorcraft that, for its horizontal motion, depends principally on its engine-driven rotors.

If classified as a "gyrodyne", I think that it is still governed by the 'non-helicopter' rotorcraft rules; thus essentially a gyroplane to the FAA.
Is there any benefit to trying to get such an aircraft classified as a gyrodyne?

Brian
 
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