Glider Tow

kolibri282

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Interesting footage of a glider tow in Sweden. The aircraft seems to be accompanied by a drone, so we have a fairly close look all along the flight path.
Looking forward to the comments of the experts, anything peculiar about the rotor management at the start?
 

Resasi

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Not an expert but done enough on a Bensen without a prerotator to take a stab at commenting on the rotor management at the start, on the 180’s at the ends of the runways, and in general.

Flat calm day, see windsock at 6:10.

Lucky for the pilot. When patting up, face into wind and have the stick forward so rotor disc is flat, if there is any sort of a wind patting up with the disc at the angle of attack that they had is asking for blade sail/flap.

During their turns at the ends of the runway they may have put the stick forward for a bit but then the stick comes back and the disc is at a big angle of attack. At low rotor rpms with any sort of a wind into the disc the rotor will blade sail/flap.

Probably wouldn’t have kept the stick so far back for as much time as they did, had it forward a bit more and would have nursed the rotor rpm’s up a bit more gradually. But then I tend to be cautious.

Some rotors will flap sooner than others, the Dragon Wings especialy. Rotor Hawks were a pretty mild mannered rotor, and others all had slight differing behaviours.

First time I’ve seen that sort of drone footage, it seems an excellent way of recording the run for an instructor student critique after the lesson.

Ideally having the instructor alongside in a chase car in two way radio contact with the student is the way to go for instant advice on what the student is...or is not doing correctly. That way is better for avoiding an accident. Blade sailing can go badly wrong very quickly! In this case probably in the tow truck watching from the back.
 
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GyroCFI

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That's how I originally learned back in 1988. I drove almost 5 hours each way to get training with Willard Meyer as did many other gyro pilots. We would maybe get a total of 20 minutes of training in a day due to how long it took to get the next person to get in the saddle and take their turn. Finally I went to Farrington's and trained in an Air Command side by side trainer. and soloed in a weekend.

As to the rotor management, that's how it was done. No prerotators back in the day on the towed gliders.
 

Doug Riley

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It appears that the pilot levels the rotor disk upon landing after the first run -- which is prudent. After later runs, he doesn't. With no prerotator, you're always clinging to as much RRPM as you can, while trying not to tip over as you turn around at the end. Resasi is right that you would not dare hold back stick when turning around if it were breezy.

On the narrow runways on my part of the world. there isn't room for the gyro simply to turn around by following the tow car. You have to stop and do a three-point turn, by pushing back with one foot while holding nosewheel deflection with the other foot on the steering bar. Or, you can put both feet on the ground and just pick up the gyro's nose with one hand and swing it right around. Pad the tow boom angles to avoid blisters from these lifts!

Note how long the initial slow-taxi phase is after hand-starting the blades. The pilot seems to have a good feel for this procedure, as no flapping is apparent.
 

WaspAir

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Wow - pedestrians, low flying drone, a vehicle, wide well-marked pavement, all in the same runway environment . Not something I'm likely to see anywhere I fly!
 
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