Forced landing in my Helicycle....I am ok

Latest updates- I have learned a few things from analyzing my video ... I was busy watching the rotor rpm's and they were slowing down indicating either belt slippage, turbine bogging down, or both. Then when I abruptly released some of the collective, the turbine just sped up from no load. Hindsight. Teaches me that should I find my rotor rpm's lowering, to more gently ease off the collective. Abrupt dropping of the collective is good for engine outs, but not for pull downs.Stan

Thanks for the insight/hindsight ... now it all makes sense to me. I have learned much fron this thread. I thank you for that. I was taught never to drop collective unless the noise stops but to ease it down while gently increasing throttle (overriding the governor) until things stabilize.

However ... you did what few of us have done. A real emergency landing with accuracy and success. Bravo.
 
Tom- I can barely hear or feel that turbine running back there. My left yaw was my clue I had lost power. I do not have a throttle to override the governor, I can only close it to idle. I learned a lot from this experience, and besides the obvious of not asking the machine to deliver more than it can, should I be in that situation again, I will ease off the collective initially, but still lower it when I have lost power. A piston engine back there pounding out decibels and vibration is very easy to hear its power terminate or even slightly reduce. This turbine is unbelievably quiet and smooth like you would not believe. Its part of the formulae for causing me to get into a state of euphoria with it. I am not proud to admit that, but we all have our quirks. I believe that quirk has been driven out of me. I am looking forward to further drilling into myself practicing autos. That obsession with practicing these autos on a 'whim' saved my machine and butt. It makes my obsession have merit and I will be practicing these autos till Birdy gets the cows to come home. Stan
 
I just find this HV curve that strongly relates to my situation. I have always seen the typical graph on the left side...but just came across this little gem of a graph on the right side. It basically shows operating in the HV curve and different airspeeds and altitude. You can clearly see you dont want to be on the upper left side of the graph.


Stan
 

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Ed, aka Rotoplane made a suggestion in post #129 that stuck in my head. I have warning lights installed in my dash that are already wired hot. They are intended for future transmission and tail rotor gearbox chiplights. Ed mentioned having a light come on when my turbine was at max fuel. I have a fuel control arm that travels about 3/8 of an inch from a 45,000 rpm idle...to 61,500 flight rpm's. I can simply wire a micro switch that will be activated when the fuel control lever is to the rear, delivering all the fuel the turbine can get. The microswitch will ground out and turn my dash light on. If I see the light staying on steady, then that should be telling me to lighten up on the collective. Remember, I dont have a torque meter, and of course no manifold pressure gauge. I believe this will be a useful piece of information.




Stan
 
Great idea, we are now waiting for the pictures...
 
You did all the right things, do not scold yourself. When the going gets tough, the tough do what is necessary...
Keep reading the Bible, and specially the other bible, "How To Fly Helicopters" That book [saved] me many times...
 
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You did all the right things, do not scold yourself. When the going gets tough, the tough do what is necessary...
Keep reading the Bible, and specially the other bible, "How To Fly Helicopters" That book [saved] me many times...

Love your way with words Ed , I read the bible-bible , the helicopter-bible , and then everything Stan does, and guess what ........





I am still alive.

I almost think I have discovered eternal life or something. As long as there are helicopters there . Full of gas too.
 
Ed- Arnie- Thanks for the comments. I learned a lot from this event, and wear my stupidity with honor having saved myself and the helicopter. We all make mistakes, but some just need to be shared publically. I wouldn't trade this event for any other "material" event in my life. It showed me how important preparing for stupidity can redeem itself sometimes. I am a more improved helicopter pilot, as well as flying a more improved machine since this incident. Euphoria from flying a very smooth, quiet, and powerful helicopter was just too much for this fledgling helicopter pilot, who is characterically an envelope pusher sometimes. I have a deeper respect for this helicopter, and like how it has made me drill myself on emergency landings, and to not let euphoria take over common sense. Stan
 
Ed, aka Rotoplane made a suggestion in post #129 that stuck in my head. I have warning lights installed in my dash that are already wired hot. They are intended for future transmission and tail rotor gearbox chiplights. Ed mentioned having a light come on when my turbine was at max fuel. I have a fuel control arm that travels about 3/8 of an inch from a 45,000 rpm idle...to 61,500 flight rpm's. I can simply wire a micro switch that will be activated when the fuel control lever is to the rear, delivering all the fuel the turbine can get. The microswitch will ground out and turn my dash light on. If I see the light staying on steady, then that should be telling me to lighten up on the collective. Remember, I dont have a torque meter, and of course no manifold pressure gauge. I believe this will be a useful piece of information.




Stan
Stan, you were talking earlier about installing a normally open (power to close) master fuel solenoid (MFS). Wouldn't this also require the controller to be changed, since it wants to cut power to make the MFS shut, in the case of overspeed? In other words, wouldn't the controller be working backward from what it should be?
Rod
 
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