FATAL - flyARGO Xenon X2 ES-GXA, Aruvalla, Harju County, Estonia 15 JUN 2023

I feel landing on a road may not be the best choice for an emergency landing because of traffic, wires and signs.
I know it is pedantic but landing on a road one really has to only be concerned with traffic given landing suggests you are now on the ground... Attempting to land on a road maybe different - although one might take a view that wires can be anywhere and you can swap signs for trees, shrubs or cattle [for example]. I would agree with you that there is some element of luck for the unpracticed however lets face it glider pilots pull off off airfield landings as a matter of routine - are they lucky or good?
 
Some history...



[open, right-click, then "translate to English"]

But let's not pre-judge anything, and let the investigators do their work,
 
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I know it is pedantic but landing on a road one really has to only be concerned with traffic given landing suggests you are now on the ground... Attempting to land on a road maybe different - although one might take a view that wires can be anywhere and you can swap signs for trees, shrubs or cattle [for example]. I would agree with you that there is some element of luck for the unpracticed however lets face it glider pilots pull off off airfield landings as a matter of routine - are they lucky or good?
From Oxford Languages:

Land: Verb

Come down through the air and alight on the ground.

"My advice based on my experience is for the pilot making the decision where to land when the engine goes quiet and may or may not apply to this particular incident."
 
I have seen pics of the site sent to me Vance I cannot see anything out of place I do agree with the body of your comments regarding the choice of landing sites
It is possible to trip a gyroplane with wires without any damage to the wires.

Being surprised by wires may cause a pilot to deviate from his landing plan again without any damage to the wires.

I can envision a pilot imagining he is going to land on the road, seeing that wire that crosses the road and pulling the cyclic back making a vertical descent to the ground.

I feel developing a plan and sticking to it is an important part of a successful emergency landing.

Most gyroplanes will be damaged from a vertical descent landing from 25 feet above the ground and catching fire would be possible.
 
I would agree with you that there is some element of luck for the unpracticed however lets face it glider pilots pull off off airfield landings as a matter of routine - are they lucky or good?
I've been instructing in gliders since 1985, and my students are told never, ever, land on a road.

Trees and cows are easy to see. Wires are not, nor are those nasty little green posts that hold little signs or maybe just a reflector. It's even worse given that glider wings are much lower than gyro rotors (minimal vertical clearance) and much larger span than a gyro rotor (15 to 20 meters is normal these days). Sometimes the roadway cuts theough the terrain leaving berms on either side that are less than the wingspan apart.

We land safely off-airport routinely because (1) we train and practice for it, (2) we constantly keep a suitable site in range (not just lip service), and (3) we expect it to be necessary.
 
I've been instructing in gliders since 1985, and my students are told never, ever, land on a road.

Trees and cows are easy to see. Wires are not, nor are those nasty little green posts that hold little signs or maybe just a reflector. It's even worse given that glider wings are much lower than gyro rotors (minimal vertical clearance) and much larger span than a gyro rotor (15 to 20 meters is normal these days). Sometimes the roadway cuts theough the terrain leaving berms on either side that are less than the wingspan apart.

We land safely off-airport routinely because (1) we train and practice for it, (2) we constantly keep a suitable site in range (not just lip service), and (3) we expect it to be necessary.
AND, I would like to add that if all you do is power off landings, it's not a big deal. It's normal.
I kill the UAV engine before the final turn on over 95% of my manual landings.
I am more comfortable with the aircraft coming down sooner, but most of them have better than 20 to 1......
 
From Oxford Languages:

Land: Verb

Come down through the air and alight on the ground.
Indeed, yet "landing" is different.
I've been instructing in gliders since 1985, and my students are told never, ever, land on a road.
No doubt because you will have planned the event. Hence what I said was....
I would agree with you that there is some element of luck for the unpracticed however lets face it glider pilots pull off off airfield landings as a matter of routine - are they lucky or good?
To mean landing out is somewhat routine for glider pilots.

My view on roads comes from the accident of the low Cavalon being filmed by a passer by / friend on a road 10m away. In the absence of any choice of lumpy swamp v road personally I'd have taken the road, but when I say that it doesn't mean I haven't assessed the landing area any differently with Size, Shape, Slope, Surround, Surface... The point being if one has chosen to land there you have assessed the surroundings one imagines that the surface of a swamp will remain lumpy....
 
A glider pilot would tell you that if your only choices are a swamp or a road, YOU ARE OUT OF YOUR BLOODY MIND TO BE FLYING THERE AT THAT ALTITUDE.

A gyro pilot should also have "planned the event" or he is irresponsible. That's simple airmanship.

Glider pilots are neither "lucky" nor "good". They are prepared.
 
Xenon, Fly Argo, Argon, Arthur Trendak, Manufactura Locnitza
Was this a Xenon or one of other 5 variants? Does anyone know for sure
Incidentally who is the true owner of the Xenon series after Raphael Celier quit the industry.
 
Fly Argo supposedly also ripped off someone here in the US. They ordered directly since there was no dealer here. Got it but with a lot of things missing and had to pay a lot more than initially quoted.
Did Fly Argo take over the assets of Celier Aviation? Who is the true owner of this Xenon brand?
 
Did Fly Argo take over the assets of Celier Aviation? Who is the true owner of this Xenon brand?

No one and seems everyone. There are 4 or 5 companies making the same design in Poland. If you are Polish it seems to be the go to 2 seat gyro to make. None have proper representation in the US. When they do get some dealers that may be halfway decent they screw them by not paying up commissions or similar. The gyroplanes have technical issues in systems engineering like engine installation, wiring, fuel system and require someone quite technical to fix their screwups here in the US. Basically US customers initially were the Guinea pigs for their iterations.
 
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Sort of like the Polish Sun probe. When asked by space engineers how they planned to pull the probe off they explained " We are going at night"
 
No one and seems everyone. There are 4 or 5 companies making the same design in Poland. If you are Polish it seems to be the go to 2 seat gyro to make. None have proper representation in the US. When they do get some dealers that may be halfway decent they screw them by not paying up commissions or similar. The gyroplanes have technical issues in systems engineering like engine installation, wiring, fuel system and require someone quite technical to fix their screwups here in the US. Basically US customers initially were the Guinea pigs for their iterations.

Incidentally it also told me a lot about German certification. Meaning it’s something but it’s not much to go by. These machines had it and the issues were solidly there.
 
FINAL REPORT (internet autotranslated)

"Due to the supposed performance pressure to prepare for the demonstration flights in two days, the pilot did not correctly consider the weather conditions and did not use the desired maneuvers.to perform appropriate flight altitude or piloting techniques on a gyrocopter with the engine stopped. An error occurred rapid unloading of rotor energy and stalling of the rotor and loss of lift."
 

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FINAL REPORT (internet autotranslated)

"Due to the supposed performance pressure to prepare for the demonstration flights in two days, the pilot did not correctly consider the weather conditions and did not use the desired maneuvers.to perform appropriate flight altitude or piloting techniques on a gyrocopter with the engine stopped. An error occurred rapid unloading of rotor energy and stalling of the rotor and loss of lift."

I cannot make heads or tails out of this translation.
Did he unload the rotor when he had an engine out or did he have an engine out and just crashed and passed away.
 
I cannot make heads or tails out of this translation.
Did he unload the rotor when he had an engine out or did he have an engine out and just crashed and passed away.

If you speak Estonian you might do better, Abid.

However, my take from the autotranslation is:-

He was practising an engine-off landing back to the nearby strip. [very dicey, given the terrain and obstacles]
He had not accounted for the cluster of wires near the base turn, and was sinking fast.
At risk of striking the wires, he made a sudden sharp manoeuvre to the left,
which basically unloaded the rotors at low height.
 
resulting in complete destruction
ES-GXA_accident.jpg
 
For my understanding, how does a sudden sharp left turn unload the rotor?
 
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