FATAL - ELA Aviacion ELA-08 ZU-EHW, Overvlugte private airstrip, Limpopo, South Africa 10 NOV 2021

TyroGyro

Junior Member
Joined
Sep 30, 2016
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Location
Liverpool, UK
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MTOsport G-IROD
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"The instructor reported that he was standing on the ground approximately 80 metres(m) from the gyrocopter with a hand-held radio and a fire extinguisher, observing/monitoring the student pilot. The instructor reported that the student pilot completed the first circuit with no anomalies; however, during base leg for second landing, he saw the student pilot looking back at the fuel tank (behind him). According to the instructor, during that movement, the helmet got twisted around, covering the pilot’s face and obstructing his view. While trying to put the helmet back on, it appeared as if the student pilot accidentally pushed the left rudder which caused the gyrocopter to yaw to the left. Thereafter, the gyrocopter’s fuselage tilted to the right; however, the power was not reduced, and the main rotor blades were unloaded. The gyrocopter rolled over to the right-side and impacted the ground in that position, approximately 20 metres from the runway threshold. The instructor ran to the site where the student pilot had crash-landed and found him under the gyrocopter."


Maybe the location spelling is "Overvlakte".
 
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"The instructor reported that he was standing on the ground approximately 80 metres(m) from the gyrocopter with a hand-held radio and a fire extinguisher, observing/monitoring the student pilot. The instructor reported that the student pilot completed the first circuit with no anomalies; however, during base leg for second landing, he saw the student pilot looking back at the fuel tank (behind him). According to the instructor, during that movement, the helmet got twisted around, covering the pilot’s face and obstructing his view. While trying to put the helmet back on, it appeared as if the student pilot accidentally pushed the left rudder which caused the gyrocopter to yaw to the left. Thereafter, the gyrocopter’s fuselage tilted to the right; however, the power was not reduced, and the main rotor blades were unloaded. The gyrocopter rolled over to the right-side and impacted the ground in that position, approximately 20 metres from the runway threshold. The instructor ran to the site where the student pilot had crash-landed and found him under the gyrocopter."


Maybe the location spelling is "Overvlakte".
Perhaps I am just having a problem with the translation as I try to visualize what is being described.

I have flown with an lot of different helmets behind a lot of different windshields and I have never had the helmet shift around and obstruct my view.

I don’t know how a left yaw with the fuselage tilted to the right without reducing power would cause the rotor to be unloaded.

A mention of airspeed would be helpful.
 
Perhaps I am just having a problem with the translation as I try to visualize what is being described.

I have flown with an lot of different helmets behind a lot of different windshields and I have never had the helmet shift around and obstruct my view.

I don’t know how a left yaw with the fuselage tilted to the right without reducing power would cause the rotor to be unloaded.

A mention of airspeed would be helpful.
Vance our SA CAA are notorious for bad aircraft accident investigation reports it’s hot topic on one of our local forums
 
This accident has only recently been added to the ASN database. I can find no media reports.

All we have is the quoted text from the South African CAA preliminary report. (from the pdf).

Hopefully this will be amplified in due course with a final report.

The final reports SA CAA have done so far on gyrocopter fatals seem quite thorough, imho.


The same machine was apparently involved in a serious accident many years ago,

 
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Perhaps I am just having a problem with the translation as I try to visualize what is being described.

I have flown with an lot of different helmets behind a lot of different windshields and I have never had the helmet shift around and obstruct my view.

I don’t know how a left yaw with the fuselage tilted to the right without reducing power would cause the rotor to be unloaded.

A mention of airspeed would be helpful.
I'm with you, Vance. I've worn helmets since the 1960s on motorcycles, in rotorcraft, while mountain climbing, sabre fencing (they call it a "mask" there), skydiving, in batting practice, plus hardhats in construction, etc., and in all sorts of conditions, and can't imagine any of those helmets spinning around to block a view at any subsonic speed. You can spin a ball cap around to fit backwards with the brim over your neck (quite the fashion for a while), but they're symmetrical and soft, and even that is easier if you lift it off first. Helmets are not built that way.
 
I'm with you, Vance. I've worn helmets since the 1960s on motorcycles, in rotorcraft, while mountain climbing, sabre fencing (they call it a "mask" there), skydiving, in batting practice, plus hardhats in construction, etc., and in all sorts of conditions, and can't imagine any of those helmets spinning around to block a view at any subsonic speed. You can spin a ball cap around to fit backwards with the brim over your neck (quite the fashion for a while), but they're symmetrical and soft, and even that is easier if you lift it off first. Helmets are not built that way.
What if the helmet was way too large?
There is an assumption the helmet actually fit, but that is unknown.
Also, the wire from a mic boom could be too short, or wrapped on something, so the action of looking back would
have held the helmet in place.
This wouldn't happen with a full face helmet, but an open face with a boom mic that was a few sizes too large,
and, or not strapped on could rotate enough to cause panic when too many other things are going on....
A lot of speculation, but I have seen things go south from a minor issue that cascades into a major one....
 
If the fit is so bad that it can spin around on your head, not even stopped by your nose, the instructor should never have permitted solo flight with that gear. That's like sending you up when you can't reach the pedals.
 
If the fit is so bad that it can spin around on your head, not even stopped by your nose, the instructor should never have permitted solo flight with that gear. That's like sending you up when you can't reach the pedals.
The same instructor was the guy training the guy who died in Kenya a while back …he was also involved in the deaths of the young men who died after gaining a recreational licence and went crop spraying…maybe he did not concern himself with how the helmet fitted?
not saying anything bad about the instructor ( cos SA gyro is a political shit storm you guys have no idea) I’m simply adding fact
 
If the fit is so bad that it can spin around on your head, not even stopped by your nose, the instructor should never have permitted solo flight with that gear. That's like sending you up when you can't reach the pedals.
Maybe they taped blocks on the pedals !!!
 
Many of these accidents are so ridiculous that I can't even comment on them.
Sometimes people just need to get their head out of their behind and use some coffee beans that God gives us.
What in the world is going on if this is truly what happened here even if partially this is what happened. It is pure lunacy. How is this instructor still have his instructor cert.
 
The same instructor was the guy training the guy who died in Kenya a while back …he was also involved in the deaths of the young men who died after gaining a recreational licence and went crop spraying…maybe he did not concern himself with how the helmet fitted?
not saying anything bad about the instructor ( cos SA gyro is a political shit storm you guys have no idea) I’m simply adding fact
Probably the saddest, unnecessary, accidents so far in the database...:cry:

 
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It is my observation that my learners can come up with some very creative ways to wreck a gyroplane.

It is my observation that witnesses to an gyroplane mishap may come up with some very creative ways to describe the sequence of events.

It is my observation that people can find some implausible things to attribute the mishap to.

Many of the gyroplane mishaps I have studied appear to me to have a misunderstanding of what the controls do as a part of the accident chain.

Early on I teach the value of coordinated flight and yet when things begin to go wrong the lessons are often overridden by fear.
 
Probably the saddest accidents so far in the database...:cry:

The instructor is currently in court for manslaughter, claims he did nothing wrong ? Above that he says his conscience is clear….I have it from an ex SA CAA inspector that after the case they parents of the deceased will be making application for a private prosecution …he was happy to send a kid (comm rated on FW or Heli) to do crop spraying with a gyro …if we break it down this means the kids had 10 hours duel, 10 hours solo and them getting their gyro licence …to train them for the ag work they were going to do? he should have stuck by the rules of part 96 …then his conscience could be clear ..
I assisted in the making of that video with the brother of one of the deceased ….sad to the core, Judy Miles who also lost her son in this debacle has not recovered and is in fact I’ll due to the loss
 
It is my observation that my learners can come up with some very creative ways to wreck a gyroplane.

It is my observation that witnesses to an gyroplane mishap may come up with some very creative ways to describe the sequence of events.

It is my observation that people can find some implausible things to attribute the mishap to.

Many of the gyroplane mishaps I have studied appear to me to have a misunderstanding of what the controls do as a part of the accident chain.

Early on I teach the value of coordinated flight and yet when things begin to go wrong the lessons are often overridden by fear.

So you think that this accident and the 4 accidents listed for 4 young airplane pilots in gyroplanes in SA are because the instructor and the school were not an idiot?
I am sorry Vance "if" that is what you are telling then me and you are miles and miles apart.
Gyroplane instruction is so low quality both in the US and abroad that it is painfully obvious where the problem lies to me.
An airplane pilot even with a commercial cert and being young is all good. But 20 hours of instruction is just barely enough to allow them to fly recreationally with a level of safety. There is no way in hell that I would have recommended a young commercial airplane or heli pilot in 20 hours to go fly a gyroplane commercially for agricultural work. How about 250 hours and then work specific training. That is more like it.
I have never done ag work in anything. I am coming to 650 hours in gyroplanes and am an instructor. I would never assume to just start ag work. I would go fly with someone who has done it and take 15 to 20 hours of practice with them before ever attempting it.

At 20 hours, I barely knew how to land a gyroplane properly in a crosswind and not to brag but I usually catch on on what to do faster than most and can figure out where my and plane's limits are faster than even more to keep myself in check.
 
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A gyro crash in Dubai a few years ago was at least partly caused by a helmet issue, and certainly over the years a helmet or two has gone through a prop. I had my full face visor flip up on me when I looked over my shoulder, and the drag was considerable and somewhat disorientating, but fortunately not at a critical phase of the flight.
 
A gyro crash in Dubai a few years ago was at least partly caused by a helmet issue, and certainly over the years a helmet or two has gone through a prop. I had my full face visor flip up on me when I looked over my shoulder, and the drag was considerable and somewhat disorientating, but fortunately not at a critical phase of the flight.
Someone I met lost a helmet on his very first flight in his new gyro machine, going through the prop.

He made a successful emergency landing in a field. But he was a very experienced pilot (helis). And, of course, lucky...
 

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certainly over the years a helmet or two has gone through a prop.
I don't doubt that for a moment, but this is the first incident I've ever heard explained by the helmet twisting around to block the pilot's vision.
 
Someone I met lost a helmet on his very first flight in his new gyro machine, going through the prop.

He made a successful emergency landing in a field. But he was a very experienced pilot (helis). And lucky...
Losing a helmet meant he had a blond moment where he did not secure the helmet on his head. Aviation does not afford us too many blond moments. Your friend was lucky. Maybe they should make helmets with straps with dummy lights.

Also, it is conceivable that a helmet could be lost because the buckle literally unlatched because it was rusted, old and malfunctioned. In which case it would be up to the operator to keep equipment tested and in shape.
However, this is something completely different. The helmets twisted around his face. That would be so out of shape and size to be able to do anything barely fitting the description that sending a student up with such a bad fit is just very bad and is hard to believe to me.
Similarly, the video in SA 4 fatal accidents posted in the thread of 4 young pilots coming from airplanes having fatal accidents because they had sum total of 20 hours in gyroplanes, and they are doing commercial ag work regardless of their hours and certs in airplanes is just asinine. What does having a commercial cert in airplane do for you in flying ag missions in gyroplanes. Nothing. What counts is time in type. If anything, airplane habits may create more danger at first.

Is the instructor for the accident listed in the title of this thread related to or the same as the one for the 4 fatal accidents in young commercial airplane pilots in SA? That isn't clear to me.
 
So you think that this accident and the 4 accidents listed for 4 young airplane pilots in gyroplanes in SA are because the instructor and the school were not an idiot?
I am sorry Vance "if" that is what you are telling then me and you are miles and miles apart.
Gyroplane instruction is so low quality both in the US and abroad that it is painfully obvious where the problem lies to me.
An airplane pilot even with a commercial cert and being young is all good. But 20 hours of instruction is just barely enough to allow them to fly recreationally with a level of safety. There is no way in hell that I would have recommended a young commercial airplane or heli pilot in 20 hours to go fly a gyroplane commercially for agricultural work. How about 250 hours and then work specific training. That is more like it.
I have never done ag work in anything. I am coming to 650 hours in gyroplanes and am an instructor. I would never assume to just start ag work. I would go fly with someone who has done it and take 15 to 20 hours of practice with them before ever attempting it.

At 20 hours, I barely knew how to land a gyroplane properly in a crosswind and not to brag but I usually catch on on what to do faster than most and can figure out where my and plane's limits are faster than even more to keep myself in check.
Why do you feel the need to denigrate gyroplane flight instructors Abid?

I feel it was clear I was writing about the accident that started this thread.

We can’t ask the accident pilot the sequence of events that led to his demise.

I know very little about the flight instructor who soloed the accident pilot so I have no idea if he is an idiot.

It appears to me from the description of the accident he may have made some mistakes.

I don’t know anyone who never makes mistakes.

I don’t know enough about the spraying accidents to have an opinion.

I have not done agricultural spraying in a gyroplane so I have no idea how long it would take to train someone to proficiency.

I suspect the time required would have a lot to do with the particular procedure for the spraying and the gyroplane being flown.

In my opinion gyroplanes are not that difficult to fly.

Maneuvering at low speeds near the ground elevates the risk.

I have flown with some gyroplane flight instructors in the USA that in my opinion do a great job of teaching people to fly gyroplanes.
 
Losing a helmet meant he had a blond moment where he did not secure the helmet on his head. Aviation does not afford us too many blond moments.
As far as I could gather, he was reaching to retrieve a Mars bar [of all things] from the pocket of his MTO Sport, when the helmet momentarily went into the slipstream. And off it went...
Mars_Bar.jpg
 
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