FAA Rotorcraft Gyroplane vs Helicopter Regulations

Tyger

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I had always preferred the term gyroplane until now. After reading the previous comments above I have come to realize this term is actually detrimental to our cause with the FAA and their mindset regarding our unique aircraft.
As you may know, the two parts of "helicopter" are from greek: "helico" (helix/spiral) and "pter" (wing). "Gyro" comes from the greek word for circle. "Co" does not belong with it; "Gyrocopter" is a total bastardization and immediately makes ordinary folk think "special helicopter".
If you no longer like the official FAA term, "gyroplane" (because it contains "plane"?), and want something unique, as you say, I suggest "gyropter" (circle-wing). It's a word apart, but with impeccable etymology. :)
 

MilesW

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As you may know, the two parts of "helicopter" are from greek: "helico" (helix/spiral) and "pter" (wing). "Gyro" comes from the greek word for circle. "Co" does not belong with it; "Gyrocopter" is a total bastardization and immediately makes ordinary folk think "special helicopter".
If you no longer like the official FAA term, "gyroplane" (because it contains "plane"?), and want something unique, as you say, I suggest "gyropter" (circle-wing). It's a word apart, but with impeccable etymology. :)
I think you will find that the Greek is actually "helix" and "pteron".

"Gyrocopter" is a perfectly logical adaptation from 'helicopter" which is from the French "helicoptere" which is certainly no bastardization. The "co" is entirely their doing though.

What is wrong with the image of a "special helicopter" anyway? How about "gyrochopper" for a modern feel?
 

Philbennett

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I have demonstrated at Wrens that I can safely and routinely do a 180 at 20 ft AGL within a ~20 ft radius, losing only about 3 ft of altitude with my 600lb tandem Air Command, Skywheels rotorblades, and 145 HP Yamaha YG4. Walk in the park.
I'd like to see that.
 

Tyger

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I think you will find that the Greek is actually "helix" and "pteron".
You are only considering the nominative forms of those nouns and ignoring the way combination nouns are typically formed (I did actually study ancient greek once upon a time). The "co" is not a french invention; it is from the genitive (possessive) form, ἕλικος

Anyway, if you read what I said, carefully, I did not say that "helico" and "pter" were proper greek words themselves; I said that those two parts of the word "helicopter" came from the greek words meaning spiral and wing.

Since the french word predates the invention of the machine by many decades, one might assume the "spiral" idea came from ideas such as da Vinci's, whose drawing depicted an actual spiral form.

I think it's accurate to say that a gyroplane is NOT a special form of helicopter, at all!
 
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