Depth Perception in Gyros

smoline

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Feb 24, 2023
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I “seem” to have a depth perception challenge while flying fixed wing aircraft. It’s difficult to discern my altitude during a landing approach.

In flying a gyroplane, does depth perception play a larger role, or a lesser one? I am “assuming” it’s less because of the relatively lower speed of a gyro at landing and the easier ability to quickly make altitude adjustments.

Please advise.
 
You are correct - Most gyros landing speed is very slow to almost zero. Gyros also have a much better view all around and sight picture than any fixed wing. I tell my students not to get too hung up on perfect approaches until you are about 50 ft from the runway.

FYI - I am blind in one eye and have no problem greasing landings in my Magni's.
 
I “seem” to have a depth perception challenge while flying fixed wing aircraft. It’s difficult to discern my altitude during a landing approach.

In flying a gyroplane, does depth perception play a larger role, or a lesser one? I am “assuming” it’s less because of the relatively lower speed of a gyro at landing and the easier ability to quickly make altitude adjustments.

Please advise.
Visit an Optometrist or Ophthalmologist to have a professional evaluation of your own personal level of depth perception.

FYI - I am blind in one eye and have no problem greasing landings in my Magni's.
There are many pilots that fly with monocular vision (one eye). Gyroplane CFI Vance Breeze is one.

Wayne
 
I am also blind in one eye and am a gyroplane flight instructor.

I teach to look at the aiming point until I am about 15 feet above the ground and began the round out intentionally shifting my focus to the horizon.

It appears to me that the runway will come up to greet me and as long as I don’t run out of airspeed before running out of altitude everything will be fine.

If I balloon up because I pull the cyclic back too fast I reduce my back pressure on the cyclic and try again being ready for a more aggressive flare near the ground.

If I balloon up twice I go around.

I give a little tug on the cyclic when I am almost on the ground for the final flare.

I began with power on landings so things happen more slowly and then transition to power off landings.

The goal is a smooth touch down at very low ground speed.

It is my observation that people who look down at the runway instead at the horizon have more of a challenge learning.

Because of power-pitch-yaw coupling on most gyroplanes I teach to leave the power setting alone from about fifty feet above the ground to touch down and then remove the power holding the cyclic well back so that I am nearly stopped when the nose tire touches the runway.

This is not intended to be flight instruction.
 
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