Crawl to run 10 Exercise plan. Found IT! (edit...gyro flown!)

samouced

Active Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2022
Messages
110
Location
Ormond Beach, FL
Aircraft
KB-2/3
Total Flight Time
1300
The following operational training sequence is based on many years of experience that will provide you‑with a safe continued training program.

ALL PRACTICE MUST BE CONDUCTED IN NO WIND - CALM AIR CONDITIONS FOLLOWING A PROPER & THOROUGH PRE-FLIGHT OF YOUR GYRO II!

EXERCISE 1 -Begin by starting & running the engine. If you have to hand prop for starting, be sure you have the gyro secured. Don't hand start the first few times without qualified assistance.

CONDITONS- No wind - calm air.
EXERCISE 2
- Practice pre-spinning the rotorblades.

EXERCISE 3 - Spend a few hours taxiing your gyroplane with rotorblades spinning, get used to the steering, braking, & other differences.

CONDITIONS - No wind - calm air.
EXERCISE 4 -
You are now ready to get the feel of what take-off attitude is like in a few runs down the runway just raising & lowering the nose wheel, main wheels kept on the runway. This exercise will show you how much stick movement is needed for proper take off attitude.

CONDITIONS - No wind - calm air.
Only after you are fully comfortable practicing exercise 4 and you can keep a straight line taxiing, placing the nose wheel in the take off attitude the full length of the runway several times should you continue to exercise 5.

CONDITIONS - No wind - calm air.

EXERCISE 5
- Now you should be ready to make some very short, low level hops. It's very important to reduce the throttle as you take-off & immediately land. Continue these short hops, extending the length of each flight keeping within a few feet above the runway. Practice this for a few hours until you feel comfortable.

CONDITIONS - No wind - calm air.

6
- Now you can continue flights over the runway at different heights. Maintain your airspeed and stay over the runway. Don't get so high up that you will not have enough runway to land.

CONDITIONS - No wind - calm air.
EXERCISE 7
- Once you can comfortably fly the length of the runway at various heights, begin to make shallow "S" turns. The proper procedure is as follows:

Take off.

Climb to approx 100 feet.

Reduce throttle before leveling off.

Maintain 45 mph airspeed.

Proceed to make a shallow turn to the right & return to the center line of the runway to land. Practice all the same procedures you were taught in the two-place. Continue shallow "S" turns one direction at a time. Remember, maintain your airspeed, and proper flight attitude while making shallow turns.

CONDITIONS - 5 MPH MAXIMUM WIND STRAIGHT DOWN THE RUNWAY.
EXERCISE
8 - You must be capable of safely landing your gyroplane in the event of an engine failure. The length of your runway-will determine the maximum altitude you can climb to and land before getting to the end of the runway. You should allow room at the end of the runway in the event you overshoot your landing spot. And you must stay over the runway.

Climb to your predetermined altitude and slowly reduce the throttle a little more each time for each landing. Continue this until you can reduce the throttle to idle. Remember, lower the nose and maintain your airspeed.

CONDTIONS - No wind - calm air.
EXERCISE 9
- Now that you have accumulated several hours of the previous maneuvers, it's time to determine if you are ready to make your first flight around the Airport Traffic Pattern. When you can fly the length of the runway at various speeds holding 2 to 3 feet altitude and do this without any up and down movements consistently several times, YOU HAVE PASSED THE TEST.

CONDITIONS - No wind - calm air.
EXERCISE 10
- Your first flight around the Airport Traffic Pattern. Choose an early morning or late afternoon, when there is little or no airplane traffic,

Remember, perform a thorough pre-flight. After take-off, climb to 500 feet and continue to fly the pattern staying close to the runway, while watching for other traffic. After landing and securing your gyro you may now congratulate yourself on your first solo around the pattern in your gyro.
 
Last edited:
Good stuff,
will incorporate that into "Irene the Gyro's" Phase 1 program this spring.
Cheers,
Jeff
 
Hot damn! It flies! With me on it too....
Conducted exercise 5 this weekend. I flew it at the local airport. I need many more short flights as being a helicopter guy, am not use to 35 knots before liftoff. Rotor tach works great and I'm off the ground at 300 rpm. Have not used full throttle yet either.
 

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  • Crawl to run 10 Exercise plan. Found IT! (edit...gyro flown!)
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Hot damn! It flies! With me on it too....
Conducted exercise 5 this weekend. I flew it at the local airport. I need many more short flights as being a helicopter guy, am not use to 35 knots before liftoff. Rotor tach works great and I'm off the ground at 300 rpm. Have not used full throttle yet either.
Congratulations Duke!

At the risk of offering unsolicited advice; I feel it is important to let the gyroplane lift off by itself without pilot input.

If you stay balanced on the mains; when you reach some combination of indicated airspeed and rotor rpm she will waddle into the air on her own.

Rotating at some specific rotor rpm or indicated airspeed is a bad habit to get into that will likely eventually bite you.
 
The following operational training sequence is based on many years of experience that will provide you‑with a safe continued training program.

ALL PRACTICE MUST BE CONDUCTED IN NO WIND - CALM AIR CONDITIONS FOLLOWING A PROPER & THOROUGH PRE-FLIGHT OF YOUR GYRO II!

EXERCISE 1 -Begin by starting & running the engine. If you have to hand prop for starting, be sure you have the gyro secured. Don't hand start the first few times without qualified assistance.

CONDITONS- No wind - calm air.
EXERCISE 2
- Practice pre-spinning the rotorblades.

EXERCISE 3 - Spend a few hours taxiing your gyroplane with rotorblades spinning, get used to the steering, braking, & other differences.

CONDITIONS - No wind - calm air.
EXERCISE 4 -
You are now ready to get the feel of what take-off attitude is like in a few runs down the runway just raising & lowering the nose wheel, main wheels kept on the runway. This exercise will show you how much stick movement is needed for proper take off attitude.

CONDITIONS - No wind - calm air.
Only after you are fully comfortable practicing exercise 4 and you can keep a straight line taxiing, placing the nose wheel in the take off attitude the full length of the runway several times should you continue to exercise 5.

CONDITIONS - No wind - calm air.

EXERCISE 5
- Now you should be ready to make some very short, low level hops. It's very important to reduce the throttle as you take-off & immediately land. Continue these short hops, extending the length of each flight keeping within a few feet above the runway. Practice this for a few hours until you feel comfortable.

CONDITIONS - No wind - calm air.

6
- Now you can continue flights over the runway at different heights. Maintain your airspeed and stay over the runway. Don't get so high up that you will not have enough runway to land.

CONDITIONS - No wind - calm air.
EXERCISE 7
- Once you can comfortably fly the length of the runway at various heights, begin to make shallow "S" turns. The proper procedure is as follows:

Take off.

Climb to approx 100 feet.

Reduce throttle before leveling off.

Maintain 45 mph airspeed.

Proceed to make a shallow turn to the right & return to the center line of the runway to land. Practice all the same procedures you were taught in the two-place. Continue shallow "S" turns one direction at a time. Remember, maintain your airspeed, and proper flight attitude while making shallow turns.

CONDITIONS - 5 MPH MAXIMUM WIND STRAIGHT DOWN THE RUNWAY.
EXERCISE
8 - You must be capable of safely landing your gyroplane in the event of an engine failure. The length of your runway-will determine the maximum altitude you can climb to and land before getting to the end of the runway. You should allow room at the end of the runway in the event you overshoot your landing spot. And you must stay over the runway.

Climb to your predetermined altitude and slowly reduce the throttle a little more each time for each landing. Continue this until you can reduce the throttle to idle. Remember, lower the nose and maintain your airspeed.

CONDTIONS - No wind - calm air.
EXERCISE 9
- Now that you have accumulated several hours of the previous maneuvers, it's time to determine if you are ready to make your first flight around the Airport Traffic Pattern. When you can fly the length of the runway at various speeds holding 2 to 3 feet altitude and do this without any up and down movements consistently several times, YOU HAVE PASSED THE TEST.

CONDITIONS - No wind - calm air.
EXERCISE 10
- Your first flight around the Airport Traffic Pattern. Choose an early morning or late afternoon, when there is little or no airplane traffic,

Remember, perform a thorough pre-flight. After take-off, climb to 500 feet and continue to fly the pattern staying close to the runway, while watching for other traffic. After landing and securing your gyro you may now congratulate yourself on your first solo around the pattern in your gyro.
Is this an abbreviated Bensen Syllabus? At one time, Dr. Bensen had said that one needs to practice each step at a minimum of seven times to start developing the "muscle memory" required to perform a maneuver consistently and safely.

If one has ever played sports as a child. In the beginning, the learning phase certainly did take a minimum of seven times to learn how to perform a certain action consistently. Repetition of a good habit then solidifies the "muscle memory" within one's brain that develops the correct, unconscious, automatic, response of an action.

Wayne
 
Congratulations Duke!

At the risk of offering unsolicited advice; I feel it is important to let the gyroplane lift off by itself without pilot input.

If you stay balanced on the mains; when you reach some combination of indicated airspeed and rotor rpm she will waddle into the air on her own.

Rotating at some specific rotor rpm or indicated airspeed is a bad habit to get into that will likely eventually bite you.
Thank you sir, I have the cyclic full back till she waddles. Once in the air, will start hitting full throttle. I plan on staying over the runway for many more takeoff and landings.
 
Thank you sir, I have the cyclic full back till she waddles. Once in the air, will start hitting full throttle. I plan on staying over the runway for many more takeoff and landings.
Not balancing on the mains (slowly bringing the cyclic forward as airspeed and rotor rpm increase) will allow the gyroplane to lift off too early leaving you at a speed well below VX.

This is likely why they tell you to reduce throttle and land immediately and the importance of no wind.

Balancing on the mains is how the gyroplane tells you she may be ready to fly.

When the nose comes up bring the cyclic continually forward as air speed and rotor rpm build keeping the nose tire a few inches off the ground.

If you set the nose wheel back down you have come too far forward too soon for the airspeed and rotor rpm.

Balancing on the mains is an important skill to learn to get a feel for the aircraft control.

“EXERCISE 5 - Now you should be ready to make some very short, low level hops. It's very important to reduce the throttle as you take-off & immediately land. Continue these short hops, extending the length of each flight keeping within a few feet above the runway. Practice this for a few hours until you feel comfortable.”

What is happening is as rotor thrust increases with rotor rpm the rotor thrust vector (90 degrees from the center of the rotor) is aimed at the front wheel and the front wheel will lift first.

As you move the cyclic forward you are moving the rotor thrust vector aft toward the center of gravity where she will fly.
 
Not balancing on the mains (slowly bringing the cyclic forward as airspeed and rotor rpm increase) will allow the gyroplane to lift off too early leaving you at a speed well below VX.

This is likely why they tell you to reduce throttle and land immediately and the importance of no wind.

Balancing on the mains is how the gyroplane tells you she may be ready to fly.

When the nose comes up bring the cyclic continually forward as air speed and rotor rpm build keeping the nose tire a few inches off the ground.

If you set the nose wheel back down you have come too far forward too soon for the airspeed and rotor rpm.

Balancing on the mains is an important skill to learn to get a feel for the aircraft control.

“EXERCISE 5 - Now you should be ready to make some very short, low level hops. It's very important to reduce the throttle as you take-off & immediately land. Continue these short hops, extending the length of each flight keeping within a few feet above the runway. Practice this for a few hours until you feel comfortable.”

What is happening is as rotor thrust increases with rotor rpm the rotor thrust vector (90 degrees from the center of the rotor) is aimed at the front wheel and the front wheel will lift first.

As you move the cyclic forward you are moving the rotor thrust vector aft toward the center of gravity where she will fly.
Got it! Thank you again.
 
Congratulations Duke!

At the risk of offering unsolicited advice; I feel it is important to let the gyroplane lift off by itself without pilot input.

If you stay balanced on the mains; when you reach some combination of indicated airspeed and rotor rpm she will waddle into the air on her own.

Rotating at some specific rotor rpm or indicated airspeed is a bad habit to get into that will likely eventually bite you.
Everything you say here is true Vance.

However, some generalizations can be made. In a Bensen B8M or Brock KB2 or KB3, with 22 or 23 foot rotors and a 160 to170 pound pilot, it usually rocks back at somewhere around 20 or 25 MPH. If you ease the stick forward enough to balance the aircraft on the mains it will generally fly off at about 35 MPH and climb, cruise, descend at about 45 MPH. The light single seat gyros (like those mentioned above) do not waddle into the air like their heavier brethren but lift off in an almost level pitch attitude.

Congratulations Duke!

Take my paragraph above with a grain of salt as my Bensen/Brock days are long ago. Dave Bacon is a treasure trove of info on the flight characteristics of these aircraft.

Jim
 
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