Best "First" Gyro?

wfcentral

Newbie
Joined
Apr 19, 2016
Messages
19
Location
Wichita Falls, Tx
It appears the closest PRA Chapter is in Anahauc Texas, about 400 miles for you. They are a very active Chapter; and an Instructor is available in the area. The National PRA fly-in in Mentone Indiana is July 19-23 2016. You can check it out at "www.PRA.org".
I will be there, and if (1) you don't weigh more than 200ish (2) I will give you a ride in the rear seat of the Dominator! Catching a ride can be a long waiting challenge at the fly-ins. Or if you come through middle Tennessee, I will give you a ride at my home base. Dickson, Tn (M02) mike-zero-two. I am 40 miles west of Nashville. You have a standing offer.
The same goes for your wife!
Thanks for the offer! But - like I said in my initial post I'm in the daydreaming / planning phase right now. Also, I weigh 225 and push 230 some times though I really want to get that back down to 190.

1. pay for daughter's October wedding
2. replace wife's car (200k miles on it right now)
3. get a motorhome for traveling to see the kids
4. pay off the house
5. get a gyroplane

I don't know if I'll even make it to number 4 at this point :eek:hwell:
 

Gyro28866

David McCutchen
Joined
May 8, 2009
Messages
1,892
Location
Dickson, Tn. USA
Aircraft
Benson B7m & B8m, Dominator II; Kolb Mark III Classic
Total Flight Time
750 combined FW & Gyro
I have hauled 265# known and a 280ish suspected, but I am pretty much a full throttle for the entire flight.
you always have a standing offer, though.
 

Learjet

Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2007
Messages
343
Location
Cape Town, South Africa
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Magni M16 Magni M22
wfcentral,

There has been some excellent advice posted here already and I echo the sentiments of those who advise you to fly the different models available to you before making a final decision.

What I will add as a different perspective, is that to my mind I believe gyro aviation in the USA is now undergoing an evolution, similar to that which occurred in South Africa and Europe / U.K. over the past decade or two. Basically, this was brought about by the growing popularity of factory built gyros entering the market. The upshot of this has had both positive and negative consequences. The positives have been the significant increase in the popularity and the number of gyros, and that they have in a sense finally (once again) taken their rightful place in the general & recreational aviation sector. The so-called "new-generation" gyros have also done much to rectify the old, but lingering, misperceptions of gyros being unsafe death-traps.

On the down-side, the rapid growth of gyros has also put them "on the radar" so to speak and with that has come increased attention and regulation from civil aviation authorities to "bring them in line" with other aircraft. The surging popularity of factory built gyros has also very unfortunately all but killed off the home-build sector here - pushing "traditional" Bensen & KB genre gyros almost into total obscurity. The nail in their coffin has also been the increasingly regulatory environment making it difficult, if not impossible, for the older home-build gyro types to conform to BCAR Section-T and other "acceptance standards" required for airworthy certification. This will sound Draconian to many in the USA who cherish the "freedom of flight" but trust me, this is what lies ahead at some point in time. The same has happened to us in South Africa, England and elsewhere... Be this increased regulation based on terrorism or security fears, beauracracy, officialdom or simply politician rule-making-mentality, whatever the reason, the future is increasingly that of nanny-state regulation of one sort or another.
The other downside is that the demise of home build gyros together with the frighteningly expensive price tag of factory build models (and kits) have made gyro aviation less and less accessible to all but those who can afford it.

I mention this all because whatever you decide to purchase now may be impacted upon what happens in the future - and may specifically impact significantly on the resale-ability and value of your gyro down the line. I can tell you that in South Africa, where many Bensen-derivative home built gyros once graced our skies - I haven't seen a single one flying here in the last ten years. (out of approx. 400 gyros registered in South Africa) :-( I do acknowledge that the USA may be altogether different - but I suspect that inevitably it will eventually follow the same path as other countries where gyros have become popular.

Lastly, welcome to the wonderful world of gyros. I wish you many happy and safe hours of flying in whatever gyro your preference leads you to.
 
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Joined
Jun 28, 2013
Messages
269
Location
San Diego
At least as far as the US goes, I do not share that sentiment. If the FAA ever accepts gyros enough to allow them to be sold factory-built as S-LSA then that would only be a good thing and would not preclude them from still being sold as experimental amateur-built. There are plenty of E-AB airplanes.
 

fara

AR-1 gyro manufacturer
Joined
Oct 31, 2011
Messages
3,299
Location
Tampa, FL
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AR-1
Total Flight Time
3600+ .. New to gyroplanes
I really want to see the 6 seat gyro flying. --Something better than a test flight where it actually breaks ground effect.
And you want that done in just the Euro 200,000 grant EU gave them to do this 6 seater. I think that test should cost extra :). Just kidding.
 

PW_Plack

Active Member
Joined
Oct 30, 2003
Messages
8,538
Location
West Valley City, Utah, USA
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Sport Copter Vortex 582
Total Flight Time
FW: 200 Gyro: 51
...pushing "traditional" Bensen & KB genre gyros almost into total obscurity. The nail in their coffin has also been the increasingly regulatory environment making it difficult, if not impossible, for the older home-build gyro types to conform to BCAR Section-T and other "acceptance standards" required for airworthy certification.
Dave, I don't know about elsewhere, but just about everything here is grandfathered based on the regulations at the time of registration. Once an experimental airworthiness certificate is issued here in the US, it's basically good forever. If you find a 1970 Bensen B8M in a barn, and it hasn't flown in 40 years, it can be re-registered if the paperwork is in order. If it was never registered and meets our ultralight limits (including 115 kg max empty weight), it can still be flown under our Part 103 regs with no airworthiness or certification requirements.

It has been odd to see the progression in the UK, where some machines were restricted based on poor stability, but prohibited from adding horizontal stabilizers because they weren't in the original spec. Thankfully some of that seems to have eased.

All it would take to get single-seat gyros past Section T would be someone with money making a bet he could sell enough of them to pay the costs of proving compliance. The fact that nobody in the UK has seen a market for such a path tells me it's more likely a collapse in the appeal of single-seat, open flight than government regs that's making simple gyros extinct.
 

aerialvisitor

Gold Supporter
Joined
May 1, 2009
Messages
222
Location
Jacksonville, Fl
Total Flight Time
1000+
For years I have been reading the arguments about only allowing us to buy a single place before moving to a 2-place. It is certain that any accident will only injure the pilot in a single place. Point given. But I would argue that all fixed-wing pilots start out in a 2-place aircraft, and having the second seat doesn't seem to be that much of an issue. I agree that you probably shouldn't carry another person until you've flown at least 100 hours solo. I am aware that many fixed-wing pilots carry a pax with less than 50-hours solo. When I first got my license, I realized how little I really knew about flying with only 50 hours of total flight time. I'm reminded that many pilots flew in WWII with less time than that. It doesn't matter how many hours you gain because it takes years to gain the experience that every passenger wishes you had. But I believe that our age-profile in the gyro community, and the maturity that comes with it, is sufficient to allow us buying a 2-place and self-limiting the carrying of a passenger until we've reached a sufficient level of experience (as determined by fewer and fewer butt tightening moments per flight). Based on the fixed-wing 2-seat environment, maybe we're trying to fix a problem that doesn't really exist. Sufficient training is the key. Certainly the 2-seat gyro manufacturers in Europe feel the same way. Just a thought.
 

feedpro

Newbie
Joined
Dec 6, 2010
Messages
292
Location
Chadron, NE
Aircraft
Sonex homebuilt, Vortex M912
Total Flight Time
6700+ 96 hours gyro
As a 6700+ hour commercial bush pilot for 51 years, I have a different view of the gyroplane then most here.
My first flight in a gyroplane took my breath away, because it was so totally different then flying a fixed wing. At first I was scared to death of sitting out in the open, strapped to a seat, a motor behind and a big rotor above, because I was afraid of falling off my perch, but all that changed after just one hour flying with Jim Vanek of Sport Copter in Oregon. I was hooked because of the gyro's ability to do things in the air that a fixed wing can not do, like turning on a dime, like landing with out any roll, making vertical descents, then pushing over to gain speed to 45 mph for a spot landing and then there is slow flight that is much slower then a fixed wing.
I have no intention of ever taking anyone for a ride in the gyro, I have a fixed wing for that purpose as it is a go fast airplane, my gyro is my low and slow, fun machine and I do not ever fly it like a fixed wing as most here do. I never land on hard surface. It will land and take off anywhere, even out of the roughest ground because it requires so little room to become airborne.
My wife does not like to fly, except to get to grandkids in a hurry.
I make trips of a maximum of 100 miles from my home base field in my gyro. My fixed wing goes more then twice as fast and is a lot more comfortable, so you know which one I choose for long flights.
 
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wfcentral

Newbie
Joined
Apr 19, 2016
Messages
19
Location
Wichita Falls, Tx
what if you got a two seat dominator and just plan on flying it for a few hundred hours solo until you are 100% ready to take on passengers - then you don't have to worry about selling and buying another gyro.

Also, where can you get a dominator kit to build yourself? I can't seem to locate them... (oops - nevermind - found it http://www.rotorflightdynamicsinc.com)

Also, is there another inexpensive two seater starter gyro anyone would recommend...

Just want to do some daydream research and watch some videos...
 
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