Bensen B7 (Garage Find!) SOLD

BAP4short

Newbie
Joined
Apr 25, 2021
Messages
4
Location
Cambridge, Ne
Selling my fathers Bensen B7, It has been in the rafters of his garage since the mid 60's. From the paperwork, price-lists and spec sheets I found, it was probably built around 1957. I believe it had a motor at one time based on the mount behind the seat and a fuel tank I found in the attach. One side of the rotor has heavy damage. I can provide better pictures once we get it down.

Have no idea what this is worth, just looking for a fair price and good home.


Bensen B7.jpgBensen B7 Papers.jpgBensen B7 (2).jpg
 

j4flyer

Member
Joined
Apr 7, 2004
Messages
291
Location
Woodland, Ca
It’s a nice piece of history. Your dad must have been a great craftsman to have made such a fine example of an early Bensen. As to value I’m afraid there isn’t much monetary value , more sentimental. You might consider donating it to the PRA museum or one in your area and taking a tax deduction.
 

BAP4short

Newbie
Joined
Apr 25, 2021
Messages
4
Location
Cambridge, Ne
It’s a nice piece of history. Your dad must have been a great craftsman to have made such a fine example of an early Bensen. As to value I’m afraid there isn’t much monetary value , more sentimental. You might consider donating it to the PRA museum or one in your area and taking a tax deduction.
Thanks for the input! I didn't expect it to be worth much but want to make sure there isn't someone out there that could still get some joy out of it.
 

Gyro28866

David McCutchen
Joined
May 8, 2009
Messages
1,925
Location
Dickson, Tn. USA
Aircraft
Benson B7m & B8m, Dominator II; Kolb Mark III Classic
Total Flight Time
750 combined FW & Gyro
The Bensens were 6061-T6 aluminum tubing that was bolted together (see your plans).
B7m was round tube and B8m were square tube. The B7 started as a Glider and then Dr. Bensen modified it into the B7m engine version.
As for weight, I would expect this welded steel frame to be much heavier than an aluminum tube.
Yours most likely started as a towed Glider and then modified later. Notice the nose wheel is free caster held straight with a set of springs, the engine modified version had to have nosewheel steering tied into the rudder system.
and obviously an overhead stick for control with a Spindle head for the rotor.
Actually, the plans and literature have more value than the frame.
 

BAP4short

Newbie
Joined
Apr 25, 2021
Messages
4
Location
Cambridge, Ne
The Bensens were 6061-T6 aluminum tubing that was bolted together (see your plans).
B7m was round tube and B8m were square tube. The B7 started as a Glider and then Dr. Bensen modified it into the B7m engine version.
As for weight, I would expect this welded steel frame to be much heavier than an aluminum tube.
Yours most likely started as a towed Glider and then modified later. Notice the nose wheel is free caster held straight with a set of springs, the engine modified version had to have nosewheel steering tied into the rudder system.
and obviously an overhead stick for control with a Spindle head for the rotor.
Actually, the plans and literature have more value than the frame.
Yes, I see the differences on the plans now. Thanks for the added info!

The frame is mostly a streamlined steel tubing. I kind of suspected the the literature may be the only thing of value. Surprisingly it survived in nothing more than a manila folder on the self of the garage for over 50 years.
 

Martin W.

Active Member
Joined
May 10, 2020
Messages
323
Location
Winnipeg
It’s a nice piece of history. Your dad must have been a great craftsman to have made such a fine example of an early Bensen. As to value I’m afraid there isn’t much monetary value , more sentimental. You might consider donating it to the PRA museum or one in your area and taking a tax deduction.
I agree completely that it has value as a 1957 collector - museum piece .... I hope someone steps forward to acquire it and reward the seller for preserving it all these years .

The gyro industry began with this early example and has now become worldwide .

Even if I was a modern European or American gyro manufacturer I would love to have this sitting in my showroom.

It is a great example of how it all started.
 
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