Aviomania Genesis - Kerrville

I sure am. Flying every chance I get and working on improving everything.

After the rotor strike and everything that followed this is really a great feeling. Folks at the airport have been super.

Local medevac crew even cheered when I did my first crow hops!
 
I sure am. Flying every chance I get and working on improving everything.

After the rotor strike and everything that followed this is really a great feeling. Folks at the airport have been super.

Local medevac crew even cheered when I did my first crow hops!
That’s awesome. It’s nice when you are wanted. Been to so many Airports where it’s run like the good ole boys club. They hate anyone not in their club. They also hate gyros.
 
First experience here was when I first brought my Genesis out to taxi around without the blades on. Airport Assoc President came out and looked around, then gave me the gate code! Came back and did some taxiing with the blades on, no issues. No hangar space available so spoke with the President of Kerrville Aviation and explained what I was going to do. He said he would find space for me. Fast forward about 6 months and with a repaired Genesis again approached the KA Pres. Again, no problem and they made me feel right at home with all of the big planes! Moved me around as needed. Eric flew over one day so we could do some pattern work in his 2 place machine and we had an electrical issue. Approached the Medevac crew and they loaned me a propane soldering iron but they had no solder. Went to another Maint hangar and they gave me some silver solder and flux. While I was repairing the electrical issue the entire Medevac crew came out and talked with us.

I ended up blocked in the middle of my hangar and the main crew unstacked 4 planes and moved my Genesis so that I could get it in and out easily.

Then stumbled into permanent hangar space thanks to a Cub owner that I talked with.

This whole experience has been super. (except for the Airport Manager!)
 
FLYCOM should be paying you advertising for that product placement :)

It will probably be warm again by the time my kit gets here.

Rusty
 
Here's a short clip of my last outing. Doing lots of touch and gos traffic permitting!
Very nice. It looks like you held it off until very little groundspeed remained. It was clear the nose wheel stayed off the ground until the aircraft had stopped. I can't emphasis enough how important this is. Instructors could use these few seconds of video to show how it should be done.

When people watch this clip, I hope they understand that by holding the nose wheel off like this that you make it impossible for the nose to dart off to one side during the landing and therefore make it impossible to lose directional control.

Good job.

Jim
 
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Very nice. It looks like you held it off until very little groundspeed remained. It was clear the nose wheel stayed off the ground until the aircraft had stopped.

When people watch this clip, I hope they understand that by holding the nose wheel off like this that you make it impossible for the nose to dart off to one side, during the landing, and therefore make it impossible to lose directional control.

Good job.

Jim
Thanks Jim, all I can hear is Ben saying "hold it off, hold it off".
 
Nice nice. I loved when I got good enough to land hold the nose wheel off and proceed with my next takeoff without touching it.
I appreciate what you're saying Mike. As an instructional point however, I much prefer the way Bobby has demonstrated this landing.

When the groundspeed is zero, the stick is full aft, and the nose wheel drops on its own, the touchdown phase of the flight is finished. Of course, we still have to manage the rotor, but the landing itself is essentially over.

Too many folks touch down with some forward speed then immediately start a takeoff roll. Most of the time nothing bad happens. But by doing it the way Bobby has demonstrated, variables are reduced, and, in my opinion, safety is enhanced.

Jim
 
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