AR-1 N57AR - Texas - 20.8.23

Standard standards and those standard to you but not standard to others standards !
Even more confusing when the unit has the same name, but different values :
The US gallon is worth 3.78 liters, while the imperial gallon is worth around 4.54 liters!
 
The manual for my old British motorcycle says it has a six gallon tank, which suprisingly has always held more than seven. Eventually, I realized I was buying U.S. gallons while they were describing Imperial. Never seemed to run into that issue when adding a quart of oil.
 
Different units are often the source of errors
Kt (knot) is for nautical mile per hour
mph is for US mile per hour
km/h is for 1000 meters per hour
m/s (meter per second) is used in scientific calculations
ft/mn ( foot per minute) tis used for aircraft ascent and descent
Right... that's why putting "kph" on a graph is just a bit ambiguous, being none of the above.
 
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The manual for my old British motorcycle says it has a six gallon tank, which suprisingly has always held more than seven. Eventually, I realized I was buying U.S. gallons while they were describing Imperial. Never seemed to run into that issue when adding a quart of oil.
There's more to drink in a pint at a pub in the UK too.
Evidently the "imperial" gallon, which dates from 1824, is based on the volume of ten pounds of water.
A US gallon of water is about eight pounds (and a US gallon of "gasoline" is about six, as most aviators know). Eight pounds is nicely divisible into quarts (2 lbs) and pints (1 lb).
:)
 
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There's more to drink in a pint at a pub in the UK too.
Evidently the "imperial" gallon, which dates from 1824, is based on the volume of ten pounds of water.
A US gallon of water is about eight pounds (and a US gallon of "gasoline" is about six, as most aviators know). Eight pounds is nicely divisible into quarts (2 lbs) and pints (1 lb).
:)
Well, you just need to think in terms more like five quarts (linguistically awkward, but what the heck if the division works). So if you buy a fifth of Bourbon, did you ever think 1/5 of what?
 

Abbreviations​

Abbreviations for "kilometres per hour" did not appear in the English language until the late nineteenth century.

The kilometre, a unit of length, first appeared in English in 1810,[9] and the compound unit of speed "kilometers per hour" was in use in the US by 1866.[10] "Kilometres per hour" did not begin to be abbreviated in print until many years later, with several different abbreviations existing near-contemporaneously.

With no central authority to dictate the rules for abbreviations (other than the official km/h symbol dictated by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures), various publishing houses have their own rules that dictate whether to use upper-case letters, lower-case letters, periods and so on, reflecting both changes in fashion and the image of the publishing house concerned.[28] For example, news organisations such as Reuters[29] and The Economist[30] require "kph".
 
Well, you just need to think in terms more like five quarts (linguistically awkward, but what the heck if the division works). So if you buy a fifth of Bourbon, did you ever think 1/5 of what?
I'm a bit confused by your first sentence, but a "fifth" was always just one-fifth of a gallon. These have not been sold in nearly fifty years. I was not anywhere near drinking age when these were discontinued, but I realize some of y'all were. ;)
I don't hear anyone calling the current standard bottle of liquor (or wine) a 3/4 liter, but that's what it is...
 
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