Adding Sport Pilot, Gyroplane.

Vance

Gyroplane CFI
Because I don’t have a very good memory I often pull out the Federal Aviation Regulations to answer questions. I have slightly modified the details of the exchange so that it fits more people.

I was talking with a pilot at Bensen Days and he was describing what he was doing to earn a Sport Pilot, Gyroplane rating. He held a private pilot single engine land pilot certificate.
[h=1]He had been looking at 14 CFR § 61.313 - What aeronautical experience must I have to apply for a sport pilot certificate?[/h] (1.) 20 hours of flight time, including 15 hours of flight training from an authorized instructor in a gyroplane and at least 5 hours of solo flight training in the areas of operation listed in § 61.311 . [h=1](i) 2 hours of cross-country flight training, (ii) 10 takeoffs and landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport, (iii) One solo cross-country flight of at least 50 nautical miles total distance, with a full-stop landing at a minimum of two points, and one segment of the flight consisting of a straight-line distance of at least 25 nautical miles between takeoff and landing locations, and (iv) 2 hours of flight training with an authorized instructor on those areas of operation specified in § 61.311 in preparation for the practical test within the preceding 2 calendar months from the month of the test.[/h] [h=1][/h] I directed him to § 61.321: How do I obtain privileges to operate an additional category or class of light-sport aircraft?

If you hold a sport pilot certificate and seek to operate an additional category or class of
light-sport aircraft, you must -
(a) Receive a logbook endorsement from the
authorized instructor who trained you on the applicable aeronautical knowledge areas specified in § 61.309 and areas of operation specified in § 61.311. The endorsement certifies you have met the aeronautical knowledge and flight proficiency requirements for the additional light-sport aircraft privilege you seek;
(b) Successfully complete a proficiency check from an
authorized instructor other than the instructor who trained you on the aeronautical knowledge areas and areas of operation specified in §§ 61.309 and 61.311 for the additional light-sport aircraft privilege you seek;
(c) Complete an application for those privileges on a form and in a manner acceptable to the
FAA and present this application to the authorized instructor who conducted the proficiency check specified in paragraph (b) of this section; and
(d) Receive a logbook endorsement from the instructor who conducted the proficiency check specified in
paragraph (b) of this section certifying you are proficient in the applicable areas of operation and aeronautical knowledge areas, and that you are authorized for the additional category and class light-sport aircraft privilege.

He had already demonstrated all the flight proficiency requirements listed in FAR 61.311 so all his gyroplane flight instructor needed to do was fill our form 8710-11 and refer him to another CFI for his proficiency check ride.
[h=1]I suspect that some others have made this error so I thought I would share this story. [/h]
If you want to see the wording or FAR 61.311 just type it into the search window or borrow someone’s copy of the FAR/AIM.
 

AirCommandPilot

Just a fledgeling
There has also been a question about a PPL holder with fixed wing land soloing in his own single place machine, to get the solo and cross country hours. As I understand it, I can fly solo in my machine under my PPL, FWL with no endorsement, but to get the sport or private addon, I would need the aforementioned hours and checkride?
 

JEFF TIPTON

Senior Member
Would depend on the operating limitations that were issued for the particular aircraft.

Some of the older limitations only required a pilot certificate.

Most issued will require a certificate in the category and class.
 
Top