360's - SOP for gyro in "see & avoid" situation!

Question: In the latest revision of the AIM, the sentence "Helicopters must avoid the flow of fixed wing traffic" can only be found in 4-3-2b which applies during landings at towered airports. Most helicopter pilots use that same procedure at uncontrolled airports, but they replace "must" with "should."

Do gyro pilots prefer to avoid the flow of fixed-wing traffic or do you want to be in the conga-line with planes?
 
Question: In the latest revision of the AIM, the sentence "Helicopters must avoid the flow of fixed wing traffic" can only be found in 4-3-2b which applies during landings at towered airports. Most helicopter pilots use that same procedure at uncontrolled airports, but they replace "must" with "should."

Do gyro pilots prefer to avoid the flow of fixed-wing traffic or do you want to be in the conga-line with planes?
My experience at an uncontrolled airport is we want nothing to do with the conga line. Our patterns are much tighter at a lower altitude.

At Wauchula we followed a right hand pattern at 500 feet. Most of the time we happily coexisted with the fixed wing traffic as long as we were correctly announcing on the radio. The instructors that bring their students from other areas are familiar with Gyros and probably brief the students. It can get a little rough when the student is a non native English speaker. Most of the guys there are Native central Floridians and can have a pretty strong Southern accent.

There are a few Helicopters that come in and get fuel. Most of them are R-44’s and R-22’s. They typically don’t use the pattern and announce pretty far out and do a straight in approach very low and go directly to the gas pumps. They usually depart in the direction they came in and are not a factor in the two patterns.
 
There is an Advisory Circular that directly addresses this for gyros, and endorses flying a closer lower pattern in the same pattern side as airplanes.


In the case of a gyroplane approaching to land, the gyroplane pilot operating in the traffic pattern when landing on the runway may fly a pattern similar to the fixed-wing aircraft traffic pattern but at a lower altitude (500 feet above ground level (AGL)) and closer to the runway. This runway pattern may be on the opposite side of the runway from fixed-wing traffic only when airspeed requires it or for practice power-off landings and if local policy permits. Landings not on the runway should avoid the flow of fixed-wing traffic
 
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