23 March 2022 West TX N430HS

GyrOZprey

Aussie in Kansas.
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Messages
3,520
Location
Whitewater KS
Aircraft
Butterfly Aurora N5560Z / Titanium Explorer N456TE & N488TE/ - trained in MTOsport 446QT/488FB
Total Flight Time
1050
With the You-Tuber Dan's ( M& G) followers hating on gyropilots in their YT comments section - I came across this interesting interview with Juan Browne!



I noted it in my US gyro accident (2019-2023) stats that I summarized a few months ago. ...although I could not find any reference to it here!

It was recorded in gyro accidents blogspot as....
March 23rd 2022 - Lubbock, Texas, USA - Groen Brothers Sparrow Hawk III - N430HS - The FAA ASIAS report states - "AIRCRAFT ENCOUNTERED A GUST OF WIND DURING ROLL OUT FOR DEPARTURE AND CRASHED, LUBBOCK, TX." - injury none - damage substantial
 
Low time pilot in a new to him machine.
 
Telling comment I got to rotate speed and pulled back. Sounds like typical fixed wing pilot trying to fly it like a fixed wing not a gyro. His whole diatribe about the accident at Oshkosh now holds no water whatsoever in my opinion. This sounds like high speed blade flap. Just another self important YouTuber.
 
He visited Loch Ness & "got back on the horse" ..a few months after!

 
Telling comment I got to rotate speed and pulled back. Sounds like typical fixed wing pilot trying to fly it like a fixed wing not a gyro. His whole diatribe about the accident at Oshkosh now holds no water whatsoever in my opinion. This sounds like high speed blade flap. Just another self important YouTuber.
Before I even read your comment Mike, I posted a comment under Dan's video on rumble telling him that my opinion was his airplane technique of "rotating and pulling back" at a target speed was the cause of his crash and if he had balanced on his mains until the gyro took off on its own with no pilot input, his takeoff would have most likely been successful. His credibility about everything related to aviation has diminished, in my opinion. I feel that if you are going to put yourself out there as an expert, your posted words need to be substantially right at least 90% of the time. I've never flown a gyro but I promise, if I were ever taking off in a gyro, I'd run off the end of the runway before I'd pull back to rotate.

I do need to say however, his accident really has nothing to do with his believing or disbelieving the NTSB got it right on the Oshkosh midair. That has more to do with putting a lot of trust in our institutions such as the courts, the police, the clergy, and everyone that must get a professional license.
 
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Full back is the proper procedure for a takeoff roll. Full back angles the rotor disk into the relative wind and continues to increase the Rotor RPM. If you don't angle back, your rotor RPM will decay as your airspeed increases; at that point, a pull back on the cyclic will end up in a blade flap as the forward blade has a large amount of lift and the retreating blade has very little if any.
 
I've never flown a gyro but I promise, if I were ever taking off in a gyro, I'd run off the end of the runway before I'd pull back to rotate.
I'm no expert, but the 3 gyro's (+ 1 towed by a truck) that I have flow so far have all SCREAMED to get in the air early.
You do not have to rotate, it will do this by itself and you have to intervene....
The full back tilt causes the nose to suddenly rise and you have to quickly put it back down, balance on the mains, or for rough field, let it start to lift off and level off at one foot to continue acceleration to flight speed in ground effect (Did I say that out loud?)
Anything other than keeping it from leaving the ground prematurely will risk a partial takeoff behind the power curve.
I have not learned to anticipate the rotation and stop it as it's happening yet, but it's not rocket science and reacting to the rotation will still produce an acceptable takeoff...
There are a lot of videos showing this with the following roll over.

Everything happens in a very short time from the initial rotation and the timing is what you learn to condense and refine as you get better and get to know the aircraft.
From a beginners point of view (With a long history of test piloting very strange unmanned aircraft),
I would have to say this is the most critical part of gyro flight and where a lot of nuance needs to be developed.
My approach of training wherever I can with different instructors has a drawback of not getting use to a particular aircraft although as a test pilot, that has worked well for me because I don't want to expect something on a first flight and let muscle memory take over...

I think as a Heli pilot, as soon as the nose popped up, you would instinctively level it a bit knowing that the sudden jump should be moderated.
I don't think you would have any issues..
 
Yes, of course there are two phases to a takeoff roll in a gyro that lacks full-RRPM prerotation. You begin with full aft stick and partial throttle.

As RRPM comes up, Your aft-tilted rotor will slow the machine down. That's your cue to feed in more throttle to maintain speed. Once the nosewheel rises, you have most of your RRPM. Roll in the rest of the throttle and drop the nose with forward stick until it's just off the deck. The gyro will fly off in this attitude. You don't need to "pop it off" by adding back stick again.
 
With the You-Tuber Dan's ( M& G) followers hating on gyropilots in their YT comments section - I came across this interesting interview with Juan Browne!



I noted it in my US gyro accident (2019-2023) stats that I summarized a few months ago. ...although I could not find any reference to it here!

It was recorded in gyro accidents blogspot as....

LMAO. The dude flapped the rotors on takeoff plain and simple and has no clue what happened. "Pre-rotatred to to right RPM and got to rotate speed and slight pullback". Yeah that is exactly what you do not do. Typical fixed wing pilot without enough understanding or training.
 
I’m pretty sure the gyro up the Potomac has already been done. The resulting emergency landing on the capitol lawn wasn’t viewed in a good light. Did us as a community no good for our public image either. Doug is a friend. I was behind him on his second solo flight when his gear box went out and watched him make a perfect landing.
 
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