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Doug Riley
Doug Riley
Platinum Member
Last Activity: Yesterday, 09:03 AM
Joined: 01-11-2004
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  • Doug Riley
    replied to Teeter bolt sheer strength
    The strength we've been discussing is shear ("sheer" refers to women's stockings, a different topic entirely). For a part to be loaded in shear, the load and the (opposing) reaction to the load must be right next to each other -- just as the two blades of a pair of scissors (or shears) come...
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  • Was the stress-testing done in a fatigue tester, or did it use steady-state loading? In either case, were all the loads considered? Things like the torsional loading of prerotation, possible hard flapping loads from poor takeoff technique and 2/rev loads attributable to the semi-rigid rotor?
    ...
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  • Doug Riley
    replied to Suzuki
    I have nothing specific to report about Suzis. Any time you propose putting a surface-vehicle engine in an aircraft, though, remember the "duty cycle" issue. Surface vehicles don't use that much power at cruise (especially motorcycles) . They use full power typically for only seconds at...
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  • JM -- I have some hundreds of hours in an Air Command, including landing on unprepared surfaces.

    Yes, the link between the pedals and the nosewheel is soft -- but the nose still will turn abruptly when it touches the ground while the pilot is holding rudder. Maybe it's possible to use...
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  • I've wrestled a Dominator out of a duck-walk without capsizing, but a successful escape isn't always possible.

    I also rolled one over, though, in a situation unrelated to duck-walk. My tandem Dom had a violent nosewheel shimmy early in its career. As a result, I kept the nosewheel off during...
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  • Doug Riley
    replied to Taildragger Pusher Concept
    No reason to re-invent the wheel. The Buhl company built a pusher taildragger autogyro under license from Cierva in the early 1930's. There's an original Buhl pusher in a museum, possibly in California(?) Lots of photos on the 'Net.

    Note that the pilot area of the Buhl is located quite...
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  • Doug Riley
    replied to 4-seat gyrocopters
    You are a classical-language scholar, sir. In the fifties and sixties, when Bensen started marketing his inventions, there was a plethora of ----copters. In general, cornball names for products were high fashion. We had hobbi-copters, the Hoppi-copter, the Jeri-copter, the Youmercopter and probably...
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  • Doug Riley
    replied to 4-seat gyrocopters
    A couple observations:

    The artwork accompanying this post appears to be a digital painting, not a photo of actual hardware. A/k/a vaporware.

    The term "gyrocopter" is not normally applied to cabin-class gyroplanes such the Groen Hawk, or even the 2-place Xenon, upon...
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  • "Pure CLT" isn't necessary to make a gyro angle-of-attack stable. An effective horizontal stabilizer will do just as well.

    BUT the key word here is "effective." The design and placement of the H-stab must be such that, among other things, the nose rises to meet downdrafts,...
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  • While it is true that zero G flight is not advisable in most gyroplanes, it's equally true that zero G is INEVITABLE if you treat your gyro as a real aircraft. That is, if you do more than fly it around the pattern at the glassy-calm moments around sunset/sunrise.

    On full throttle takeoff...
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