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What is the minimum required to become a Gyroplane PVT pilot if have a INST PVT SEL?

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  • What is the minimum required to become a Gyroplane PVT pilot if have a INST PVT SEL?

    what is required to become a Gyro plane pvt pilot if i have PVT INST SEL already? Also what is needed to move on to Commercial and Instructor ratings?

  • #2
    Contact Dayton Dabbs at Lone Star Magni Gyro (512-750-0332). He is an experienced instructor and gyro DPE who has transitioned many SEL private pilots to gyro sport pilot endorsements and gyro private pilot licenses. He will be able to answer your questions and may be able to point you in the right direction based on your location. As I recall when I transitioned to gyros, it was about eight hours of training before my gyro sport endorsement check ride. I eventually went ahead and got my gyro private license which required night dual hours and some gyro experience into towered airports. Ray

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    • #3
      For Private Pilot, Rotorcraft-Gyroplane I went to what I feel is the relevant FAR.

      FAR 61.109 (d)
      For a gyroplane rating. Except as provided in paragraph (k) of this section, a person who applies for a private pilot certificate with rotorcraft category and gyroplane class rating must log at least 40 hours of flight time that includes at least 20 hours of flight training from an authorized instructor and 10 hours of solo flight training in the areas of operation listed in §61.107(b)(4) of this part, and the training must include at least:
      (1) 3 hours of cross-country flight training in a gyroplane;
      (2) Except as provided in §61.110 of this part, 3 hours of night flight training in a gyroplane that includes—
      (i) One cross-country flight of over 50 nautical miles total distance; and
      (ii) 10 takeoffs and 10 landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport.
      (3) 3 hours of flight training with an authorized instructor in a gyroplane in preparation for the practical test, which must have been performed within the preceding 2 calendar months from the month of the test; and
      (4) 10 hours of solo flight time in a gyroplane, consisting of at least:
      (i) 3 hours of cross-country time;
      (ii) One solo cross country flight of 100 nautical miles total distance, with landings at three points, and one segment of the flight being a straight-line distance of more than 25 nautical miles between the takeoff and landing locations; and
      (iii) Three takeoffs and three landings to a full stop (with each landing involving a flight in the traffic pattern) at an airport with an operating control tower.

      For Sport Pilot, Gyroplane add on you need to train to proficiency and pass a proficiency check ride with another CFI. There is no knowledge test and no minimums and no solo time required. Typical would be ten hours of dual. Some are faster.
      Regards, Vance Breese Gyroplane CFI http://www.breeseaircraft.com/

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      • #4
        If you're interested in Comm, I suggest going straight to that; I too am an ASEL Instrument and first got my pvt pilot then opted to go for Comm. You really don't need to stop at pvt pilot if you're headed for Comm, I learned later. I did mine with Dayton - he's excellent. He works with Scott Thomas, who will get you your 3 hours for the endorsement since Dayton is a DPE. Scott, too, is excellent.

        Not sure what gyro you fly or want to fly but while Dayton will work with you in many different types, he's a Magni salesman. After a LOT of homework I personally bought a Magni M-16 via Dayton. Anyway, he has trained people in Autogyros, ELAs, American Rangers, and a few others, I believe.

        /Ed

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        • #5
          If you are already a private pilot....and want to fly an experimental single place gyroplane.........you can do so without getting a gyroplane rating. That is because you are flying an experimental aircraft and not taking passengers. If you vary from this, then the above applies.
          Last edited by OuterMarker; 08-24-2018, 05:53 AM. Reason: more comments

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          • #6
            Originally posted by OuterMarker View Post
            If you are already a private pilot....and want to fly an experimental single place gyroplane.........you can do so without getting a gyroplane rating. That is because you are flying an experimental aircraft and not taking passengers. If you vary from this, then the above applies.
            I have not seen an exemption like that in the Federal Aviation Regulations unless it is an ultralight Albert.

            In my opinion flying a gyroplane solo without a certificate that specifically lists gyroplanes or a solo signoff is prohibited by the Federal Aviation Regulations.

            In my opinion flying a gyroplane without instruction would be poor aviation decision making and substantially elevate the risk.
            Regards, Vance Breese Gyroplane CFI http://www.breeseaircraft.com/

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            • #7
              Originally posted by OuterMarker View Post
              ...you can do so without getting a gyroplane rating. That is because you are flying an experimental aircraft and not taking passengers.
              This is no longer true, unless you're flying an older machine. It is not FAR 61 which determines this, but the operating limitations of each specific aircraft.

              The operating limitations issued to experimental gyroplanes used to require a pilot certificate with category and class, but did not specify it had to be Rotorcraft / Gyroplane. This was allowing many airplane pilots to jump into gyros with no training, with predictable results. I suspect it was a vestige of the early gyro days, when there were no no two-seat trainers.

              Any gyro built in the last ten years or so will have operating limitations which require Rotorcraft / Gyroplane category and class, or an appropriate endorsement from an instructor. That endorsement provision is there to allow students to solo during training, but CFIs can also issue an endorsement authorizing a pilot to fly a specific aircraft (as in a specific tail number) without a 90-day expiration. I don't think that gets used much, however, because of the liability implications for the instructor.

              It is much easier to find instruction and get the appropriate Sport Pilot practical test than it was 10 years ago. Airmale, your nearest instructor is probably Britta Penca, based at the San Manuel (AZ) Airport. (520) 840-0951. She's an excellent instructor.
              Last edited by PW_Plack; 08-25-2018, 11:38 AM.
              Paul W. Plack
              Private ASEL, SP Gyroplane
              Secretary, URA & PRA2
              Editor, Western Rotorcraft

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