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Situation with ASTM and LSA gyroplane under FAA

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  • Situation with ASTM and LSA gyroplane under FAA

    What is the issue with gyroplanes that prompted FAA to remove them from LSA standards?
    Thanks
    (I thought this thing was resolved long ago)
    Moving on! :)

  • #2
    It appears to me that many gyroplanes meet the FAA Light Sport Aircraft rules Heron.

    In my opinion that has not changed since the beginning of the FAA Light Sport Aircraft program.
    Regards, Vance Breese Gyroplane CFI http://www.breeseaircraft.com/

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    • #3
      Hi Vance,

      I believe he is asking why is there no S-LSA gyroplanes. I recall that a consensus standard could not be reached. I don't know details but as you state most modern gyroplanes meet the light sport rules and can be flown by sport pilots.

      Don

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      • #4
        I thought about that Don.

        As far as I know there has not been a change in the FAA Light Sport rules other than the first few months.

        Heron is in Bauru, Sao Paulo, Brazil so sometimes he can be out of touch with the FAA.

        I try not to imagine what he might be asking.
        Regards, Vance Breese Gyroplane CFI http://www.breeseaircraft.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          Heron asked,
          "What is the issue with gyroplanes that prompted FAA to remove them from LSA standards?
          Thanks
          (I thought this thing was resolved long ago)"

          and Vance responded,
          "It appears to me that many gyroplanes meet the FAA Light Sport Aircraft rules Heron.

          In my opinion that has not changed since the beginning of the FAA Light Sport Aircraft program."

          --------

          One of the most confusing issues about light-sport gyroplanes in regard to certification is distinguishing which certification you're talking about: airman certification or aircraft certification.

          When the FAA ushered in the Light-Sport Aircraft/Sport Pilot regulations in 2004, gyroplanes were not allowed, and still are not allowed, to be issued an airworthiness certificate in the Special Light-Sport Aircraft (SLSA) category; yet pilots were (and still are) allowed a Sport Pilot airman certification to fly gyroplanes that meet the specifications in the FAA's Part 1 definitions.

          Here's an article that tries to distinguish the different certications:
          http://www.lightsportgyroplanes.com/...p?feature=2046

          Based upon Heron's subject line, I think he's asking about aircraft certification; that is, why are gyroplanes not allowed SLSA certification?

          The answer to that question is a long one and has been discussed in some length in previous posts, but the short answer is because the FAA said so, and its position is embedded in FAA Part 21.190(a), which reads
          " 21.190 Issue of a special airworthiness certificate for a light-sport category aircraft.
          (a)Purpose. The FAA issues a special airworthiness certificate in the light-sport category to operate a light-sport aircraft other than a gyroplane"

          It's now been fourteen years since the LSA/SP regulations were implemented and gyroplanes are still the only category/class of aircraft that Sport Pilots may fly that are not allowed to have an SLSA airworthiness certificate.

          The question "What is the issue with gyroplanes that prompted FAA to remove them from LSA standards?" is a little confusing. Gyroplanes were never removed from the (S)LSA "standards" because they were never included to begin with. As to why gyroplanes were originally excluded from SLSA certiication, the FAA attempted to explain that in the LSA/SP Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, and here's an article that may help explain--but not justify--the FAA's position.

          http://www.LightSportGyroplanes.com/?feature=2001

          Ira
          Last edited by RotorRambler; 08-22-2018, 05:01 PM.

          More Light-Sport Gyroplanes: The 2017 supplement
          for Light-Sport Gyroplanes

          Both books now available at www.Amazon.com

          Comment


          • #6
            And to add to the confusion, we register aircraft as E-AB (experimental amateur built) and fly with a sport pilot license as long as the aircraft meets the limitations of sport pilot rules. Trivia - my 1946 Ercoupe happened to fit under the sport pilot limitations so it is a certified aircraft legal for sport pilots but it is NOT an LSA. It still requires a shop to do the annual, just like any other certified plane. I believe that there are a couple of other planes that accidentally fit sport pilot rules. So there you go, another layer of confusion.

            A sport pilot can fly any aircraft that meets the limitations of the sport pilot license regardless of how it is registered EAB, SLSA, or certified (weight and speed are the two biggies)

            Back when they created Sport Pilot it would have been much easier to simply allow the little known Recreational Pilot classification to fly under a drivers license medical. Fast forward and Rec Pilot and Private Pilot are essentially issued with a drivers license medical. Way to go FAA.
            Last edited by HighAltitude; 08-22-2018, 05:34 PM.

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