Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Dubai - WAG - Gyro down 9.12.15

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Here's what gives the Magni its angle of attack stability along with a heavy stick and limited agility:
    Click image for larger version

Name:	Magni rotor.JPG
Views:	1
Size:	170.0 KB
ID:	1141575

    Comment


    • in a Zero G situation at the top of an elliptic trajectory full throtlle does this profil help not to tilt forward ?

      Comment


      • With nose heavy rotor blades, where the chordwise CG leads the aerodynamic center, the blades untwist when the load is reduced; in other words, its something like having an increase of collective pitch as load is reduced. This makes it more difficult to get into zero Gs and requires more forward stick when going over the top in order to unload the rotor.

        On the other hand, a properly designed gyroplane with CLT and propeller torque elimination can tolerate momentary zero Gs without the need for prosthetic devices. They dont need wooden legs.

        Comment


        • While it is true that zero G flight is not advisable in most gyroplanes, it's equally true that zero G is INEVITABLE if you treat your gyro as a real aircraft. That is, if you do more than fly it around the pattern at the glassy-calm moments around sunset/sunrise.

          On full throttle takeoff in normal conditions, sooner or later you will hit a downdraft that will put you momentarily into zero G. If you are flying something like an unmodified RAF-2000 or first-generation Air Command, you'll snap the throttle closed and then cautiously open it again.

          In a gyro with a pitch-stable fuselage, OTOH, you don't have to do any of that. Hold the stick still and leave the throttle alone. The nose will not pitch down in the downdraft; if anything, it will pitch up to meet the downdraft. You won't have to interrupt your climb and risk not clearing the hill or trees up ahead.

          Comment


          • I don't know if I am doing things right , please correct me if I am wrong
            When I get in strong turbulences, first of all I reduce my air speed down to 100 km/h, I don't know if it is a good thing but at least it seems that the gyro shakes less ..
            secondly when I notice the pressure btw my bottom and the seat reduces I reduce power even more going down to 5100 rpm ( out of 6500 max)
            I do this even if my gyro never changes it's attitude in up or down drafts
            But as you are saying I never have to move the stick ahead of backward in order to keep the gyro horizontal ( I can feel the gyro goes up or down fast but it's it attitude does not change), and this even if my HS stab is not huge (but is has an 0012 airfoil).
            also I have never noticed big losses in terms of rotor RPM even in the worsts gust I have been through and believe me we have strong ones in the south of France with the strong wind called mistral that often blows at 80 km/h in certain places ( thank of god not everywhere).

            Comment


            • Originally posted by jm-urbani View Post
              I don't know if I am doing things right , please correct me if I am wrong
              When I get in strong turbulences, first of all I reduce my air speed down to 100 km/h, I don't know if it is a good thing but at least it seems that the gyro shakes less ..
              secondly when I notice the pressure btw my bottom and the seat reduces I reduce power even more going down to 5100 rpm ( out of 6500 max)
              I do this even if my gyro never changes it's attitude in up or down drafts
              But as you are saying I never have to move the stick ahead of backward in order to keep the gyro horizontal ( I can feel the gyro goes up or down fast but it's it attitude does not change), and this even if my HS stab is not huge (but is has an 0012 airfoil).
              also I have never noticed big losses in terms of rotor RPM even in the worsts gust I have been through and believe me we have strong ones in the south of France with the strong wind called mistral that often blows at 80 km/h in certain places ( thank of god not everywhere).
              In my opinion flying in strong turbulence (50kts of wind 20kt gusts) is to be avoided if practical.

              My personal limit for takeoff at my home airport of Santa Maria (KSMX) is 35kts with a 10kt gust spread. That is 64kph with a 19kph gust spread.

              I have returned to the airport to higher winds or a bigger gust spread and landed anyway or flown to an alternate airport. There is more to it than just wind speed or the gust spread.

              Rising or descending air is not likely to affect the attitude of a gyroplane because you are flying in a block of air.

              Wind shear is a sudden change in speed or direction over a relatively short distance.

              This may cause the gyroplane to pitch up or down.

              The most stable indicated air speed in turbulence is different for different gyroplanes and conditions.

              A control surface like a horizontal or vertical stabilizer generally works better the faster you go unless it is blocked by something like a wide body.

              Most gyroplanes I have flown do their best in moderate turbulence between 45kts (83kph) and 60kts (111kph).

              Most low time pilots over control in turbulent conditions. Stabbing at the cyclic simply doesn't do anything but slow the rotor down. I prefer to let the gyroplane do what it wants to do and just sort of heard it.

              I prefer coordinated flight in turbulence but manage it without a lot of rudder input.

              I have found that a down draft that I can't out climb will likely not force me all the way to the ground and the vertical speed of the descending air slows as I approach the ground.

              A collapsing thunderstorm or a microburst may take me all the way to the ground and it is part of why I stay 25 miles from thunderstorms.

              In my opinion it takes a sustained low g event to have the rotor slow down significantly and that is not likely to occur from a weather event.

              In The Predator and Puff (the Cavalon I was flying) I could not get a G meter to read below .6Gs no matter what I did or what turbulence I flew in.
              Regards, Vance Breese Gyroplane CFI http://www.breeseaircraft.com/

              Comment


              • your opinion counts for me, I hate flying in turbulence ... but no gust no glory !
                I am kidding of course
                I am low time so called pilot, I am scared in turbulence, but I dont over control the stick
                on the other hand ( normal the throtlle is in the other hand hahahaha) I have a tendency of reducing engine rpm too much whrn I feel the gyro going up or down ...
                but instead of avoinding flying in turbulence, I go flying in turbulence as soon as I can in order to gain confidence ... not easy for me...
                but of course when I feel that turbulence are too hard I go back to the hangar having a coffee
                thanks for your contribution Vance

                Comment

                Working...
                X