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  • #16
    Bensen dealer Harry Cordon of Arkansas died in a crash of a Windryder. Witness reports suggest a slip-roll couple instability, such as we've been seeing in some of the (very similarly configured) Euro-gyros. A low-mounted triple tail does not seem to prevent this type of instability, however much it does to compensate for HTL.

    A fellow named Jerry (can't recall his last name; I think he was a doctor) used to fly one up from VA to our regional U.L. flyin in western NY State. He had a 532. He flew with a group of FW ultralights, but he was so much faster that he had to fly circles and S-turns to avoid pulling ahead of them.

    His machine had a somewhat longer takeoff roll and shallower climb angle than an open gyro. I used to show off at the flyin by doing vertical pirouettes in my little 447 Air Command. Not to be outdone by some cheapo flying lawn chair, he did them, too, in the Windryder.

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    • #17
      It flew well. I had a fun time flying it. I did not do any hard slips as I felt that they would not be a safe maneuver. At slow speeds it has plenty of rudder to do vertical spins. It was fun to fly and it looks great.
      A well designed aircraft is important but no substitute for proper knowledge, attitude, and experience.

      Even duct tape can't fix stupid, but it can muffle the sound!

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Doug Riley View Post
        Bensen dealer Harry Cordon of Arkansas died in a crash of a Windryder. Witness reports suggest a slip-roll couple instability, such as we've been seeing in some of the (very similarly configured) Euro-gyros. A low-mounted triple tail does not seem to prevent this type of instability, however much it does to compensate for HTL.

        A fellow named Jerry (can't recall his last name; I think he was a doctor) used to fly one up from VA to our regional U.L. flyin in western NY State. He had a 532. He flew with a group of FW ultralights, but he was so much faster that he had to fly circles and S-turns to avoid pulling ahead of them.

        His machine had a somewhat longer takeoff roll and shallower climb angle than an open gyro. I used to show off at the flyin by doing vertical pirouettes in my little 447 Air Command. Not to be outdone by some cheapo flying lawn chair, he did them, too, in the Windryder.
        Jerry Eastman was the fellow. ROTORCRAFT magazine did a feature about him flying his Windryder all over the eastern seaboard, including into Canada.

        His gyro was owned by a local gyro guy (David Hill, who also was one of the many SnoBird gyro business owners for a short while), but he then sold it to someone in Texas for about 10K.

        I had looked it up on the FAA site last year or so, and it used to be found there (that's how I know it was last known to be in Texas), even after the registration had expired, but now I can't recall the N number.

        It can be found it by the name/model # (Eastman/Windryder).

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        • #19
          Found it!

          N# is: 81754

          751 COCKRELL HILL RD RED OAK, TX 75154-1451

          Dallas suburb.

          Rust & Allen, LLC. Some sort of financial services company that holds other aircraft, too.

          Anyone know the owner? No name given, only sale reported.
          Last edited by Kevin_Richey; 05-22-2014, 11:40 AM.

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          • #20
            I was just wondering, is the windryder a dated design, Sure it is not as sexy as the Arrow Copter, but But I don't think it would be at that price point, or is it what the US needs to compete with the Euro gyros? And at today prices what would a kit sell for?
            The only US enclosed gyro is the sport copterII and it is a premium product well out of the price range of the average hobbyist.
            The government cannot give anything to anybody that the Government does not first take from somebody else.

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            • #21
              I flew both the one that Harry died in and also Jerry's. The Windryder is a fine stable design. Just like any cabin gyro, you should fly them in coordinated flight, in trim. Most "cabin" gyros are not happy with a lot of slip. I personally like the aircraft. I even experienced an engine failure in one and it was a piece of cake. Even the 18A has slip limitations.
              Chris Burgess GYRO-CFI
              PRA #1680
              Frederick Maryland
              SnoBird Adventurer
              gyrocfi.burgess@gmail.com

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              • #22
                Jerry had the need for speed and moved on to a Pulsar f/w at 160mph+. Here are a couple old photos to ponder. One taken near Kill Devil hills NC (1989) before that one was sold to Harry and one taken at Frederick MD (1990) the day Jerry left everyone in the dust with his while he landed somewhere else and then caught back up to us still "chugging" away to the first destination. Map in hand looking for another place to go. Yeah, that's me (1989) when I was 40. A CFI still wet behind the ears with hair and dressed weird.!!!
                Attached Files
                Chris Burgess GYRO-CFI
                PRA #1680
                Frederick Maryland
                SnoBird Adventurer
                gyrocfi.burgess@gmail.com

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                • #23
                  It is not the enclosure that makes enclosed gyros lethal; it is the low center of drag.

                  Enclosed gyros with lateral drag center on the CG can be flown sideways as well as open frame gyros.

                  Euro-Bensen designers may very well know that but in order to have a marketable product, a gyro must be low slung and look like a Lamborghini.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by C. Beaty View Post
                    It is not the enclosure that makes enclosed gyros lethal; it is the low center of drag.

                    Enclosed gyros with lateral drag center on the CG can be flown sideways as well as open frame gyros.

                    Euro-Bensen designers may very well know that but in order to have a marketable product, a gyro must be low slung and look like a Lamborghini.
                    Chuck, which models are you speaking about ? Could you do a photoshop picture of what it would look like if it was properly designed ?

                    Thanks
                    Happy Flying, Chris S.

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                    • #25
                      When the center of drag and CG coincide, there is no rotational moment about the CG, permitting sideways flight without slip-roll coupling.

                      Drag center can be approximated by balancing a cardboard cutout of a profile on a pencil point; -the centroid of area.
                      Attached Files

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                      • #26
                        Hank Hinchman’s H1 Racer most likely had lateral center of drag above the CG, creating a moment about the CG that tended to roll the machine out of a slip.

                        http://www.rotaryforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=11457

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                        • #27
                          Yup, Jerry Eastman was the Windryder pilot I remember.

                          The principal design problem with "high riders" (no comment on the need for a Lamborghini look) is the vulnerable and/or very heavy and draggy nose gear leg. It's not too much of a problem on pavement, but it badly wants to bend back when flown off imperfect grass runways.

                          The nose leg design on Vance Breese's machine appears to employ a triagulated fixed strut with the wheel swivel on the bottom instead of the top. That's better than the usual setup, I think.

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                          • #28
                            Low thrustline machines often have fragile nosewheel struts.

                            But CLT machines generally have manageable nosewheel struts; -the Aviomania series of gyros is an example.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Chris Burgess View Post
                              Jerry had the need for speed and moved on to a Pulsar f/w at 160mph+. Here are a couple old photos to ponder. One taken near Kill Devil hills NC (1989) before that one was sold to Harry and one taken at Frederick MD (1990) the day Jerry left everyone in the dust with his while he landed somewhere else and then caught back up to us still "chugging" away to the first destination. Map in hand looking for another place to go. Yeah, that's me (1989) when I was 40. A CFI still wet behind the ears with hair and dressed weird.!!!
                              Chris,
                              LOVE the green shorts man !
                              Randy :D

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by CLS447 View Post
                                Why did Jim quit us, why ? Where is that guy who supposedly makes Skywheels ?

                                How long will my Skywheels last ?
                                Are Skywheels available again ?
                                Happy Flying, Chris S.

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