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Sun N Fun AR-1 showcase 2017 Video

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  • Sun N Fun AR-1 showcase 2017 Video

    Enjoy.
    https://youtu.be/iMb5BOm_GYg

    Thanks to Gerald

  • #2
    Greg Spiccola really is one with his machine! I don't recall seeing anyone doing such an elegant landing in strong wind conditions.

    Landing on one wheel also while turning, and, waving to spectators, all at the same time!

    On his descent to that landing, I observed him turning slightly left & right. Most likely to more accurately gauge the wind's strength to setup for that landing, or, to eat up a bit of altitude in order to land exactly where he wanted to plant it, or both.

    I'm awestruck!



    ​​​
    Last edited by Kevin_Richey; 06-18-2017, 06:52 AM.

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    • #3
      Very nice demonstration.

      The one wheel landing was very cool and not something I would try.

      The American Ranger has wonderful rudder authority and Greg knows how to exploit it well.
      Regards, Vance Breese Gyroplane CFI http://www.breeseaircraft.com/

      Comment


      • #4
        Yaw Mon!!! Being one with a machine or horse it feels like and become an extension of your body, he has wings in this case and; he is the bird.
        Thank you so much for sharing Gerald. You take the best videos!!
        Last edited by All_In; 06-18-2017, 07:25 AM.
        Resistance is futile…… You will be compiled!
        Cheers,
        John Rountree

        PRA- Director
        PRA- Volunteer Coordinator

        PRA31 - Vice President of S.D. Rotorcraft Club
        http://www.Pra31.org

        U.S. Agent for Aviomania Aircraft... the most stable gyroplane on the market today.
        See: Aviomania USA http://www.AviomaniaUSA.com

        OEM Dealer for MGL Avionics - glass cockpit EFIS for Experimental aircraft Ask about DISCOUNTS for PRA MEMBERS

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Vance View Post
          Very nice demonstration.

          The one wheel landing was very cool and not something I would try.

          The American Ranger has wonderful rudder authority and Greg knows how to exploit it well.
          Hi Buddy
          When I see Greg able to control one wheel in the air where he wants it, like we can in FW aircraft, it makes me wonder about the students rolling over Cavolon's.

          Are the student getting mixed up and reversing the control input flying it into the runway? Maybe it is like when you teach your children to tie their shoes and then they forget how in a couple of days.

          If gyros have that much control at low landing speeds I do not understand why they did not just put the wheel back down and land normally, like you do in a fix wing.

          Could you come up with a training exercise landing in crosswinds designed to land or raise a wheel and put it back down until it automatic?
          I haven't been trained in putting the wheel back down but I'd like to find an instructor who will train me to put the wheel back down now that I know gyros have that much control.
          Last edited by All_In; 06-18-2017, 07:41 AM.
          Resistance is futile…… You will be compiled!
          Cheers,
          John Rountree

          PRA- Director
          PRA- Volunteer Coordinator

          PRA31 - Vice President of S.D. Rotorcraft Club
          http://www.Pra31.org

          U.S. Agent for Aviomania Aircraft... the most stable gyroplane on the market today.
          See: Aviomania USA http://www.AviomaniaUSA.com

          OEM Dealer for MGL Avionics - glass cockpit EFIS for Experimental aircraft Ask about DISCOUNTS for PRA MEMBERS

          Comment


          • #6
            Putting a main wheel back down is simple in a gyro. Just rapidly move the stick over to that raised wheel. I'm guessing it's the same in an airplane.

            One time while I was practicing downwind landings in my gyro @ engine idle (makes for rapid ground speed!).

            I had leveled the rotor disk before turning around to immediately take off again, but that isn't enough in a stiff wind. I should have banked into the breeze since the rotors were still spinning nearly flight capable.

            As I turned into the crosswind position, the wind reminded me who is more powerful. My left main popped up a foot or more. Without thinking, I immediately put hard stick to port, plopping the main back onto the pavement.

            All the while, my mind was playing the scenario of what a rotorstrike and then tipping over was going to feel like.

            A chill coursed down my spine as I also instantly thought of all the expense it would have cost me to replace the rotorblades, twisted or bent rotorhead, mast and other tubing, tail feathers, etc, etc. Also, the idea of lost skin and broken bones was present.

            ​​​​That was enough to think about for the day, so I headed back to the hangar.

            Comment


            • #7

              I have been up on one wheel and it is not something I do intentionally.

              Several gyroplane pilots have described tipping over their gyroplanes to me and they all say it is like slow motion.

              I have not personally tipped over a gyroplane so I donít know what it is like.

              It is not a place I want to go.

              I feel it is a mistake to imagine a ground tip over it is a simple challenge and easily handled.

              If the rotor is near flight rpm it is my observation that it is still making lift and will still respond to cyclic inputs.

              I feel it is not a simple problem in part because as the disk slows it becomes a gyroscope and may not respond to control inputs the way I expect.

              I use the cyclic to control my position over the runway while descending to land and the rudder to align the aircraft with the direction of travel over the ground before touch down.

              I like to land with near zero roll.

              I tilt the rotor into the wind after touch down while it is slowing down and then level the rotor when it is nearly stopped.
              Regards, Vance Breese Gyroplane CFI http://www.breeseaircraft.com/

              Comment


              • #8
                Hi Guys:
                The video is for your enjoyment and showcases AR-1 authority of rudder and rotor inertia and maneuvering. The point was not really to push the one wheel landing. The wind was mainly crosswind with slight quartering headwind factor. About 15 knots gusting to 20 knots, about 5 knots headwind factor in my estimation. Even this crosswind helps takeoff distance tremendously as you can see. I would however never call a takeoff like this as takeoff roll distance spec even in marketing material. That should be in no wind at gross weight only. Being able to keep the pre-rotator engaged for short field takeoff while tilting the disc back also makes a difference as rotors don't slow down much but it does tax your pre-rotator system and requires more maintenance. Its a short field procedure only when needed.

                Greg basically came and landing into the wind but then turned to where he had to go while touching down. He could have just landed completely with no roll and then turned. We don't want people doing this landing. That wasn't the point. Energy and rotor management on each machine has to be practiced and obviously Greg has that down in AR-1. It does not mean anyone else needs to do this. Always fly safely and conservatively and maintain your machine with common sense.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I should add that putting a main wheel that has come up on a gyro pilot isn't as simple as just inputting hard stick to the side of that wheel to get it back on the ground.

                  If engine power is not at idle already, then disaster will rear it's ugly head w/in split seconds. I believe engine power in landing scenarios (instead of engine idle) is one of the root causes of landing accidents.

                  My thoughts are assuming we're talking about new-to-relatively-new gyroplane pilots...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Kevin_Richey View Post
                    I should add that putting a main wheel that has come up on a gyro pilot isn't as simple as just inputting hard stick to the side of that wheel to get it back on the ground.

                    If engine power is not at idle already, then disaster will rear it's ugly head w/in split seconds. I believe engine power in landing scenarios (instead of engine idle) is one of the root causes of landing accidents.

                    My thoughts are assuming we're talking about new-to-relatively-new gyroplane pilots...
                    Why is that Kevin?

                    Most instructors I know teach power on landings before power off landings because it reduces the rate of descent and slows the process down making a high flair easier to fix.

                    Even doing engine at idle landings if things are not going well part of the fix I use is adding power.
                    Regards, Vance Breese Gyroplane CFI http://www.breeseaircraft.com/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Vance: I agree with you regarding landings during training, except I feel a student should be proficient in engine-idle landings before soloing.

                      Landing with power on while not straight in the direction of travel is the problem for many beginners.

                      Machines have been wrecked as they bounce around under power. Sometimes the beginner forgets to remove power after touching down.

                      Someday in the future, some of the gyroplane pilots who have only been taught landing under power (airline style), will experience an engine power failure under 150' AGL, as they are set up for a landing, and have no altitude nor engine to avoid having the ground rise up and smash them & their aircraft.

                      I personally have experienced two gyroplane CFIs who teach right from the start the engine-idle landing: Ron Menzie & Jim Vanek.

                      It does make for a fast descent from the usual gyroplane pattern altitude of 500', if the student isn't ready for it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thank you for posting your experience. I've learned from all of you!
                        Resistance is futile…… You will be compiled!
                        Cheers,
                        John Rountree

                        PRA- Director
                        PRA- Volunteer Coordinator

                        PRA31 - Vice President of S.D. Rotorcraft Club
                        http://www.Pra31.org

                        U.S. Agent for Aviomania Aircraft... the most stable gyroplane on the market today.
                        See: Aviomania USA http://www.AviomaniaUSA.com

                        OEM Dealer for MGL Avionics - glass cockpit EFIS for Experimental aircraft Ask about DISCOUNTS for PRA MEMBERS

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Kevin_Richey View Post
                          Vance: I agree with you regarding landings during training, except I feel a student should be proficient in engine-idle landings before soloing.

                          Landing with power on while not straight in the direction of travel is the problem for many beginners.

                          Machines have been wrecked as they bounce around under power. Sometimes the beginner forgets to remove power after touching down.

                          Someday in the future, some of the gyroplane pilots who have only been taught landing under power (airline style), will experience an engine power failure under 150' AGL, as they are set up for a landing, and have no altitude nor engine to avoid having the ground rise up and smash them & their aircraft.

                          I personally have experienced two gyroplane CFIs who teach right from the start the engine-idle landing: Ron Menzie & Jim Vanek.

                          It does make for a fast descent from the usual gyroplane pattern altitude of 500', if the student isn't ready for it.

                          I donít know any CFI who omits engine at idle landings from their gyroplane training syllabus.

                          In my experience an actual engine out landing has a better glide slope and is more like a landing with a little power on. In The Predator about 1,100 engine rpm is similar to a stopped propeller. Her engine idles at 800 rpm.

                          All of the gyroplanes I have flown have better rudder authority on descent to land with a little power in.

                          I have saved some inelegant landings by adding power; both misaligned and too high a flair.

                          Some of my clients confuse what they see on YouTube with what is taught.

                          I donít know any CFIs who teach a power on fast touch down in a gyroplane with a linked nose gear.

                          The practical test standards for sport pilot, gyroplane discourage high speed landings and require a minimum of 15 hours of dual instruction and five hours of solo for a pilot with no certificate.

                          B. TASK: NORMAL AND CROSSWIND APPROACH AND LANDING
                          REFERENCES: FAA-H-8083-21; Gyroplane Flight Manual. NOTE: If a calm wind weather condition exists, the applicantís knowledge of the crosswind elements shall be evaluated through oral testing; otherwise, a crosswind approach and landing shall be demonstrated.
                          Objective. To determine that the applicant:
                          1. Exhibits knowledge of the elements related to normal and crosswind approach and landing.
                          2. Considers the wind conditions, landing surface, and obstacles.
                          3. Selects a suitable touchdown point.
                          4. Establishes and maintains a stabilized approach at the recommended airspeed with gust correction factor applied, Ī5 knots.
                          5. Establishes and maintains proper ground track with crosswind correction, as necessary.
                          6. Remains aware of the possibility of wind shear and/or wake turbulence.
                          7. Makes smooth, timely, and correct control application during the flare and touchdown.
                          8. Touches down smoothly, at a reduced forward airspeed beyond and within 200 feet of a specified point with no appreciable drift, and with the longitudinal axis aligned with the intended landing path.
                          9. Maintains crosswind correction and directional control throughout the approach and landing sequence.
                          Regards, Vance Breese Gyroplane CFI http://www.breeseaircraft.com/

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by fara View Post
                            Hi Guys:
                            Being able to keep the pre-rotator engaged for short field takeoff while tilting the disc back also makes a difference as rotors don't slow down much but it does tax your pre-rotator system and requires more maintenance. Its a short field procedure only when needed.
                            This is news to me because that is the technique Greg taught me for every single take-off. Pre-rotate with stick forward and engine at idle, then taxi onto the runway while slowly increasing RPM and moving the stick back until you're lined up on the runway with the stick all the way back and then you can begin your take-off roll and release the prerotator.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by EdResnick View Post
                              This is news to me because that is the technique Greg taught me for every single take-off. Pre-rotate with stick forward and engine at idle, then taxi onto the runway while slowly increasing RPM and moving the stick back until you're lined up on the runway with the stick all the way back and then you can begin your take-off roll and release the prerotator.
                              You will have to simply lubricate the U joints especially at the top more often and check them more often. They perform the easiest when straight when you have them at an angle, their lifespan is more limited. They are cheap but you have to check them and lubricate them and change it out.

                              Greg is teaching you to feel loading the rotors as you build speed. He believes that shot gun method of takeoff is not desirable and does not impart proper rotor management on to the student and is responsible for some retreating blade stall flip overs when slight mistakes are made in execution. From the flip over accidents in the US and UK and their frequency (remember some of the flip overs are not even reported and swept under the rug but they eventually get out through the grapevine), he may be right.

                              The other flip over (on landing) accident is due to excessive rake and no trail and pivot of the machine on the ground. The main axles are the pivot for the gyroplane on the ground. If front forks have no trail and linked nosewheel, a touchdown at slow speed 5 to 10 mph on the front fork with cross control or nose wheel sideways will dart the machine in that direction accelerating it and it will flip over more than likely. With trail like in AR-1, the wheel will try and straighten out.
                              Last edited by fara; 06-20-2017, 08:22 PM.

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