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New gyro planned with jump takeoff?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Vance View Post
    A jump takeoff gyroplane seen at the 2017 PRA convention.
    Are you sure thatís a gyro?

    Helicopters with main rotor torque compensation via a couple rather than by a single tail rotor pushing everything sideways are easier to fly.

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    • #17
      There's an NTSB report on N122DG, appears it crashed in 2011. The report shows it to be a jump gyro.

      https://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.a...11LA481&akey=1

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      • #18
        Thank you Vance !!! Could you give us a rundown on Dick's latest creation ?
        Happy Flying, Chris S.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by CLS447 View Post
          Thank you Vance !!! Could you give us a rundown on Dick's latest creation ?
          It will have to wait till next week. Today I am judging and giving a talk and then I will be rushing home in my rental Prius because I have a new client to teach and I have some work to do on The Predator.

          Hopefully someone will fill in in the meantime.
          Regards, Vance Breese Gyroplane CFI http://www.breeseaircraft.com/

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          • #20
            Originally posted by C. Beaty View Post

            Are you sure thatís a gyro?

            Helicopters with main rotor torque compensation via a couple rather than by a single tail rotor pushing everything sideways are easier to fly.
            Good morning Chuck,

            She has a partially powered rotor and flies in auto rotation.

            I feel comfortable referring to her as a gyroplane.

            I donít care to enter a semantics debate.

            The most amazing thing is how quiet she is.
            Regards, Vance Breese Gyroplane CFI http://www.breeseaircraft.com/

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            • #21
              It reminds me of this British helicopter of the 40s...

              ​​​​​​https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fairey_FB-1_Gyrodyne

              The tilting-head system, unusual in a helicopter, and its even more unusual, 'automatic' collective control, that seems related to Cierva's 'autodynamic rotor', are described here: https://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarch...0-%200669.html
              Last edited by XXavier; 08-04-2017, 09:01 AM.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by XXavier View Post
                It reminds me of this British helicopter of the 40s...
                The Fairey Gyrodyne illustrates the complications encountered in trying to avoid swashplate cyclic control.

                The tilt head cyclic control required servos (power steering) to tilt the head in order to avoid feedback of rotor drive torque into the cyclic control system. Human muscle power would have been insufficient.

                Unlike Dick DeGraws new machine with a prop on each side producing a balanced antitorque couple, the Gyrodyne used a single forward thrusting prop for rotor torque compensation which caused an extreme noseup hovering attitude.

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                • #23
                  And Dick DeGraw has been building jump start Gyros for almost 15 years now. Two Gyros - Jump Takeoff

                  • 7 years ago
                  • 67,284 views

                  A lot of people have seen the Gyrhino do it's awesome jump takeoff. But not all that many have ever seen two of them.

                  And there's gyros that have been built and used in the U.S. for a whole lot longer. I'm still searching, and I'll find a video of it again, 1920's vintage.

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                  • #24
                    Here's one video I remember: HD Historic Archival Stock Footage Autogyro Lands at White House 1931

                    • 3 years ago
                    • 3,374 views

                    Pitcairn test pilots demonstrate an autogyro that hops off the ground before star...HD Stock Footage

                    • 3 years ago
                    • 313 views

                    and here was one a little later.

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                    • #25
                      Here's a spin-up and take-off in an Air & Space 18A a few years ago (I'm the pilot). The action happens at about 1:49. It is almost a jump; I let it roll just a few feet before punching the button (no wind to speak of that day) These are flyable by anybody with a Private or higher rotorcraft-gyroplane rating, but not by one with only Sport Pilot privileges (too heavy and too complex).
                       

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                      • #26
                        if I recall the CarterCopter concept exhibited a most impressive jump capability combined with Larry Neal's equally impressive landing gear design. While the single seat open design certainly wasn't heavy the tip weights incorporated were massive and I think were an impediment to anything resembling a turn. I also think for a concept they proved what they wanted and were not targeting a blade to sell into the experimental market
                        Steve Greenwell

                        Experience keeps a dear school, yet fools will learn in no other.-- B Franklin

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