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First gyro? Air Command 503

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  • First gyro? Air Command 503

    I would like to buy my first gyro and have the chance to buy this early Air Command 503.
    Would this be suitable for a new pilot?
    Do they need any modifications to make it safer like the more recent gyros with CLT?
    I notice the later Air Command gyros were designed taller...
    Any advice much appreciated
    Damo


  • #2
    An astute observation Damian!



    Some feel that having the center of thrust pass nearer the center of gravity makes for a safer gyroplane.



    Others love their low rider Air Commands and swear by them.



    You will need training and having a trainer that flies like your aircraft makes transition to yours and solo easier.



    I have not flown an Air Command low rider so I donít know what gyroplane that would be.



    Most of the European gyroplanes have a high thrust line and have a much larger horizontal stabilizer that may make a big difference in how they fly.



    Good luck on your gyroplane adventure.
    Regards, Vance Breese Gyroplane CFI http://www.breeseaircraft.com/

    Comment


    • #3
      Vance covered the non-CLT issues and small HS.

      The other questions is how often she will fly your weight with a 503 at your current altitude and temperature = density altitude .increases with temperature. You may only be able to fly in the morning and cool of the evening or not at all depending on how much you weigh and the density altitude = elevation of the field and temperature.

      The other question that determines how often you will be able to fly is what density altitude will you be flying at?

      Gyro's are very draggy only have a 4 to 1 glide ratio compared to FW's 10 to 1. We need more horsepower than FW'er.
      Last edited by All_In; 05-02-2017, 09:13 PM.
      Resistance is futile…… You will be compiled!
      Cheers,
      John Rountree

      PRA- Director
      PRA- Volunteer Coordinator

      PRA31 - Vice President of S.D. Rotorcraft Club
      http://www.Pra31.org

      U.S. Agent for Aviomania Aircraft... the most stable gyroplane on the market today.
      See: Aviomania USA http://www.AviomaniaUSA.com

      OEM Dealer for MGL Avionics - glass cockpit EFIS for Experimental aircraft Ask about DISCOUNTS for PRA MEMBERS

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by All_In View Post
        Vance covered the non-CLT issues and small HS.

        The other questions is how often she will fly your weight with a 503 at your current altitude and temperature = density altitude .increases with temperature. You may only be able to fly in the morning and cool of the evening or not at all depending on how much you weigh and the density altitude = elevation of the field and temperature.

        The other question that determines how often you will be able to fly is what density altitude will you be flying at?

        Gyro's are very draggy only have a 4 to 1 glide ratio compared to FW's 10 to 1. We need more horsepower than FW'er.
        I weigh around 210 lbs (95 kg) with helmet, suit etc and will be flying from an airstrip around 50ft ASL.
        Would that work?

        Comment


        • #5
          If the engine is in good shape that should work fine Damian.

          Please don't fly it without training.
          Regards, Vance Breese Gyroplane CFI http://www.breeseaircraft.com/

          Comment


          • #6
            210 lbs would be towards to upper limit of that machine with a 502. It will probably fly fair, but not great. Of course, if the price is right, you could buy it, put on a 582 and enjoy it.
            Bobby Munroe
            Private Pilot (SEL)
            PRA Chapter 62 #42748
            EAA #1160523

            Comment


            • #7
              I agree with Bobby, 50th is good but you will be flying at the upper limit, on some very not days pilots of your weight have reported that performance is marginal.
              At higher fields the 503 will limit you to only flying in the cool of the morning and late afternoon. Think Fly-in's like Rotor over the Rockies etc.

              Here is a presentation that will tech you what you need to know to select the correct gyroplane for how and where you fly. http://mentoneairport.com/How2SelectGyro.aspx
              It took me four years of asking questions to learn gyroplane aerodynamics with this you can learn it all in 1 hours.



              Resistance is futile…… You will be compiled!
              Cheers,
              John Rountree

              PRA- Director
              PRA- Volunteer Coordinator

              PRA31 - Vice President of S.D. Rotorcraft Club
              http://www.Pra31.org

              U.S. Agent for Aviomania Aircraft... the most stable gyroplane on the market today.
              See: Aviomania USA http://www.AviomaniaUSA.com

              OEM Dealer for MGL Avionics - glass cockpit EFIS for Experimental aircraft Ask about DISCOUNTS for PRA MEMBERS

              Comment


              • #8
                Damo65.... I have flown my Gyrobee with a 447 at my home airport in New Mexico for 50 or 60 hours now. Altitude is 3200 ft. and DA will go to 6000 ft. I have 24' Dragon Wing blades. I weigh about the same as you and my gyro weighs in at 310 lbs. After training and starting to transition to your own gyro, you will learn rotor management very well if you take your time and learn your machine.
                I am not able to fly when it gets over 75*F.Tthe 447 is just not enough. That being said, I have flown a lot below that temperature. Climb rate is only 25 0r 30 feet a minute on some days. I just take it easy and stay in the airport area until I get several hundred feet of altitude and off to explore the countryside.
                I had some members say that I could not fly with a 447 at my altitude. I was just going to kill myself.I had several members encouraging me saying I could fly just fine with practice. I spent many hours flying the runways and over the airport learning my machine.
                By the way, my machine was built by a gentleman living at sea level. He was about 250 lbs. and the gyro weighed just over 300 lbs. and said the gyro flew very good at sea level. Several videos of him flying. I bought the machine from another man who was about 175 lbs. and flew at elevation of 600 ft. and the gyro flew fine. Not a hot rod, but was a joy to fly.
                I found that with training and time spent being cautious and learning my gyro, I could enjoy flying. Many people on here said I could not fly with my conditions and setup. I am glad I did not listen to only them and that I talked to people that had flying experience with a 447. The people on here can be of great help!
                I now live where the elevation is 800 ft and the gyro does very well. Such fun to fly! I hope you get the training and then take the time to learn your machine and have a blast flying it!

                Comment


                • #9
                  I weigh 220 I have a lowrider just like that one. When I bought it it had a 447 which I flew for 3 years but at 50AGL in the summer it could not keep me up. I put a 503 on it and at this altitude and my weight it has more than enough power.
                  Paul Brady

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