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Mohawk Arrow - a new USA-Built Enclosed/Convertible Gyroplane

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  • #31
    Originally posted by eutrophicated1 View Post
    It that an unreasonable expectation? Do you expect your car maker to meet that?
    I think it's perfectly reasonable to expect these things of any manufacturer of durable goods. And in experimental aircraft, that manufacturer is you. If we lack the commitment to support the machines that bear our own names on the data plates, perhaps we should buy something certified instead.

    If you buy a Cessna, the manufacturer meets all your qualifications. You could also build four or five RV10s for the same money and have a more advanced, better-performing plane. The world's full of choices!

    Paul W. Plack
    Private ASEL, SP Gyroplane
    Secretary, URA & PRA2
    Editor, Western Rotorcraft

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    • #32
      I suspect amateurism when I see a pointy nose on an aircraft intended for sub-100 mph flight. This shape is reasonable for bullets and hypersonic aircraft; sub-optimal for low-speed craft.

      The best airfoil shapes for our speeds have a rounded leading edge, with a radius of around 2% of chord. The designers of blimps and streamlined struts pay close attention to this rule.

      Is it a big deal in terms of performance? No. Does it suggest ignorance of aerodynamics? Totally.

      When you are trying to assess the competence of the designer of your craft, little "tells" like this can be interesting. The guy trying to sell you an aircraft that he designed owes you honest answers about his training and engineering knowledge. No seller should be offended if a buyer asks for his resume. We are talking life and death here.

      For comparison, Igor Bensen had at least a degree in engineering from Stevens Institute of Technology, IIR. It shows in little design details of the B8M gyro (which is not as "eyeball engineered" as it looks).

      As always, watch your back and do your homework in the homebuilt-aircraft jungle.


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      • #33



        A Gyro has to look good Doug,thats because when on a flyby you are in view probably

        for at least 3 times, maybe 4 times longer than anything else.
        Best Regards,
        Eddie Sigman,Polvadera,nm
        (575) 835-4921

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        • #34
          I have to disagree, Doug; the shape of retail hardware doesn’t always say much about the engineering expertise of the designer. Take automobile tail fins for example; I think they first appeared on Cadillacs in the late 1950s and within a short time, all automobiles had to have tail fins. Didn’t have a thing to do with engineering.

          Or better still, the fancy oxcarts of Costa Rica: I expect those like the one pictured are solely intended to entertain tourists. Hauling sugarcane in such a contraption would cause the solid wooden wheels to disintegrate after a mile or two on a paved road. If Costa Ricans really need an oxcart for hauling sugarcane, they go to the nearest automobile junkyard, pick up an axle and wheels with rubber tires and build a working oxcart.

          Covering a gyrocopter’s bare bones with Flash Gordonesque style fiberglass panels makes it a marketable product. As with most consumer products, perception is everything.

          Of course, we both know that gyro designers are mostly by guess and by gosh designers.
          Click image for larger version

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          • #35
            Actually Chuck because of Engineers like you all of that work has been done and is readily available and just about anyone could

            probably design a good flying Gyro using that information.

            I personally have benefited from your expertise,because of that I believe gyro flying has became a lot safer,Thank You.
            Best Regards,
            Eddie Sigman,Polvadera,nm
            (575) 835-4921

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            • #36
              Thanks Eddie, I appreciate that. My personal hero is Jean Claude DEBREYER, perhaps the smartest engineer I'’ve ever known.

              Actually, most of the engineering was done by Igor Bensen. His rotor system, combining Arthur Young’s teetering, underslung rotor with Cierva’s tilt head cyclic system is the universal system in use today. Because it was used by Bensen, the NACA 8H12 rotor airfoil is the universal airfoil in use today; not because it was the best but amateurs evidently think it was a special gyro airfoil.

              Bensen didn’t disclose much technical detail, that had to be extracted.
              Last edited by C. Beaty; 09-17-2018, 05:00 PM.

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              • #37
                Your welcome Chuck,its apparent that you have done a great job extracting the info and making it understandable for the average person.
                Last edited by eddie; 09-18-2018, 03:18 PM.
                Best Regards,
                Eddie Sigman,Polvadera,nm
                (575) 835-4921

                Comment


                • #38
                  Wahoo, That's a very great compliment and I appreciate it even more, coming from a genius builder like you, Chuck.

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                  • #39
                    You deserve the compliment, JC. You’re the only person I know who has memorized all 4 of Maxwell’s partial differential equations postulating electromagnetic radiation. (just being silly)

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by C. Beaty View Post
                      You deserve the compliment, JC. You’re the only person I know who has memorized all 4 of Maxwell’s partial differential equations postulating electromagnetic radiation. (just being silly)
                      I thought that was Britney Spears
                      http://britneyspears.ac/lasers.htm

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                      • #41
                        Sorry Brian that was Cher.
                        Best Regards,
                        Eddie Sigman,Polvadera,nm
                        (575) 835-4921

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