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Tires: What types you use and why

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  • #16
    Thank you Jake. Amazing the interesting things that can be learned from the most benign questions.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Brian Jackson View Post
      Thank you Jake. Amazing the interesting things that can be learned from the most benign questions.
      No problem.
      Since I am 1/1024th Scientist I know benign things !!!
      Life,The leading cause of Death

      Live and Learn--OR--Die and be an example

      321.252.7705

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      • #18
        Originally posted by gyrojake View Post

        No problem.
        Since I am 1/1024th Scientist I know benign things !!!
        ...and binary :-)

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        • #19
          I donít entirely buy into this nitrogen thing. I know that the molecules are larger. Our atmosphere is 80% nitrogen. Why donít the smaller oxygen (and other gases) molecules leak out first, leaving you with a higher concentration of nitrogen that increases every time you add air to the point where you have close to 100% nitrogen after a few air charges. I use nitrogen in air shocks because there is no moisture content in the nitrogen. But, is the moisture an issue inside a tire tube?

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          • #20
            Originally posted by cesphil View Post
            I donít entirely buy into this nitrogen thing. I know that the molecules are larger. Our atmosphere is 80% nitrogen. Why donít the smaller oxygen (and other gases) molecules leak out first, leaving you with a higher concentration of nitrogen that increases every time you add air to the point where you have close to 100% nitrogen after a few air charges. I use nitrogen in air shocks because there is no moisture content in the nitrogen. But, is the moisture an issue inside a tire tube?
            I've read some articles about the subject and all them agree that filling your tires with nitrogen is no more than pumping extra cash out of untutored customer. Yes, nitrogen molecule has larger diameter than oxygen molecule. They are whole 6% larger =) Thus this gives no profit. Moisture and dust in vulgar air also don't play much for tubes and tires but if one is worry then it's easy to use compressed air after filtering it.

            Alex Lameko
            Russian gyroforum
            Visit my collection of gyro videos

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            • #21
              I cant say much about arguments for or against Nitrogen usage but.....explain to me why the airlines has used Nitrogen in their tires exclusively from the time jet aircraft have been flying.
              The oxygen expands at 'altitude' and the use of Nitrogen prevents a tire explosion in flight. (their explanation, not mine) but it certainly makes sense....and I know someone here is going to
              say 'we don't fly that high so what does it matter'....again, personal choice. But I will add that flying 'at altitude' at our airport for many years, I do not see any appreciable loss in tire pressure
              throughout the changing seasons. Also, I used to use it in the air shocks of my old Dominator and they would always leak down air....not so with the Nitrogen...go figure?!!
              Mark
              __________________

              Risk lurks in the edges of marginality.. ..There are penalties to be paid for pushing the envelope..
              The speed in which a woman says "nothing" when asked "What's wrong?" is inversely proportional to the severity of the storm that's coming.
              No tyrant, foreign or domestic, should be permitted to die a natural death.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by cesphil View Post
                I donít entirely buy into this nitrogen thing. I know that the molecules are larger. Our atmosphere is 80% nitrogen. Why donít the smaller oxygen (and other gases) molecules leak out first, leaving you with a higher concentration of nitrogen that increases every time you add air to the point where you have close to 100% nitrogen after a few air charges. I use nitrogen in air shocks because there is no moisture content in the nitrogen. But, is the moisture an issue inside a tire tube?
                Our atmosphere is a COLLOID of gasses, just like salt is an emulsion of sodium and chloride. They just don't separate under normal conditions. To separate the gasses in our atmosphere, electrolysis, heat or extreme compression must be used.
                I don't use the stuff myself in my gyro, but my car does, and I notice the pressure does not change as much from hot to cold weather.
                Man. y"all need to smoke better weed!!! It get's you in tune with the ................................................. What were we talkin about ?
                Life,The leading cause of Death

                Live and Learn--OR--Die and be an example

                321.252.7705

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Brian Jackson View Post

                  ...and binary :-)
                  Binary my ass, and the thirteen other asses in my head !! :)
                  I wish i only had two personalities, it would make decisions so much easier :)
                  Life,The leading cause of Death

                  Live and Learn--OR--Die and be an example

                  321.252.7705

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                  • #24
                    The aviation industry has been using nitrogen forever in all things requiring air pressure tires,landing gear struts,etc.

                    I have heard that it also prevents rust on the inside of struts.
                    Best Regards,
                    Eddie Sigman,Polvadera,nm
                    (575) 835-4921

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                    • #25
                      The scientist in me says...
                      Base 10 ... 1/102410 in Binary (Base 2) would be 1/100000000002

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                      • #26
                        14 CFR 25.733 (e) For an airplane with a maximum certificated takeoff weight of more than 75,000 pounds, tires mounted on braked wheels must be inflated with dry nitrogen or other gases shown to be inert so that the gas mixture in the tire does not contain oxygen in excess of 5 percent by volume, unless it can be shown that the tire liner material will not produce a volatile gas when heated or that means are provided to prevent tire temperatures from reaching unsafe levels.

                        "This amendment to the Federal Aviation Regulations (FAR) requires that an inert gas, such as nitrogen, be used in lieu of air, for inflation of tires on certain transport category airplanes. This action is prompted by at least three cases in which the oxygen in air-filled tires combined with volatile gases given off by a severely overheated tire and exploded upon reaching auto-ignition temperature. The use of an inert gas for tire inflation will eliminate the possibility of a tire explosion." ĖFederal Register: February 26, 1993 (Volume 58, Number 37)], Page 11778

                        This rule was adopted in the 1990s (not "since the time of jet aircraft") to prevent large tires from literally exploding, from combustion of volatile gases, should they become severely overheated on landing.
                        Last edited by Tyger; 10-21-2018, 07:05 PM.

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                        • #27
                          Tyger,
                          Poor choice of words on my part...sorry. My inference was for common carrier passenger aircraft. Thought folks would understand that.
                          It's (nitrogen) usage was in place long before the FAA made it a rule. Airline pilots union were the ones who pushed for and got the rule
                          in place. The military has been using it for decades. A reactive rather than proactive decision as usual for the FAA.
                          Last edited by mark treidel; 10-22-2018, 06:01 AM.
                          Mark
                          __________________

                          Risk lurks in the edges of marginality.. ..There are penalties to be paid for pushing the envelope..
                          The speed in which a woman says "nothing" when asked "What's wrong?" is inversely proportional to the severity of the storm that's coming.
                          No tyrant, foreign or domestic, should be permitted to die a natural death.

                          Comment

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