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  #46  
Old 01-05-2017, 11:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fara View Post
A bunch of drones are going to replace helicopters and its commercial pilot for all monitoring observation missions and so on.
There will never be a replacement for me and you wanting to fly because we love to fly but all that work stuff can be outsourced cheaply to something that isn't quite there yet.
I was having a conversation a couple years ago with someone in the airport management field, and tried to make this same point to him. My specific prediction was that many Class-D airports with waiting lists for GA hangar space, including his, are vulnerable financially due to their reliance on a business model based on certified piston twins and sales of leaded avgas. If they count on a helicopter school tenant for revenue, worse still.

I honestly believe that in my lifetime, GA will all but disappear, with the most robust remaining sector being recreational flight. GA already doesn't pencil out for many owner-piloted business trips that made sense just a few years ago.

Our local gyro CFI, Mike Burton, has moved to a new airport and, with his partner Marc Campbell, has set up an FBO which will specialize in hangars for LSA, Rotax A&P and mogas sales. As the only publicly-owned airport in the metro area with that specialty, I think it will find a profitable niche.
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  #47  
Old 02-02-2017, 01:59 AM
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What are the pros & cons of owning a certified gyro ?
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  #48  
Old 02-02-2017, 06:55 AM
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Originally Posted by CLS447 View Post
What are the pros & cons of owning a certified gyro ?
For mine, pros include:
no LODA to instruct
I can use it commercially
I can charge for rides
no fly-off time or operating restrictions, with access to all airspace and airports
It makes it easier to insure and finance
it was designed, engineered, tested, and built by professionals who knew what they were doing
it is as reliable as a Cessna

For cons:
It needs an IA for annuals (and that's o.k. by me)
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  #49  
Old 02-02-2017, 09:37 AM
EdResnick EdResnick is offline
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Suitable experimentals have access to all airspace and airports as well, even Class A.
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  #50  
Old 02-02-2017, 10:47 AM
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My comment above was addressed to this:

91.319(c) Unless otherwise authorized by the Administrator in special operating limitations, no person may operate an aircraft that has an experimental certificate over a densely populated area or in a congested airway. The Administrator may issue special operating limitations for particular aircraft to permit takeoffs and landings to be conducted over a densely populated area or in a congested airway, in accordance with terms and conditions specified in the authorization in the interest of safety in air commerce.

From Day 1, Hour 1 a certificated aircraft is always exempt from this.
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  #51  
Old 02-02-2017, 10:50 AM
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P.S., pros:

There is a robust AD, Service Bulletin, and NTSB reporting process for certified aircraft that enhances fleet safety.
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  #52  
Old 02-02-2017, 10:59 AM
chrisk chrisk is offline
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I'd prefer a certificated aircraft, but I also recognize there is a down side besides requiring an IA for inspection. All the replacement parts need to comply with the type certificate. What happens when the manufacturer goes out of business? What happens when the manufacturer is the sole source for a part and they want a small fortune for the part?
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  #53  
Old 02-02-2017, 04:30 PM
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For moribund companies, one is permitted to manufacture (or have someone manufacture) replacement parts so long as you do it consistent with the original specs. PMA is also possible for competitors.

Most of the bits on my gyro (especially those that get consumed) are industry standard stuff (Lycoming engine, Hartzel prop, Cleveland wheels/brakes, Gates belts, Goodyear tires, etc.) so there are far fewer unique bits than one might otherwise guess.
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  #54  
Old 02-02-2017, 11:23 PM
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Default Commercial Operations?

Quote:
Originally Posted by WaspAir View Post
For mine, pros include:
I can use it commercially
What kind of commercial operations are you talking about and are you referring to your 18a?
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  #55  
Old 02-03-2017, 02:38 AM
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Default The most important principle.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WaspAir View Post
For mine, pros include:
no LODA to instruct
I can use it commercially
I can charge for rides
no fly-off time or operating restrictions, with access to all airspace and airports
It makes it easier to insure and finance
it was designed, engineered, tested, and built by professionals who knew what they were doing
it is as reliable as a Cessna

For cons:
It needs an IA for annuals (and that's o.k. by me)
I LOVE the 18A
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  #56  
Old 02-03-2017, 03:06 AM
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For the annual condition inspection (and most work) on a Primary TC Calidus an A&P is required. This is different from standard aircraft. In this respect, primary and LSA are similar. However there is no 16 hour course or limited repairman certificate available. There is a provision for the manufacturer to have an FAA accepted training course for owners to do some task. That is not available as of yet from AutoGyro USA.
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  #57  
Old 02-03-2017, 06:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gyrodeputy View Post
What kind of commercial operations are you talking about and are you referring to your 18a?
Yes, both the 18A and my old J-2 can be used for tasks including aerial photography. I'm not interested in pipeline patrol or other occupations, but it is legal for use for that.
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  #58  
Old 02-03-2017, 06:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bryancobb View Post
I LOVE the 18A
I had thought about highlighting that same phrase about professionals -- thanks!
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  #59  
Old 02-03-2017, 01:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WaspAir View Post
My comment above was addressed to this:

91.319(c) Unless otherwise authorized by the Administrator in special operating limitations, no person may operate an aircraft that has an experimental certificate over a densely populated area or in a congested airway. The Administrator may issue special operating limitations for particular aircraft to permit takeoffs and landings to be conducted over a densely populated area or in a congested airway, in accordance with terms and conditions specified in the authorization in the interest of safety in air commerce.

From Day 1, Hour 1 a certificated aircraft is always exempt from this.
You can watch that one get broken all day everyday here in southeast Florida. Pretty close to impossible to leave any of our coastal airports without first flying over some very densely populated areas.
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  #60  
Old 02-03-2017, 05:11 PM
Uncle Willie Uncle Willie is offline
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Originally Posted by Fly Army View Post
You can watch that one get broken all day everyday here in southeast Florida. Pretty close to impossible to leave any of our coastal airports without first flying over some very densely populated areas.
This is another of those After The Fact Rules.
The problem is that there is no definition of "Densely Populated."

If you fly pylon turns around the buildings in downtown Chicago and maintain proper separation from the buildings and don't loose an engine and don't collide with the buildings, It is not a violation.
If you do lose an engine and set it down safely on the freeway going through downtown. No Violation.

If you lose an engine and hit the only farm-house with 3 miles.
That is primary evidense that the area was too densely populated "to effect a safe emergency landing in the event of a power unit failure, without hazard to persons or property on the surface". Violation!

There is a rumored case where someone made an approach to a remote airport, to show off his new aircraft.
He passed over a few farm houses on the approach and made a low pass down the runway with his friends standing safely 300 feet off the side.
He reportedly received a violation because the low pass was done with the Gear UP.
This supposedly indicated that he had no intentions or capability to land and therefore did not meet the, "Except for takeoffs and landings, this aircraft may not be operated over densely populated areas"
or "Within 500 ft of person or property of value" rules.

The determination of Densely Populated will be made After the Accident.
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