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LAWOLF
03-29-2005, 04:18 PM
The FAA called and said I would have to obtain a license to fly a gyrocopter. Can anyone tell me the rules for the license and the class and what I have to do to get certified. Also any instructors to qualify me in the close area of Post Falls, Idaho and or Washington or Montana etc. I need the closes one to me. Maybe TODP you can let me know and does everyone have a license to fly Gyrocopters?? I have a 3 class medical and a pilots license for single engine as well as a license to fly a CAP aircraft.

Ron Marlett
03-29-2005, 07:35 PM
You may be able to obtain training in Auburn WA.(about 10 hours round trip drive from Post Falls) from Randy Coplen, the AAI dealer in Seattle. I believe he currently has one Sparrowhawk gyro to train in and last time I checked he had at least 1 instructor available.

Here is his contact information:

R Coplen 206-947-4900
AAI Dealer (SparrowHawk) in Seattle
r.coplen@comcast.net
Flight School and Build Center

pwendell
03-29-2005, 08:25 PM
The FAA called and said I would have to obtain a license to fly a gyrocopter. Can anyone tell me the rules for the license and the class and what I have to do to get certified. Also any instructors to qualify me in the close area of Post Falls, Idaho and or Washington or Montana etc. I need the closes one to me. Maybe TODP you can let me know and does everyone have a license to fly Gyrocopters?? I have a 3 class medical and a pilots license for single engine as well as a license to fly a CAP aircraft.

Actually you do not require any additional ratings to fly by yourself in an experimental gyroplane. A private, or recreational, certificate with any category/class rating in sufficient to be legal. BUT, in my opinion, it is absolutely crucial to get some dual instruction from an experienced gyro CFI before attempting to fly your gyro. Gyros are NOT airplanes. They require different reflexes and have very different takeoff and landing profiles. A good CFI will also be able to work with you to transition you to your single seat gyro and help come up with a solid test flight program.

I believe that Randy Coplen has two excellent CFIs that instruct in Sparrowhawks in Seattle. There is also a Sparrowhawk CFI in Salt Lake.

LAWOLF
03-30-2005, 04:39 AM
Thanks everyone I will visit the FAA today and see when they will actualy come and see the Gyro that I will fly once I get some instruction by your suggestions. I will keep you posted on the results up to when I takeoff up up and away.

barnstorm2
03-30-2005, 05:49 AM
You will need to have an Airworthyness Certificate and N-Number.

Harry_S.
03-30-2005, 06:23 AM
Hi Donald:

Good luck in trying to get the Fed's to inspect your machine?! I waited two months for them to make a date. They finally suggested I contact a DAR...I did and three days later, I had my C of A.

Again, Donald...find a Gyro instructor and receive dual instruction for as many hours as necessary for you to perform supervised solo. And I caution you again...do not try to fly your machine until the instructor endorses your book to do so.

I have lost two friends in the past...both of them thought they could solo their machine after only 6-8 hrs. of instruction. They both died on their first solo flight. It's a downright shame.

I know your tired of hearing this but...have someone knowledgeable/experienced in gyro construction, look your machine over and make suggestions where needed to bring your project to the flight test stage. Good luck.


Cheers :)

barnstorm2
03-30-2005, 07:49 AM
Donald,

Harry is completely correct.

I would like to add a few comments.

Many people with thousands of hours of fixed wing time thought they could fly a gyro with no or little training and they are now DEAD.

Gyros require Gyroplane SPECIFIC training.

More then one gyroplane CFI has told me that fixed wing pilots are HARDER TO TRAIN IN GYROS because they have to UNLEARN some of the instinctual reactions they have from flying fixed wings.

Students that have never flown anything are actually in general easyer students to teach gyro flying to.

Jerry Carter
03-30-2005, 05:57 PM
Donald,



More then one gyroplane CFI has told me that fixed wing pilots are HARDER TO TRAIN IN GYROS because they have to UNLEARN some of the instinctual reactions they have from flying fixed wings.

Students that have never flown anything are actually in general easyer students to teach gyro flying to.

For example, it took me a little while to get comfortable with the go-around and recovery from ballooned landing procedures in the gyro. In an airplane, I instinctively nudge the stick forward as I apply power to regain flying speed and attitude. In my RAF, I had to learn to PULL BACK on the stick while applying power, otherwise the nosegear could slam down on the runway with disasterous results. Those of you that don't fly fixed-wing aircraft may be puzzled at why this was hard for me. It just illustrates how different these aircraft are to fly.